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Polygraph Tests

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By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
Polygraph tests for three top officials at the Baltimore City Detention Center began Sunday, in an effort to determine the extent of the corruption federal investigators allege plagued the jail. Rick Binetti, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, declined to comment Sunday on the outcome of the polygraph tests for interim jail administrator Ricky Foxwell and two deputy administrators. The corrections department's internal affairs unit and Maryland State Police investigators administered the polygraphs, and the information gleaned from them could factor into potential disciplinary actions or the decision to prosecute.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
Polygraph tests for three top officials at the Baltimore City Detention Center began Sunday, in an effort to determine the extent of the corruption federal investigators allege plagued the jail. Rick Binetti, a spokesman for the Maryland Department of Public Safety and Correctional Services, declined to comment Sunday on the outcome of the polygraph tests for interim jail administrator Ricky Foxwell and two deputy administrators. The corrections department's internal affairs unit and Maryland State Police investigators administered the polygraphs, and the information gleaned from them could factor into potential disciplinary actions or the decision to prosecute.
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NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Karen Hosler and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 24, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Aldrich Hazen Ames passed two polygraph tests in the nine years that he was allegedly being paid $1.5 million by the Soviets and Russians for his espionage services.This, and the CIA's failure to lock onto the millionaire's lifestyle reportedly financed by his spymasters, were the keys to his survival as an alleged traitor for so long.All CIA employees are given polygraph tests every five years, with questions keyed to establishing whether they are, in the terms of the spy trade, "clean."
NEWS
By David Zenlea and David Zenlea,Sun reporter | February 17, 2008
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold is seeking state aid to defray the cost of environmental and food testing as part of a modest legislative agenda he has laid out at the State House. Among the most noteworthy initiatives, Leopold is seeking a $100,000 reimbursement to cover the county's testing of at least 83 wells in West County in connection with fly-ash contamination of well water.
TOPIC
By Laird B. Anderson | August 1, 1999
SPARKED BY allegations that Chinese spies stole secrets from U.S. nuclear weapons laboratories, the Department of Energy plans to administer polygraph tests to an estimated 5,000 scientists and others who handle sensitive national security information.Energy Secretary Bill Richardson ordered the tests last fall despite protests from lower-ranking DOE officials. At the time, it was unclear that the so-called "lie detector" tests would be given on a broad scale instead of a case-by-case basis in instances in which espionage was suspected.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2001
A custody battle that was played out in a seven-day trial, generated 1,400 pages of testimony and cost the combatants hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees was "reluctantly" returned to the Anne Arundel Circuit Court yesterday on an appeal ruling. In an 11-page decision, the Maryland Court of Special Appeals said the Circuit Court's finding of abuse by the 39-year-old mother was flawed because of the use of testimony about the results of polygraph tests administered to the child's father by a psychiatrist who had counseled the couple.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2001
A custody battle that was played out in a seven-day trial, generated 1,400 pages of testimony and cost the combatants hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees was "reluctantly" returned to the Anne Arundel Circuit Court yesterday on an appeal ruling. In an 11-page decision, the Maryland Court of Special Appeals said the Circuit Court's finding of abuse by the 39-year-old mother was flawed because of the use of testimony about the results of lie-detector tests administered to the child's father by a psychiatrist who had counseled the couple.
NEWS
December 14, 1994
As Carroll County's newly elected state's attorney, Jerry F. Barnes has the opportunity to change a number of long-standing practices of the prosecutor's office. Beginning the selective use of polygraph tests on rape victims, however, should not be among those changes.Even if lie detector use would be a "one-in-a-thousand kind of thing," as Mr. Barnes said, testing rape victims demeans them and sends the wrong message to the community. We can't fathom the motives of Mr. Barnes, who this fall unseated the county's prosecutor of 20 years, Thomas E. Hickman.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | April 24, 1994
An Arbutus man who maintained his innocence since his arrest last June on charges arising from an armed robbery at an Elkridge liquor store has been found not guilty by a Howard Circuit Court jury.Dennis Edwin O'Donnell Jr., 34, was acquitted of armed robbery, robbery and a weapons violation by a jury of seven women and five men that deliberated about 2 1/2 hours Thursday.Mr. O'Donnell was accused of pulling a revolver on the owner of the Elkridge Liquors shop in the 5800 block of Washington Blvd.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 25, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The legislation tightening security checks that CIA Director R. James Woolsey endorsed yesterday would subject "top secret" federal officials to the sort of financial surveillance that could have uncovered the millionaire lifestyle of Aldrich Hazen Ames."
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | October 9, 2003
In an appeal for a new trial, lawyers for Ellicott City dance teacher Jose Anibal Macedo say they have polygraph test results that show "no deception" in his denial of allegations that he tried to rape a teen-age student. The test is part of a document filed in Howard Circuit Court by Macedo's new lawyers this week to supplement legal papers filed by the 42-year-old ballet instructor's original trial lawyers. Macedo was convicted of attempted rape, child abuse and related sexual offenses in July.
NEWS
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 4, 2002
WASHINGTON - FBI Director Robert S. Mueller III said yesterday that the bureau will give more agents polygraph tests, delve deeper into agents' financial records and tighten access to its computer systems in response to the devastating damage caused by Robert P. Hanssen, the FBI agent turned Russian spy. Mueller outlined the plans in advance of an independent report on the matter that could be released as soon as today. The report is expected to be highly critical, revealing serious security flaws throughout the agency.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2001
A custody battle that was played out in a seven-day trial, generated 1,400 pages of testimony and cost the combatants hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees was "reluctantly" returned to the Anne Arundel Circuit Court yesterday on an appeal ruling. In an 11-page decision, the Maryland Court of Special Appeals said the Circuit Court's finding of abuse by the 39-year-old mother was flawed because of the use of testimony about the results of polygraph tests administered to the child's father by a psychiatrist who had counseled the couple.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | January 23, 2001
A custody battle that was played out in a seven-day trial, generated 1,400 pages of testimony and cost the combatants hundreds of thousands of dollars in legal fees was "reluctantly" returned to the Anne Arundel Circuit Court yesterday on an appeal ruling. In an 11-page decision, the Maryland Court of Special Appeals said the Circuit Court's finding of abuse by the 39-year-old mother was flawed because of the use of testimony about the results of lie-detector tests administered to the child's father by a psychiatrist who had counseled the couple.
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2000
When physicist Wen Ho Lee first denied leaking U.S. nuclear secrets to the Chinese, authorities from the Department of Energy in 1998 wired him to a polygraph to see if he was lying. The Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist passed. But when a polygraph expert from the FBI looked at the same test results later, he concluded that Lee had not told the truth. How could the same lie detector test lead investigators to exactly opposite conclusions? The case of Lee, who eventually pleaded guilty to one felony count of mishandling classified information, has left law enforcement experts trying to answer the same fundamental questions that have existed since the invention of the lie detector 80 years ago: Does the polygraph actually work?
TOPIC
By Laird B. Anderson | August 1, 1999
SPARKED BY allegations that Chinese spies stole secrets from U.S. nuclear weapons laboratories, the Department of Energy plans to administer polygraph tests to an estimated 5,000 scientists and others who handle sensitive national security information.Energy Secretary Bill Richardson ordered the tests last fall despite protests from lower-ranking DOE officials. At the time, it was unclear that the so-called "lie detector" tests would be given on a broad scale instead of a case-by-case basis in instances in which espionage was suspected.
NEWS
By David Zenlea and David Zenlea,Sun reporter | February 17, 2008
Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold is seeking state aid to defray the cost of environmental and food testing as part of a modest legislative agenda he has laid out at the State House. Among the most noteworthy initiatives, Leopold is seeking a $100,000 reimbursement to cover the county's testing of at least 83 wells in West County in connection with fly-ash contamination of well water.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | November 1, 1996
Allegations that county police Lt. Thomas Suit ordered a subordinate to change the results of a polygraph test are "completely unfounded," Anne Arundel police said in a statement released yesterday.Police said an investigation by Sgt. Keith Williams of the intelligence section found no criminal misconduct on the part of the lieutenant. The statement said the Maryland attorney general's office conducted a separate investigation and affirmed that the "allegations of misconduct were unfounded."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | July 14, 1995
Call it high-tech truth serum -- a suitcase-sized metal box that its inventor says can tell fact from fiction by simply measuring stress in a person's voice.The Florida entrepreneur proclaims his device, which he touts as a replacement for the polygraph, is a "revolutionary breakthrough in truth verification" and tells police: "You can solve your crime rate in your office."The Baltimore Police Department just bought one for $7,700, and is spending $3,000 for a one-week course to train three detectives.
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