Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPomp
IN THE NEWS

Pomp

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ken Fuson and Ken Fuson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 16, 2003
By Sorrow's River, by Larry McMurtry. Simon & Schuster. 368 pages. $26. Through the first two novels in a planned four-book set, members of the Lord Berrybender family have survived - some of them, anyway - random Indian attacks, brutal blizzards and a rampaging buffalo stampede. What other perils await these wacky European aristocrats and their servants, whose oafish patriarch decided for some strange reason to embark on a hunting trip throughout the untamed American West in the 1800s?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 8, 2013
Dear Maryland taxpayer, My eldest child graduated from her public high school recently, and there was much celebration and excitement. When the 425 proud students of the Class of 2013 marched into the new Tiger Arena at Towson University in their caps and gowns, there was hardly a dry eye in the house. The customary "Pomp and Circumstance" echoed across the gym. Speeches were made. Award-winners were recognized. Diplomas were awarded and hands were shaken. And from the school principal to the valedictorians, there were heartfelt thanks given - to classmates, to teachers, to school administrators and yes, even to parents.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 8, 2013
Dear Maryland taxpayer, My eldest child graduated from her public high school recently, and there was much celebration and excitement. When the 425 proud students of the Class of 2013 marched into the new Tiger Arena at Towson University in their caps and gowns, there was hardly a dry eye in the house. The customary "Pomp and Circumstance" echoed across the gym. Speeches were made. Award-winners were recognized. Diplomas were awarded and hands were shaken. And from the school principal to the valedictorians, there were heartfelt thanks given - to classmates, to teachers, to school administrators and yes, even to parents.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2011
Within a sea of blue firefighters' uniforms, some people could not contain their sorrow, and others didn't even try. The flag-draped casket bearing the body of Mark G. Falkenhan, the veteran Baltimore County firefighter who died in a blaze last week, was carried Monday from the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, led by a lone bagpiper. Hundreds of white-gloved hands snapped a simultaneous salute. The grief-stricken widow, Gladys Falkenhan — who lost her father, another firefighter, only last month — held a scarf to her face as she gripped her eldest son's hand.
FEATURES
By FRED RASMUSSEN | June 12, 1994
Please send old photos of people mowing lawns, within the next week, to Way Back When, Sun Magazine, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 21278. You must include caption information and your daytime phone number. Also, enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope if you'd like your photo returned. If your photo is your only copy, please send a good-quality duplicate, not the original. No faxes or newspaper clippings, please.
NEWS
By CARL T. ROWAN | June 7, 1991
In Newton County, Georgia, 35 miles southeast of Atlanta, we have a classic, pathetic example of what happens when the president of the United States goes about railing against ''quotas,'' ''unfair preferences'' and ''reverse discrimination.''The result is that no minority person can earn anything without some white person saying that, under his rules, it belongs to him.It means that once-peaceful communities become poisoned by paranoid notions that the empowered majority is being rooked by those who in truth have little power.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | May 18, 2008
Signaled by excessive sniffling, watery eyes and intermittent nose-blowing, the Maryland season we all know so well has arrived. It's graduation time. Some of us thought the weeks of celebratory send-offs would be less emotional with our second or third child. But we were wrong. No matter what, it is always easier to be the one moving on instead of the one remaining behind. After all, the one leaving is infused with an adventurer's energy; he or she can't help but be enthusiastic about the opportunity to live and work in a new environment.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | March 23, 1995
BOSTON -- For once, they pulled together.Reggie Lewis' mother, Inez "Peggy" Ritch, took the rope in one hand, holding her 1-year-old granddaughter, Reggieana, with the other.Lewis' widow, Donna Harris-Lewis, also grabbed hold of the rope, clutching her other child, 2-year-old Reggie Jr.They pulled together, these women who barely speak to each other, raising Lewis' No. 35 to the rafters of ancient BostonGarden.And like so much else on this night, it didn't quite seem real."Oh man, it was like your heart just shattered," Ritch said afterward as she stood crying in a hallway outside the Celtics' locker room.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing writer | March 5, 1991
I often think of the places I'd like to have in music history.Imagine attending services at St. Thomas of Leipzig, with the great Bach himself pounding out on of his own fugues on the chapel organ.Or to have been in the audience as Felix Mendelssohn resurrected Bach's "St. Matthew Passion" at its first Leipzig performance since the composer's death some 80 years earlier.The-premier of Beethoven's Ninth Symphony must have been an unbelievably emotional affair as well. But one musical site I keep returning to over and over in my mind is St. Mark's Cathedral in Venice right around 1600.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | December 12, 1991
Military bands are designed to provide pomp and circumstance for most any occasion. But few bands anywhere are capable of creating the sense of ceremony that Her Majesty's Coldstream Guards and the Queen's Own Highlanders do."American audiences are fascinated by the tradition and pageantry that we portray," said Sgt. Gale Lawson, a 25-year veteran of the Guards, who will appear here tomorrow night with the Highlanders at the Baltimore Arena.Little wonder. The history of the two regimental British units, who are winding up a 71-city tour of the United States, can be traced back more than 200 years; some of the songs in their repertoire go back that far as well.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | July 4, 2010
As this is Fourth of July weekend and we're all filled with the usual patriotic fervor, it's time to again address my pet peeve: singers at the ballpark who turn the national anthem into a nightclub act. It was in this town, after all, that Francis Scott Key penned "The Star-Spangled Banner" during the Battle of Fort McHenry in the War of 1812. But ol' Francis Scott, he'd roll over in his grave if he saw what some performers do to his beloved song in their pre-game renditions.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | January 3, 2009
LANHAM - At a production studio in suburban Maryland, a worker is applying glitter to a replica of the Liberty Bell - part of the Pennsylvania float in this month's inaugural parade - when Earl Hargrove strolls in. He's carrying a toy bugle in one hand and wearing a huge grin on his face. More than most people, Hargrove loves a parade. Barack Obama has promised to bring change to Washington, but when the inaugural committee hired Hargrove Inc. to orchestrate events around his swearing-in, it instead chose experience.
NEWS
By JANET GILBERT | May 18, 2008
Signaled by excessive sniffling, watery eyes and intermittent nose-blowing, the Maryland season we all know so well has arrived. It's graduation time. Some of us thought the weeks of celebratory send-offs would be less emotional with our second or third child. But we were wrong. No matter what, it is always easier to be the one moving on instead of the one remaining behind. After all, the one leaving is infused with an adventurer's energy; he or she can't help but be enthusiastic about the opportunity to live and work in a new environment.
NEWS
By Michael Amon and Michael Amon,NEWSDAY | April 17, 2008
WASHINGTON -- Pope Benedict XVI began the first full day of his U.S. visit being serenaded by thousands of spectators at the White House and ended it with a sweeping speech to the nation's bishops in which he admitted that the sex abuse scandal was "very badly handled." President Bush invited the pope for an elaborate ceremony on the South Lawn, and then the two leaders privately discussed issues such as immigration and the Middle East. Thousands filled the streets of downtown Washington as Pope Benedict shuttled between events in the popemobile.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,sun reporter | May 31, 2007
They are out in the world now -- although still under your roof, eating your food, using your washing machine, still not making their bed, still running up text message bills. Except for all that, your high school graduates are finally on their own. High schools across Maryland are holding commencements this season. Graduation time anywhere remains an enduring ritual, a formula of processionals, addresses, interludes, introductions, speeches, tassel turning and a whole lot of names read very carefully.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | May 18, 2007
Rehka Thomas graduates today, four years of pharmacy school behind her and a great party ahead of her, with a cake shaped like a mortar and pestle, and prescription bottle favors with instructions to take two of the candy pills inside to treat a sweet tooth. Like other graduates who scatter once they get their degrees, she, too, plans to leave Baltimore - but in her case, she's leaving with, and because of, an unwanted souvenir: a bullet, embedded in her upper chest where her clavicle and sternum meet.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 18, 2005
WASHINGTON - Robert Frost wrote poetry for John F. Kennedy's inauguration. Pity he never got to read it. Sunshine, reflecting off piles of fresh snow, blinded the famed poet. So he just recited an oldie he knew by heart. In 1861, Abraham Lincoln had to be smuggled through Baltimore under dark of night to make it safely to his swearing-in. He was trying to evade Confederate sympathizers who wanted to kill him. Lincoln lived to see a second inauguration, in 1865. He may have wished he hadn't; his vice president, Andrew Johnson, embarrassed him by giving a speech drunk.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | January 18, 2007
Motorists traveled at breakneck speed over the Mason-Dixon Line from Pennsylvania yesterday morning, zooming past the "Maryland Welcomes You" sign. Presumably, few on Interstate 83 South pondered that it would be the last day Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. would officially welcome them into the state as governor, his name attached to the bottom of the sign. At 9:50 a.m.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | June 2, 2006
Carlos Urtecho, 17, a senior at Mount Hebron High School, was thrilled to graduate this week, but the biggest highlight of his young academic career occurred last month during the annual Conexiones convocation ceremony at Howard High School. Urtecho, one of 56 Hispanic students honored at the event, received scholarship money, a certificate of achievement, and - most important - individual recognition for completing his high school career. "It's very good for Hispanic students to get representation in Howard County," he said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.