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By JOHN RIVERA and JOHN RIVERA,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1995
Pope John Paul II, arriving at Camden Yards to celebrate Maryland's first papal Mass, was greeted by a congregation of 50,000 who cheered and made the sign of the cross as the pontiff entered the stadium-turned-cathedral.Shepherd I, carrying the pontiff, touched down at Baltimore-Washington International Airport at 10:13 a.m. for the 10-hour pastoral visit. The plane taxied to a cargo area, where the pope emerged shortly before 10:30. He took a step down the staircase and as the wind whipped his white cassock, he removed his skullcap and waved it to the crowd of about 100 dignitaries and their families.
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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
Ever since she met Pope John Paul II when she was a schoolgirl in 1995, Melissa Brent has frequently replayed the brief encounter in her mind. But when she learned that John Paul would be canonized as a saint this weekend, she burst into tears. "Everything was just real, all of those emotions just hit me at once. … All these years and it's like, 'Wow, I met a saint and I can feel it,' " said Brent, a 26-year-old nurse now living in Virginia Beach. In 1995, Brent was living in Columbia with her family and attending third grade at St. William of York School in Baltimore.
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NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1995
In the last major remarks of his day in Baltimore, Pope John Paul II urged a group of religious leaders assembled in the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen to bridge their differences.Before an audience that included dozens of elected officials, business leaders and college presidents, the pope applauded America's tradition of religious tolerance and repeated his familiar calls for increased social involvement and an end to abortion."I encourage everyone to strengthen and extend the ecumenical dialogue that has been for so long a hallmark of this community," the pope told the invitation-only assembly of some 1,300.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr and By Leonard Pitts Jr | December 5, 2013
I like capitalism. Specifically, I like the idea that if I write a better book, have a better idea, build a better mousetrap, I will be rewarded accordingly. A system where everyone gets the same reward regardless of quality or quantity of work is inconsistent with excellence and innovation, as the mediocrity and inefficiency that beset the Soviet Union readily proves. The woman who is successful under capitalism gets to eat steak and lobster whenever she wants. That's never bothered me. What does bother me is the notion that the unsuccessful man who lacks that woman's talent, resources, opportunities or luck should not get to eat at all. There is something obscene in the notion that a person can work full time for a multinational corporation and earn not enough to keep a roof over his head or food on his table.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,Los Angeles Times | April 20, 2008
NEW YORK -- Admirers saw an unusually personal side of Pope Benedict XVI yesterday when he ad-libbed a reference to his faults and sins and later spoke of the "sinister" Nazi regime that was the backdrop of his youth. Both passages uttered by the pope were remarkable in their frankness and came as the German-born theologian observed the third anniversary of his election as pontiff. On the penultimate day of his six-day pilgrimage to the United States, Pope Benedict presided over Mass at St. Patrick's Cathedral in Manhattan and exhorted members of a depleted priesthood to overcome hurtful divisions and act "as beacons of light" in the service of the church.
NEWS
By CARL M. CANNON and CARL M. CANNON,SUN NATIONAL STAFF Sun staff writer Sandy Banisky contributed to this article | October 5, 1995
NEWARK, N.J. -- Pope John Paul II arrived in the United States yesterday on a pilgrimage of peace to a nation he described as the model for democracy everywhere in the world."
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 26, 1998
HAVANA -- Pope John Paul II's historic visit to this last bastion of communism in the Western Hemisphere culminated yesterday with an outdoor Mass where a jubilant crowd of more than 200,000 heard him press again for greater freedom under the socialist regime and denounce the excesses of capitalism.Cubans chanted and cheered the pope on his fifth day here at the Mass held in Havana's Plaza of the Revolution, the traditional gathering place for Cuba's Communist Party.In a homily interrupted by applause more than 20 times, John Paul told Cuban Catholics their church is "not alone or isolated."
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 11, 2005
VATICAN CITY - Nine days after critical breathing trouble landed him in the hospital, Pope John Paul II emerged from the medical complex yesterday, boarded his glass-encased "popemobile" and rode through the streets of Rome to his home in the Vatican. From his vehicle, Pope John Paul waved haltingly at crowds outside the hospital, including patients in their pajamas, and at those awaiting him in St. Peter's Square. The surprise decision to use the specially fitted car for the three-mile journey, instead of the ambulance that rushed him to the hospital late Feb. 1, was seen as an effort to reassure an anxious public after the 84-year-old pontiff's latest health scare.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2002
TORONTO - Roman Catholic youths from around the world gave Pope John Paul II a rowdy welcome worthy of a rock star yesterday as the pontiff called on them to reject the hatred of violence and terror and to resist the materialism of Western culture. A cheering crowd of about 400,000 youths from 170 nations gathered at a public park on the shores of Lake Ontario to greet Pope John Paul, who made his first appearance at the weeklong 17th World Youth Day celebration. The crowd included more than 50,000 from the United States.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACh and CHRIS KALTENBACh,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1995
Sure, Boyz II men were the headliners at last night's papal concert. And yeah, the screaming didn't let up for even one second of the 20-minute set.But the loudest cheer of the evening was reserved for a 75-year-old from Rome who wasn't even there, a transplanted Pole who closed the concert not with a song, but simply by telling the crowd by satellite that he was looking forward to his visit to Baltimore.So who was more popular at Pier Six last night, the pop singers or the pontiff?For the 4,500 screaming fans who were lucky enough to land the free tickets distributed to parishes and youth groups by the Archdiocese of Baltimore, it was probably a draw.
NEWS
By William E. Lori | September 29, 2013
There's no doubt about it, Pope Francis has captured the attention of the Catholic Church and the world. And he is doing this not only by a simplicity and humility that has earned him the nickname, "the world's parish priest" but also by taking the church back to the basics. Through his humble actions and kind words, the pope is reminding all Catholics - including us bishops - that our first priority is and must always be to know and love God the Father who has revealed his love through his Son Jesus Christ, a love that is communicated to us through the Holy Spirit.
NEWS
March 14, 2013
Newly elected Pope Francis represents change in many respects. He is the first pope from the New World (and the first from outside of Europe in 1,200 years), the first Jesuit and the first Francis. But for American Catholics, who in poll after poll in recent weeks have expressed disagreement with the church's stances on the ordination of women or the requirement of celibacy for priests, he may seem like more of the same. Pope Francis, the former Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio of Buenos Aires, is a doctrinaire conservative in those matters, as were Pope Benedict XVI and Pope John Paul II before him. Given the views of the College of Cardinals - all of whom were appointed by John Paul or Benedict - it could hardly have been otherwise.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 27, 2013
Pope Benedict XVI retires Thursday, and he leaves the workplace the way many of us would like to - on his own terms. He wasn't laid off at 50 with few transferable skills, required to retrain or reinvent himself and then compete for work with people half his age. His job wasn't outsourced (although the conclave set to choose his successor may elect someone from another country to do his job). He is 85, but he didn't have to keep working because the recession wiped out his meager 401(k)
NEWS
By William E. Lori | February 17, 2013
Years ago, I accompanied James Cardinal Hickey, then the archbishop of Washington, to St. Charles Borromeo Seminary in Philadelphia, where then-Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger was to give a lecture. After his lecture and after fielding questions from his audience, Cardinal Ratzinger boarded a small plane that would take him and five other passengers to Washington, where he would attend a dinner and then give another lecture. Even though he was suffering from a bad cold and the flight was quite turbulent, Cardinal Ratzinger remained calm and serene.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,SUN REPORTER | April 21, 2008
This was supposed to be an introduction. On his first papal visit to the United States, Pope Benedict XVI would celebrate a few Masses, give a speech at the United Nations, and let a nation that knew him by his reputation as the church's doctrinal enforcer experience his softer, warmer, more welcoming side. Somewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, plans changed. Shepherd One hadn't yet touched down at Andrews Air Force Base when Pope Benedict made his first comments on the sex abuse crisis that has shaken the Roman Catholic Church in America.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tracy Wilkinson,Los Angeles Times | April 20, 2008
NEW YORK -- Admirers saw an unusually personal side of Pope Benedict XVI yesterday when he ad-libbed a reference to his faults and sins and later spoke of the "sinister" Nazi regime that was the backdrop of his youth. Both passages uttered by the pope were remarkable in their frankness and came as the German-born theologian observed the third anniversary of his election as pontiff. On the penultimate day of his six-day pilgrimage to the United States, Pope Benedict presided over Mass at St. Patrick's Cathedral in Manhattan and exhorted members of a depleted priesthood to overcome hurtful divisions and act "as beacons of light" in the service of the church.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | April 20, 2005
It was 1914, and the world was at war, the last time a pope took the name Benedict. Pope Benedict XV, a mild-mannered diplomat who was elected as German troops invaded Russia, Belgium and France, tried to be a peacemaker with the world powers - and within a church that was roiled by dissent between traditionalists and liberals pushing for reforms. Though he failed to broker an end to what he called "the suicide of Europe," Pope Benedict is widely credited with working toward international reconciliation after World War I. He also succeeded in smoothing over church divisions in the wake of his conservative predecessor, Pope Pius X, and became one of the first popes to promote a more ecumenical outlook and to reach out to Eastern Orthodox churches.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2014
Ever since she met Pope John Paul II when she was a schoolgirl in 1995, Melissa Brent has frequently replayed the brief encounter in her mind. But when she learned that John Paul would be canonized as a saint this weekend, she burst into tears. "Everything was just real, all of those emotions just hit me at once. … All these years and it's like, 'Wow, I met a saint and I can feel it,' " said Brent, a 26-year-old nurse now living in Virginia Beach. In 1995, Brent was living in Columbia with her family and attending third grade at St. William of York School in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Michael Amon and Michael Amon,NEWSDAY | April 17, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Pope Benedict XVI began the first full day of his U.S. visit being serenaded by thousands of spectators at the White House and ended it with a sweeping speech to the nation's bishops in which he admitted that the sex abuse scandal was "very badly handled." President Bush invited the pope for an elaborate ceremony on the South Lawn, and then the two leaders privately discussed issues such as immigration and the Middle East. Thousands filled the streets of downtown Washington as Pope Benedict shuttled between events in the popemobile.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | April 17, 2008
WASHINGTON -- With his visits to a synagogue and a mosque, his acknowledgment of the sins of Christians against Muslims and Jews, and his decision to establish diplomatic relations with Israel, Pope John Paul II won the appreciation and trust of believers of other faiths the world over. His successor, meeting today with leaders of other faiths during his first American visit, is developing a very different kind of reputation. In his three years as spiritual leader of the world's 1.1 billion Roman Catholics, Pope Benedict XVI has alienated other Christians with his repeated assertion that his is the one true church.
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