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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2002
Property slated for a housing project at Fort Meade contains some hazardous materials but is suitable for redevelopment, according to environmental documents that the Army released yesterday. After initially declining to provide the reports to a review board and The Sun, Army officials released yesterday several studies conducted months ago on land that Fort Meade is leasing to a private company. The contractor plans to build about 3,000 houses for soldiers there. The documents confirm the presence of asbestos, radon and lead-based paint at the property on the post's north side.
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BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN REPORTER | November 30, 2007
A retired Navy hospital ship, abandoned by its previous owner and ostensibly bound for Greece under a new buyer, must remain in Baltimore's harbor after the Environmental Protection Agency obtained a warrant this week to search it for toxic chemicals and secured an injunction barring it from being exported. The multiweek delay will cost new owner Potomac Navigation Inc. hundreds of thousands of dollars, according to documents filed in U.S. District Court in Baltimore. The company bought the vessel Sanctuary for $50,000 through a court-ordered auction in August.
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NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2002
The Environmental Protection Agency is expected to announce today that it is adding the Coast Guard Yard in Curtis Bay to its Superfund list of the nation's cleanup priorities. The listing, which has been expected since the EPA recommended adding the site to Superfund last September, will ensure the yard undergoes a thorough study to determine the scope of the contamination, which dates to World War II. "It means it will receive a very thorough remedial investigation and feasibility study to determine the nature and the extent of contamination," said EPA spokesman David Sternberg.
NEWS
By Dan Lamothe and Dan Lamothe,Sun Reporter | June 27, 2007
The Coast Guard plans to take no action to clean up the first of seven contaminated sites at its yard on Curtis Bay. A proposed new remediation plan - the first completed for the Superfund site - found that though cyanide, lead and other dangerous substances remain in the sediment under dry docks on the property, the level are too low to warrant concern. "It's an acceptable risk," Robert DeMarco, environmental engineer for the yard, said yesterday. "The numbers are decided by the [Environmental Protection Agency]
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | August 8, 1991
The City of Baltimore has been ordered to clean up toxic wastes discovered behind a Brooklyn Park cemetery last winter, a spokesman for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said.The city must removeat least 60 decaying chemical drums as well as contaminated soil from an 86-acre dump at the end of Snow Hill Lane, north of the Beltway,said EPA spokesman David Sternberg.The city owns 3,000 square feet along the eastern edge, inside its Pennington Avenue Landfill, Sternberg said.The EPA began the clean up in February after discovering alarmingly high levels of lead, which can cause brain damage, in the soil.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff writer | July 10, 1991
The discovery of toxic chemicals has complicated the county's disposal of 100,000 gallons of sludge removed from two illegal sewage lagoons in Gambrills.Laboratory tests show the sludge contains low levels of volatile organic chemicals and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), both more typically found in industrial rather than residential waste, said a Department of Utilities spokeswoman.Heavy metals were also found.Utilities officials are leery ofsending the tainted sludge through the Cox Creek Waste Water Treatment plant as originally planned, said spokeswoman Jody Vollmar.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | November 25, 1993
Contamination by PCBs in a load of waste oil that was to burn in the kilns at Lehigh Portland Cement prompted the plant to suspend the burning of that fuel Nov. 12, said David H. Roush, manager of the Union Bridge plant.Early Nov. 12, a load of 5,000 gallons of waste oil was delivered to Lehigh and blended into about 195,000 gallons of waste oil already in the storage tank at Lehigh, Mr. Roush said.Laboratory tests done at the time showed a level of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) higher than state and federal guidelines allow.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2002
Property slated for a housing project at Fort Meade contains some hazardous materials but is suitable for redevelopment, according to environmental documents that the Army released yesterday. After initially declining to provide the reports to a review board and The Sun, Army officials released yesterday several studies conducted months ago on land that Fort Meade is leasing to a private company. The contractor plans to build about 3,000 houses for soldiers there. The documents confirm the presence of asbestos, radon and lead-based paint at the property on the post's north side.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1997
A state inspector formally warned a Curtis Bay industrial contractor yesterday to clean up hazardous material illegally stored at its site by next week or face sanctions that could include up to $50,000 in fines if the company is convicted of criminal charges.It was the second time in three months that state environmental officials had ordered McShane Inc. to dispose of a drum containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), which are carcinogenic.In early June, a state Department of Environment inspector found a drum containing PCBs on the site in the 600 block of Pittman Road and gave McShane 90 days to dispose of it, said Quentin Banks, a department spokesman.
NEWS
By Dan Lamothe and Dan Lamothe,Sun Reporter | June 27, 2007
The Coast Guard plans to take no action to clean up the first of seven contaminated sites at its yard on Curtis Bay. A proposed new remediation plan - the first completed for the Superfund site - found that though cyanide, lead and other dangerous substances remain in the sediment under dry docks on the property, the level are too low to warrant concern. "It's an acceptable risk," Robert DeMarco, environmental engineer for the yard, said yesterday. "The numbers are decided by the [Environmental Protection Agency]
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | June 29, 2004
Spurred by growing concerns about cancer among former Anne Arundel firefighters, state and county health officials have contracted with a Johns Hopkins University epidemiologist to investigate possible links between past working conditions and the reported illnesses. Several former firefighters have speculated that their illnesses are connected to the burning of toxic transformer oil at the county's fire training academy in the 1970s and 1980s, said Kenneth Berman, an attorney representing some firefighters.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | September 5, 2002
The Environmental Protection Agency is expected to announce today that it is adding the Coast Guard Yard in Curtis Bay to its Superfund list of the nation's cleanup priorities. The listing, which has been expected since the EPA recommended adding the site to Superfund last September, will ensure the yard undergoes a thorough study to determine the scope of the contamination, which dates to World War II. "It means it will receive a very thorough remedial investigation and feasibility study to determine the nature and the extent of contamination," said EPA spokesman David Sternberg.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2002
Property slated for a housing project at Fort Meade contains some hazardous materials but is suitable for redevelopment, according to environmental documents that the Army released yesterday. After initially declining to provide the reports to a review board and The Sun, Army officials released yesterday several studies conducted months ago on land that Fort Meade is leasing to a private company. The contractor plans to build about 3,000 houses for soldiers there. The documents confirm the presence of asbestos, radon and lead-based paint at the property on the post's north side.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2002
Property slated for a housing project at Fort Meade contains some hazardous materials but is suitable for redevelopment, according to environmental documents that the Army released yesterday. After initially declining to provide the reports to a review board and The Sun, Army officials released yesterday several studies conducted months ago on land that Fort Meade is leasing to a private company. The contractor plans to build about 3,000 houses for soldiers there. The documents confirm the presence of asbestos, radon and lead-based paint at the property on the post's north side.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 5, 1999
NEW YORK -- For the first time in two decades, New York state environmental scientists have found that chemical contamination in striped bass from the lower reaches of the Hudson River has dropped to levels deemed safe to eat by the federal government.In a recent study, staff scientists with the Environmental Conservation Department concluded that the drop was large enough for state officials to consider ending a 23-year-old ban on commercial netting of the fish, a state law that has nearly eliminated a centuries-old traditional springtime harvest of stripers and shad along the river banks.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | December 30, 1997
Two days before a state inspector was due in for an announced spot check this summer, a north Anne Arundel County industrial construction company hurriedly disposed of waste materials, ordering a crew to dig a hole and bury them, current and former employees say.The Maryland Department of the Environment and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are investigating McShane Inc., at 605 Pittman Road just south of Baltimore, for possible illegal storage of...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 5, 1999
NEW YORK -- For the first time in two decades, New York state environmental scientists have found that chemical contamination in striped bass from the lower reaches of the Hudson River has dropped to levels deemed safe to eat by the federal government.In a recent study, staff scientists with the Environmental Conservation Department concluded that the drop was large enough for state officials to consider ending a 23-year-old ban on commercial netting of the fish, a state law that has nearly eliminated a centuries-old traditional springtime harvest of stripers and shad along the river banks.
NEWS
By Karen Masterson and Karen Masterson,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1997
A group of East Baltimore investors is trying to buy a toxic waste dump adjacent to Patterson High School and turn it into a driving range for golfers.The site at Kane and Lombard streets, a few miles from downtown, has a 10-acre protective cap and slurry walls designed to contain contaminants.Although questions remain as to how contained those hazardous soils are, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency believes a driving range would pose no threat to the site or to would-be golfers.Richard W. Sandza, publisher of the East Baltimore Guide, said he and other East Baltimore investors would provide at least $100,000 for the project, which would transform the dormant lot into a 40-tee driving range.
NEWS
By Karen Masterson and Karen Masterson,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1997
A group of East Baltimore investors is trying to buy a toxic waste dump adjacent to Patterson High School and turn it into a driving range for golfers.The site at Kane and Lombard streets, a few miles from downtown, has a 10-acre protective cap and slurry walls designed to contain contaminants.Although questions remain as to how contained those hazardous soils are, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency believes a driving range would pose no threat to the site or to would-be golfers.Richard W. Sandza, publisher of the East Baltimore Guide, said he and other East Baltimore investors would provide at least $100,000 for the project, which would transform the dormant lot into a 40-tee driving range.
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