Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPontius Pilate
IN THE NEWS

Pontius Pilate

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 12, 2001
An Annapolis Chorale performance of Johann Sebastian Bach's "St. Matthew Passion" showcased historic St. Anne's Episcopal Church's restored look Saturday. In this beautifully refurbished setting that cost more than $1 million, the beginning of Holy Week was celebrated with Bach's majestic oratorio, sung to words of the Gospel describing Christ's betrayal, arrest, trial, crucifixion and entombment. St. Anne's dates to Bach's era - the original church was built on the site in 1692, seven years after the composer's birth.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 7, 2006
A nearly sold-out opening night and strong advance sales convinced the Annapolis Summer Garden folks that local audiences will welcome what is new, regardless of the weird title. In fact Urinetown, The Musical has found a snug environment here at Annapolis Summer Garden's intimate casual outdoor City Dock setting. It offers the cacophony of boat horns, revving motorcycle engines and occasional sirens as a distinctive counterpoint to the intriguing score of this 1999 fringe hit that debuted on Broadway in 2001.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | April 10, 2003
Three decades after Jesus Christ Superstar first became a hit, it's striking how shrewd and savvy the Tim Rice/Andrew Lloyd Webber interpretation of the New Testament remains. Despite some unavoidably dated dialogue, the 1971 version of the betrayal and execution of the man thought by Christians to be the son of God is alternately cheeky and affecting. The show wrestles with such issues as mob psychology, the seductive hazards of celebrity and free will. Rice, who wrote the lyrics, imbued the figures cast by history as the villains of this story - Judas and Pontius Pilate - with a complex humanity.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 25, 2004
Underneath its pretentious trappings, including Latin and Aramaic dialogue (with English subtitles), Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ is just a religious exploitation movie - in the same genre, if not the same league, as The Exorcist. Gibson's marketing has targeted fundamentalist Christians who go to family films or to none at all. If they haven't been to movies regularly in the decades since slasher films revolutionized gory makeup, they won't know what hits them. Understandably, they may confuse the crude power of seeing a blameless prophet pummeled, flayed, punctured, gouged, torn, nailed and speared with something spiritually potent and divine.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 12, 2001
An Annapolis Chorale performance of Johann Sebastian Bach's "St. Matthew Passion" showcased historic St. Anne's Episcopal Church's restored look Saturday. In this beautifully refurbished setting that cost more than $1 million, the beginning of Holy Week was celebrated with Bach's majestic oratorio, sung to words of the Gospel describing Christ's betrayal, arrest, trial, crucifixion and entombment. St. Anne's dates to Bach's era - the original church was built on the site in 1692, seven years after the composer's birth.
NEWS
By Neil Baldwin and Neil Baldwin,special to the sun | May 11, 1997
"The Gospel According to the Son," by Norman Mailer. Random House. 208 pages. $21.Perhaps more than most literary encounters, it is essential to approach this novel with a cleared mind. Purge all expected thoughts such as how "pretentious" it is of Norman Mailer to presume to retell the story of Jesus as if he were "He." Do not go into the story thinking that "only someone with an immense ego like Mailer" would try to reformulate the Gospels in the first- person narrative of their central character.
SPORTS
By Michael Katz and Michael Katz,New York Daily News | April 15, 1991
ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- "A faithful witness, someone'll stick with you when you need them . . . There are always people sneaking up behind you, hugging your pocket."Thus saith the Rev. George Foreman yesterday, preaching at the Shiloh Baptist Church.It was a sermon by the mount who will challenge Evander Holyfield for the heavyweight championship Friday night in the other Atlantic City. Maybe it was a shill -- getting the 42-year-old minister to Shiloh, a two-story brick building with peeling paint on a block of desolation -- a chance to get a few live minutes of ESPN time and make a few pay-per-view sales.
NEWS
By MARY JOHNSON and MARY JOHNSON,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 7, 2006
A nearly sold-out opening night and strong advance sales convinced the Annapolis Summer Garden folks that local audiences will welcome what is new, regardless of the weird title. In fact Urinetown, The Musical has found a snug environment here at Annapolis Summer Garden's intimate casual outdoor City Dock setting. It offers the cacophony of boat horns, revving motorcycle engines and occasional sirens as a distinctive counterpoint to the intriguing score of this 1999 fringe hit that debuted on Broadway in 2001.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to the Sun | July 14, 1995
If the rock opera format of Andrew Lloyd Webber's "Jesus Christ Superstar" seemed a bit controversial back in 1971, watching the show now is more of a reassuring nostalgia trip.As the current revival at Towson State University makes clear, "Superstar" still rocks. And, for better or worse, it still has tunes you can't get out of your head.This production aims to put its own stamp on the material by making Judas (Shawn Doyle) a somewhat moodier and more introspective fellow than is usually the case in this oft-produced play.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | September 17, 1995
A University of Maryland historian and his team of archaeologists have uncovered the foundations of a grand pagan temple erected by Herod the Great, the wily and tyrannical ruler of Palestine in the first century B.C. and one of the master builders of the ancient world.After weeks of digging, excavators in July exposed some of the massive stones that once supported the gleaming, 2,000-year-old temple at Caesarea, Israel. They also recovered pieces of its columns and other sculpted stone.King Herod built the city and the temple about a decade before the birth of Christ.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | April 10, 2003
Three decades after Jesus Christ Superstar first became a hit, it's striking how shrewd and savvy the Tim Rice/Andrew Lloyd Webber interpretation of the New Testament remains. Despite some unavoidably dated dialogue, the 1971 version of the betrayal and execution of the man thought by Christians to be the son of God is alternately cheeky and affecting. The show wrestles with such issues as mob psychology, the seductive hazards of celebrity and free will. Rice, who wrote the lyrics, imbued the figures cast by history as the villains of this story - Judas and Pontius Pilate - with a complex humanity.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 12, 2001
An Annapolis Chorale performance of Johann Sebastian Bach's "St. Matthew Passion" showcased historic St. Anne's Episcopal Church's restored look Saturday. In this beautifully refurbished setting that cost more than $1 million, the beginning of Holy Week was celebrated with Bach's majestic oratorio, sung to words of the Gospel describing Christ's betrayal, arrest, trial, crucifixion and entombment. St. Anne's dates to Bach's era - the original church was built on the site in 1692, seven years after the composer's birth.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 12, 2001
An Annapolis Chorale performance of Johann Sebastian Bach's "St. Matthew Passion" showcased historic St. Anne's Episcopal Church's restored look Saturday. In this beautifully refurbished setting that cost more than $1 million, the beginning of Holy Week was celebrated with Bach's majestic oratorio, sung to words of the Gospel describing Christ's betrayal, arrest, trial, crucifixion and entombment. St. Anne's dates to Bach's era - the original church was built on the site in 1692, seven years after the composer's birth.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2000
There's nothing terribly wrong with "Jesus," save for the occasional silliness that comes from putting a new spin on oft-told stories. It's enjoyable enough and certainly not disrespectful. But there's nothing particularly right about "Jesus" either. The two-part miniseries, which debuts tomorrow night on CBS, tries very hard to create a Messiah that TV viewers can relate to. So we get Jesus joking with his friends, Jesus playing tag with his apostles -- the Messiah as a regular, unassuming guy with a winning smile who's pretty much resigned to his fate.
NEWS
By James F. La Croce | April 10, 1998
THE Vatican's recently released statement on the Holocaust, and the "spoiled seeds" of anti-Semitism could have no better venue than the Good Friday service. To be sure, its solemn retelling of the crucifixion is a moment of Christian hope, reminding us of the unbelievable depth of God's love. But it is also a moment of Christian shame, serving as a solemn occasion for indicting "the Jews" as killers of Christ and cursed by God.Ask who brought Jesus from the garden of olive trees to the terrible tree on Calvary, and the Good Friday story seems to accuse "the Jews."
NEWS
By Neil Baldwin and Neil Baldwin,special to the sun | May 11, 1997
"The Gospel According to the Son," by Norman Mailer. Random House. 208 pages. $21.Perhaps more than most literary encounters, it is essential to approach this novel with a cleared mind. Purge all expected thoughts such as how "pretentious" it is of Norman Mailer to presume to retell the story of Jesus as if he were "He." Do not go into the story thinking that "only someone with an immense ego like Mailer" would try to reformulate the Gospels in the first- person narrative of their central character.
NEWS
By James J. Kilpatrick | December 25, 1990
COMPARED TO the magnificent nativity scene in New York's Metropolitan Museum, the little creche around our Christmas tree is no great shakes. Yet I found myself the other evening gazing at the tiny figure of the babe in the manger with an overwhelming sense of curiosity and awe.Who was he? The question has haunted historians and theologians through all ages. Who was he? I ask the question not as a priest or minister might ask it. Matters of religious faith are off my beat. It is the who, what, where and when that absorb my reveries.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 25, 2004
Underneath its pretentious trappings, including Latin and Aramaic dialogue (with English subtitles), Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ is just a religious exploitation movie - in the same genre, if not the same league, as The Exorcist. Gibson's marketing has targeted fundamentalist Christians who go to family films or to none at all. If they haven't been to movies regularly in the decades since slasher films revolutionized gory makeup, they won't know what hits them. Understandably, they may confuse the crude power of seeing a blameless prophet pummeled, flayed, punctured, gouged, torn, nailed and speared with something spiritually potent and divine.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | September 17, 1995
A University of Maryland historian and his team of archaeologists have uncovered the foundations of a grand pagan temple erected by Herod the Great, the wily and tyrannical ruler of Palestine in the first century B.C. and one of the master builders of the ancient world.After weeks of digging, excavators in July exposed some of the massive stones that once supported the gleaming, 2,000-year-old temple at Caesarea, Israel. They also recovered pieces of its columns and other sculpted stone.King Herod built the city and the temple about a decade before the birth of Christ.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to the Sun | July 14, 1995
If the rock opera format of Andrew Lloyd Webber's "Jesus Christ Superstar" seemed a bit controversial back in 1971, watching the show now is more of a reassuring nostalgia trip.As the current revival at Towson State University makes clear, "Superstar" still rocks. And, for better or worse, it still has tunes you can't get out of your head.This production aims to put its own stamp on the material by making Judas (Shawn Doyle) a somewhat moodier and more introspective fellow than is usually the case in this oft-produced play.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.