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By SAM SESSA | March 23, 2006
Hometown -- Annapolis Current members --Julian Schmied, vocals and guitar; Stephan Kaplan, guitar; Chris Talson, bass; Matt Hammond, drums Founded in --2005 Style --indie rock Influenced by --Death Cab for Cutie, the Cure, Les Claypool, Elvis Costello, Sonic Youth, Elliott Smith, Cake, Bright Eyes Notable --Right now, the band has a self-made six-song EP called The Pavement Grave. After the show this weekend, it heads for the studio to record an LP that should be out in June, Talson said.
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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2013
A sofa cover is a quick way to give your furniture a makeover while transforming your space in the process. Try this polyester Amelie Slipcover by Surefit. The blue-and-cream-colored Amelie collection is French-inspired and mixes prints (plaid, floral and foulard patterns) for a clean finished product. Geometric and floral patterns are huge this season, and with its classic look, this piece will have staying power. The slipcovers are available in different sizes: pillows ($19.99) to full-length sofas ($99.99)
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NEWS
By Donna E. Boller Rona Hirsch | May 1, 1991
This is a tale of polyester warriors and budgetary axes and of the bard who sang their lay in the land of New Town."Once upon a time there was a little band at a high school called Wilde Lake. . . . They didn't get varsity letters, they didn't become well-known, but theyenjoyed their contributions to their school," the tale begins.The bard, Wallace "Gene" Shipp Jr., went on to tell how the band members joked about being the polyester warriors in their 15-year-olduniforms, but played their hearts out when their champions met Damascus on the field of football in November of A.D. 1990.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | August 10, 2007
An outdoor triple feature from Baltimore's connoisseur of bad taste, John Waters, is on tap tonight at Middlebranch Park, 3301 Waterview Ave. Part of the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema's Rolling Roadshow Tour, tonight's fest of Waters' best includes the nonmusical version of Hairspray (1988); Polyester (1981), an ode to life in suburbia starring Divine and Tab Hunter; and Desperate Living (1977), all about life in a garbage dump-cum-homeless shelter known as Mortville. As if that lineup isn't enough, the first 250 people to show up will get a free limited-edition Odorama card, essential for experiencing Polyester in all its glory.
FEATURES
By Jean Patteson and Jean Patteson,Orlando Sentinel | July 24, 1991
POLYESTER. It's the fiber we all love to hate, back in the '70s.Now, just as memories of slippery, sweaty blouses and clammy, tacky leisure suits are fading. . .Ta-daaah! Polyester II: The Return of the Miracle Fiber.This new, improved polyester is called microfiber. It's more expensive than the old, heavy, gummy stuff but it's also finer, softer and more luxurious. It can be made to look and feel like silk, cotton or wool. It can be blended with these natural fibers. Or it can be given the finish of suede or velvet.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | June 8, 1999
WILMINGTON, Del. -- DuPont Co., the largest U.S. chemicals company, said yesterday that it will eliminate 1,400 jobs in its money-losing polyester business, about 14 percent of the unit's work force, and cut production to save $90 million a year.The maker of Dacron polyester and Stainmaster carpet fibers said it will trim 800 DuPont positions and end contracts with other companies that affect 600 jobs. About 80 percent of the job cuts will be in North America.DuPont expects to take charges of 4 cents a share in the second quarter for severance pay and 2 cents to 4 cents a share for asset write-offs.
FEATURES
By Trish Hill and Trish Hill,N.Y. Times News Service | July 24, 1991
Theresa Jakubik, an aspiring actress in Manhattan, recently went to brunch with some people she wanted to impress. "I put on these adorable little culotte shorts," she said. But by the end of the day, she didn't look adorable. The rayon culottes were so wrinkled, she said, "I looked like I had rolled out of a 90-hour flight."It wrinkles, it's no bargain, it has to be dry-cleaned, it spots easily and trees die for its birth.This is the fabric of the 1990s?Rayon, once considered a second-class fabric to be used in lieu of silk, is showing up in every kind of clothing for both women and men. Designers talk ecstatically of its drapability, of the way it follows the line of the body.
FEATURES
By Catherine Cook and Catherine Cook,Sun Fashion Editor | September 5, 1991
Vinyl miniskirts. Rubber handbags. Plastic trim in a Chanel collection. And horror of horrors -- Calvin Klein, the king of natural fibers, using polyester. What is fashion coming to?In short, a revolution of sorts is under way: Fake fabrics are no longer considered outcasts. Fancy clothing boutiques that once prided themselves on offering only 100 percent natural fibers have been letting in greater numbers of synthetics -- and with increasingly positive responses from customers who like the looks and easy maintenance of the newest polyesters.
FEATURES
By Glenn Lovell and Glenn Lovell,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 11, 2003
John Waters vs. the Rugrats? This unlikely tussle between Baltimore's king of camp and Nickelodeon's cartoon franchise could be coming to a courthouse near you in the coming months. Rugrats Go Wild, an animated feature that opens Friday, is being shown in "Odorama" with scratch-and-sniff cards. The word "Odorama," first advertised as part of Waters' 1981 comedy Polyester, is a registered trademark - and Waters is hopping mad that Nickelodeon and Paramount Pictures, partners on the Rugrats movie, didn't clear it with him first.
FEATURES
By Jeffrey Ball and Jeffrey Ball,Knight-Ridder News Service | October 27, 1993
Barreling down the highway in his eight-cylinder black Mustang, radar detector aglow and cellular phone by his side, Steven King hardly cuts the image of an ecological crusader.But looks can be deceiving. Consider the clothing on the 26-year-old entrepreneur's back.What appears to be a normal T-shirt in fact contains the remains of about five plastic soda bottles. It's among a growing array of garments made from recycled polyester.The clothing, manufactured in North Carolina and sold by several companies nationwide, is targeted at the growing number of environmentally conscious consumers.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | November 24, 2006
Microfiber is weaving its way through our lives. It's in the chamois that dries your car and the bath towel that dries your body. It's in dress shirts, underwear, surf shorts, hiking boots, raincoats, sofas, hospital mops and surgical masks. In October, the ubiquitous fiber crossed a new frontier: The National Basketball Association announced that it would replace the traditional leather that covers the league's basketballs - a change that outraged purists. So what is this stuff? And why the hoopla?
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | May 14, 2006
Is polyester a protected class? I ask because PSC Chairman Kenneth Schisler testified at a legislative hearing the other day that he fired the commission's chief engineer, in part, for wearing a "dorky, '70s-era tie." I consulted two experts in labor law. Their verdict? Bad news for disco diehards. "Wearing polyester is not protected by law," said Robert Kellner, chairman of the employment law practice group at Gordon, Feinblatt. "At-will" employees can be fired in Maryland for any reason, except an illegal one, such as age, race, religion, sexual orientation, he said.
NEWS
By ABIGAIL TUCKER and ABIGAIL TUCKER,SUN REPORTER | March 29, 2006
The mercury is stalled near 40 degrees, but Anne Offermann is the very vision of spring as she picks her way through the parks of Mount Vernon Place in a pale lemon jacket so thin it's almost see-through, featherweight khakis and a wide-brimmed straw visor. Yet now, as the wind rakes frozen fingers through just-blossomed cherry trees, she barely shivers. Her sartorial strategy? "Long underwear," she says, hiking up a cuff to reveal an ankle armored in thick black fabric. Offermann is visiting from the harsh climate of Buffalo, N.Y., but even she is unsure how to dress for the atmospheric free-for-all that is Baltimore's early spring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | March 23, 2006
Hometown -- Annapolis Current members --Julian Schmied, vocals and guitar; Stephan Kaplan, guitar; Chris Talson, bass; Matt Hammond, drums Founded in --2005 Style --indie rock Influenced by --Death Cab for Cutie, the Cure, Les Claypool, Elvis Costello, Sonic Youth, Elliott Smith, Cake, Bright Eyes Notable --Right now, the band has a self-made six-song EP called The Pavement Grave. After the show this weekend, it heads for the studio to record an LP that should be out in June, Talson said.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | June 12, 2005
Kids are fickle, their tastes ever-changing. One week, they're smitten with ponies, the next they're all about trains. So as a parent, you're challenged to keep up -- and, of course, to placate their whims. You'll, at least, have an easier time of decorating the kids' walls with Eisenhart Wallcoverings' new Just Imagine! line of children's wallpaper, appropriate for infants through 'tweens. The new collection is printed on Paperez (pronounced paper-ease), an easy-on, easy-off wall covering that goes on dry, and can be quickly removed.
FEATURES
By Glenn Lovell and Glenn Lovell,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 11, 2003
John Waters vs. the Rugrats? This unlikely tussle between Baltimore's king of camp and Nickelodeon's cartoon franchise could be coming to a courthouse near you in the coming months. Rugrats Go Wild, an animated feature that opens Friday, is being shown in "Odorama" with scratch-and-sniff cards. The word "Odorama," first advertised as part of Waters' 1981 comedy Polyester, is a registered trademark - and Waters is hopping mad that Nickelodeon and Paramount Pictures, partners on the Rugrats movie, didn't clear it with him first.
FEATURES
March 27, 1991
Style in the '60s stretched to the max. Artist Peter Max was the inspiration for a run of psychedelic polyester prints that were worn with great glare by the young and the hip.Emilio Pucci created refined prints for ladies who shopped the boutiques. Everything was bright and beautiful.After decades of muted shades, color has popped back into fashion and store racks are looking like rainbows.This is the season to pop for something bright -- hot pink, fuchsia, turquoise, canary yellow, lime green -- in separate pieces or all together.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | November 24, 2006
Microfiber is weaving its way through our lives. It's in the chamois that dries your car and the bath towel that dries your body. It's in dress shirts, underwear, surf shorts, hiking boots, raincoats, sofas, hospital mops and surgical masks. In October, the ubiquitous fiber crossed a new frontier: The National Basketball Association announced that it would replace the traditional leather that covers the league's basketballs - a change that outraged purists. So what is this stuff? And why the hoopla?
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | April 15, 2003
WILMINGTON, Del. - DuPont Co., the second-largest U.S. chemical maker, said it has a potential buyer for its nylon and polyester business, which analysts estimate might fetch $5 billion. The company didn't identify the possible bidder. Closely held Koch Industries Inc. is the most likely buyer, said Bear, Stearns & Co. analyst Frank Mitsch. Koch is looking for acquisitions and won't comment on the DuPont line, a spokeswoman said. DuPont is getting rid of the unit, which also makes Lycra stretch fiber, because the subsidiary has struggled with competition from low-cost producers.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 8, 2000
IKNOW OF no one who could more elegantly slide a chair from under a table and seat a woman in a restaurant than Hans Kramm, bon vivant, maitre d', actor and maybe the most charming man in Charm City. Debonair, dapper, witty and playful, Kramm, who was born in Germany and came to America in the 1950s, seemed like a baron in exile, especially when he waxed his handlebar mustache, wore a monocle and clicked his heels. Years ago, he worked as manager in bygone restaurants - the Circle One, the revolving dining room atop the downtown Holiday Inn, and a Towson place called Tom Jones.
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