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By Elizabeth Joseph | May 28, 1991
I MARRIED a married man.In fact, he had six wives when I married him 17 years ago. Today, he has nine.In March, the Utah Supreme Court struck down a trial court's ruling that a polygamist couple could not adopt a child because of their marital style. Last month, the national board of the American Civil Liberties Union, in response to a request from its Utah chapter, adopted a new policy calling for the legalization of polygamy.Polygamy, or plural marriage, as practiced by my family is a paradox.
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EXPLORE
June 7, 2012
Julian Bauer's May 31 letter raises some important questions. He says marriage benefits society, and therefore not everyone should be allowed to marry. He says "homosexuality ... [has] an effect on society," but the only effect he names is a supposed decline in birth rates. He doesn't explain how banning same-sex marriage would increase birth rates. Bauer says the comparison to interracial marriage is a "straw man. " He should read the arguments in Loving v. Virginia about miscegenation and God's will.
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NEWS
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 2003
SALT LAKE CITY - The kidnapping of teen-ager Elizabeth Smart allegedly by a man who wanted her to be his "plural wife" has fueled concern in Utah over young girls' involvement in the deeply controversial practice of polygamy. Activists say that, although the circumstances of Smart's case are unique, sexual abuse of young girls and incest are common in many polygamist groups, and that enforcement of anti-polygamy laws is lax. The "tragic irony is that the horrible things that happened to her happen every day of the year to other young girls in these communities," said David Leavitt, a lawyer who prosecuted one of Utah's best-known polygamists in 2001.
NEWS
By Lori W. Hollander | August 25, 2011
A state delegate from Virginia recently wrote on this page that "Sexual orientation is not limited to same- or complementary-sex attractions but includes attractions to children, prostitutes, multiple wives (polygamy), dead persons (necrophilia), animals, inanimate objects and others that could not printed in the Baltimore Sun out of deference to readers. " Not only is this statement erroneous and misleading, it demonstrates a reckless disregard for the gay community. As licensed marriage and relationship therapists in practice with straight and gay couples for 23 years, my husband and I have seen firsthand the relationships of gay and lesbian couples.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 3, 2004
ELDORADO, Texas - The jokes have already started, in the cafes and on Main Street, but they draw more nervous laughter than actual merriment. Some men ask where they can apply to be a husband; others say, no thanks, one wife is trouble enough. Polygamy is funnier from afar and less so with proximity. This west-central Texas town is about to become home to about 200 members of a renegade Mormon group that, in defiance of the law, practices polygamy, with the men taking multiple wives and raising dozens of children under a single roof.
NEWS
By Scott Straus and Scott Straus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 1998
KAMPALA, Uganda -- Grace Nerima, a 30-year-old mother of four, suspected trouble when her husband stopped wanting to have sex with her. Soon he started picking fights with her over inconsequential matters. Finally he admitted that he had a girlfriend -- and wanted to take her on as his second wife.Polygamy is common in Uganda, as it is in many African countries. Estimates vary, but somewhere between 40 percent and 50 percent of married Ugandan women share their husbands with at least one "co-wife," and sometimes as many as three.
EXPLORE
June 7, 2012
Julian Bauer's May 31 letter raises some important questions. He says marriage benefits society, and therefore not everyone should be allowed to marry. He says "homosexuality ... [has] an effect on society," but the only effect he names is a supposed decline in birth rates. He doesn't explain how banning same-sex marriage would increase birth rates. Bauer says the comparison to interracial marriage is a "straw man. " He should read the arguments in Loving v. Virginia about miscegenation and God's will.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 29, 2001
BOSTON - At least Tom Green doesn't have commitment phobia. "I'm a father," he boasts. "I have a family and ... there is nothing that will keep me from my commitment." Of course there is this small catch. Tom is committed to his wives. That's wivessssss, as in plural - as in five. You might say he is "overcommitted." You might say, for that matter, that he is guilty of four counts of bigamy. This was the verdict of a Utah jury recently. They found that the Mormon father of 29 had been married to a quintet of women.
NEWS
May 13, 2007
Joseph Smith: Rough Stone Rolling by Richard Lyman Bushman The author, a practicing Mormon and an emeritus professor at Columbia University, is aware that his book stands in the intersection of faith and scholarship, but does not avoid the problematic aspects of Smith's life and work, such as his practice of polygamy, his early attempts at treasure-seeking and his later political aspirations. In the end, Smith emerges as a genuine American phenomenon, a man driven by inspiration but not unaffected by his cultural context.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | September 21, 2007
BOSTON -- I'm glad I didn't fall for the latest Internet hoax. MarryOurDaughter.com? Hello? Did the millions who clicked onto this site actually think there were parents out there putting a bridal price on the head of their 15-year-old Ashlee ($37,500) or 16-year-old Kristin ($49,995)? The hoax proved to be the brainchild of John Ordover, a Brooklyn man practicing his viral marketing skills. It was Mr. Ordover who hyped this site as an "introduction service assisting those following the biblical tradition of arranging marriages for their daughters."
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | September 21, 2007
BOSTON -- I'm glad I didn't fall for the latest Internet hoax. MarryOurDaughter.com? Hello? Did the millions who clicked onto this site actually think there were parents out there putting a bridal price on the head of their 15-year-old Ashlee ($37,500) or 16-year-old Kristin ($49,995)? The hoax proved to be the brainchild of John Ordover, a Brooklyn man practicing his viral marketing skills. It was Mr. Ordover who hyped this site as an "introduction service assisting those following the biblical tradition of arranging marriages for their daughters."
NEWS
May 13, 2007
Joseph Smith: Rough Stone Rolling by Richard Lyman Bushman The author, a practicing Mormon and an emeritus professor at Columbia University, is aware that his book stands in the intersection of faith and scholarship, but does not avoid the problematic aspects of Smith's life and work, such as his practice of polygamy, his early attempts at treasure-seeking and his later political aspirations. In the end, Smith emerges as a genuine American phenomenon, a man driven by inspiration but not unaffected by his cultural context.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 3, 2004
ELDORADO, Texas - The jokes have already started, in the cafes and on Main Street, but they draw more nervous laughter than actual merriment. Some men ask where they can apply to be a husband; others say, no thanks, one wife is trouble enough. Polygamy is funnier from afar and less so with proximity. This west-central Texas town is about to become home to about 200 members of a renegade Mormon group that, in defiance of the law, practices polygamy, with the men taking multiple wives and raising dozens of children under a single roof.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 20, 2003
Polygamy -- called "plural marriages" by its enthusiasts -- is the doctrinal issue that has precipitated the greatest resentment, rage and ridicule against the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Much else about the Mormon Church has been distressing to outsiders, including especially the intense and well-disciplined secrecy about almost every aspect of the denomination. Though nothing about the faith is simple, the polygamy controversy is surely an onerous cross -- and possibly an unfair one -- for Mormons to bear.
NEWS
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 2003
SALT LAKE CITY - The kidnapping of teen-ager Elizabeth Smart allegedly by a man who wanted her to be his "plural wife" has fueled concern in Utah over young girls' involvement in the deeply controversial practice of polygamy. Activists say that, although the circumstances of Smart's case are unique, sexual abuse of young girls and incest are common in many polygamist groups, and that enforcement of anti-polygamy laws is lax. The "tragic irony is that the horrible things that happened to her happen every day of the year to other young girls in these communities," said David Leavitt, a lawyer who prosecuted one of Utah's best-known polygamists in 2001.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 29, 2001
BOSTON - At least Tom Green doesn't have commitment phobia. "I'm a father," he boasts. "I have a family and ... there is nothing that will keep me from my commitment." Of course there is this small catch. Tom is committed to his wives. That's wivessssss, as in plural - as in five. You might say he is "overcommitted." You might say, for that matter, that he is guilty of four counts of bigamy. This was the verdict of a Utah jury recently. They found that the Mormon father of 29 had been married to a quintet of women.
FEATURES
March 22, 2001
Today in history: March 22 In 1765, Britain enacted the Stamp Act to raise money from the American colonies and repealed it the following year. In 1882, Congress outlawed polygamy. In 1895, Auguste and Louis Lumiere showed their first movie to an invited audience in Paris. In 1933, during Prohibition, President Franklin Roosevelt signed a measure to make wine and beer containing up to 3.2 percent alcohol legal. In 1941, the Grand Coulee Dam in Washington state went into operation. In 1945, the Arab League was formed with the adoption of a charter in Cairo, Egypt.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 20, 2003
Polygamy -- called "plural marriages" by its enthusiasts -- is the doctrinal issue that has precipitated the greatest resentment, rage and ridicule against the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Much else about the Mormon Church has been distressing to outsiders, including especially the intense and well-disciplined secrecy about almost every aspect of the denomination. Though nothing about the faith is simple, the polygamy controversy is surely an onerous cross -- and possibly an unfair one -- for Mormons to bear.
FEATURES
March 22, 2001
Today in history: March 22 In 1765, Britain enacted the Stamp Act to raise money from the American colonies and repealed it the following year. In 1882, Congress outlawed polygamy. In 1895, Auguste and Louis Lumiere showed their first movie to an invited audience in Paris. In 1933, during Prohibition, President Franklin Roosevelt signed a measure to make wine and beer containing up to 3.2 percent alcohol legal. In 1941, the Grand Coulee Dam in Washington state went into operation. In 1945, the Arab League was formed with the adoption of a charter in Cairo, Egypt.
NEWS
By Scott Straus and Scott Straus,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 6, 1998
KAMPALA, Uganda -- Grace Nerima, a 30-year-old mother of four, suspected trouble when her husband stopped wanting to have sex with her. Soon he started picking fights with her over inconsequential matters. Finally he admitted that he had a girlfriend -- and wanted to take her on as his second wife.Polygamy is common in Uganda, as it is in many African countries. Estimates vary, but somewhere between 40 percent and 50 percent of married Ugandan women share their husbands with at least one "co-wife," and sometimes as many as three.
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