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By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | April 22, 1994
The seven-week strike at Poly-Seal Corp., a Baltimore-based maker of plastic caps and seals, ended yesterday after workers accepted a new three-year contract that is only slightly different than one they had earlier rejected.The provisions of the contract are similar to those turned downlast week, except the new contract includes a cap on increases in health insurance payments by workers and commits the union and the company to try to find a less expensive health care plan, said Eugene W. Dorr, staff representative of the United Steelworkers of America District 8.The vote to ratify the contract was 189 to 79, Mr. Dorr said.
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BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1999
Take a look in the pantries or medicine cabinets of a typical home and chances are you'll find at least 10 products made by Poly-Seal Corp., the Baltimore manufacturer that's rebounding from a fatal outbreak of Legionnaires' disease in its Portal Street factory last year. The ubiquitousness of the company's work is hardly surprising. Poly-Seal's factory annually churns out nearly 2.5 billion plastic caps, lids and spouts for such household names as Clorox, Clairol, Arm and Hammer, Murphy's Oil Soap, Prestone and Utz. "Either by product-line or size, we have the largest line of stock [standard-size]
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BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | April 14, 1994
Striking workers rejected Poly-Seal Corp.'s latest contract offer yesterday, and the maker of plastic caps and container seals said it will begin hiring permanent replacements."
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1998
The mantra at Poly-Seal Corp. yesterday was "spick-and-span" as company officials and the state health department reassured returning workers that the plant is safe, even as a new case of Legionnaires' disease was confirmed Tuesday.Five Poly-Seal employees have contracted the disease, including 51-year-old Joenell Fisher, who died Oct. 1. Another two workers caught pneumonia, which is often the first stage of the disease.The entire plant in Holabird Business Park in Baltimore had been closed for remediation since Saturday.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | January 23, 1991
For years, the people at Baltimore's Standard Cap & Molding Co. fought a losing battle against corporate giants such as the Monsanto Co. as they scrabbled to find some way to make money producing plastic bottles.But in 1969, the company gave up on dreams of soaring into success in the booming plastic-bottle business. New managers came in while the company was in bankruptcy and decided that this time, the plastics company would remain content to think small.Very small.The newly renamed Poly-Seal Corp.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF Staff writer Joe Mathews contributed to this article | October 8, 1998
Poly-Seal Corp., the Baltimore plastics company partially shut down because of suspected Legionnaires' disease, likely possesses the reputation and financial strength to weather this affair, experts said yesterday."
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1998
The mantra at Poly-Seal Corp. yesterday was "spick-and-span" as company officials and the state health department reassured returning workers that the plant is safe, even as a new case of Legionnaires' disease was confirmed Tuesday.Five Poly-Seal employees have contracted the disease, including 51-year-old Joenell Fisher, who died Oct. 1. Another two workers caught pneumonia, which is often the first stage of the disease.The entire plant in Holabird Business Park in Baltimore had been closed for remediation since Saturday.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1998
A few minutes before 8 a.m. yesterday, Margaret Prescoe stared hard at the entrance to the Poly-Seal Corp. factory and asked herself if she dared walk inside and go to work.For 23 years, Prescoe, a machine operator at the Southeast Baltimore plastics factory, had come to work without a second thought.But last Thursday night, her friend and co-worker Joenell Fisher died from Legionnaires' disease.And this week, Poly-Seal shut down a third of the plant and announced it was investigating whether Fisher and other employees had contracted the sometimes-fatal disease from contamination in the factory.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1998
Poly-Seal Corp., the Baltimore plastics firm that partially shut down after a fatal outbreak of Legionnaires' disease last week, will restart operations tomorrow, an official said."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Joe Mathews and Scott Shane and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1998
As medical detectives searched a Southeast Baltimore plastics factory yesterday for a microscopic killer, Maryland health officials confirmed three cases of Legionnaires' disease among the plant's workers, including a 51-year-old jazz singer who died last week.Six more workers at the Poly-Seal Corp. suffered respiratory illness, including three who had pneumonia, but tests to confirm that they were infected with the Legionella pneumophila bacteria are not complete, said Dr. Diane Dwyer, chief epidemiologist for the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1998
Poly-Seal Corp., the Baltimore plastics firm that partially shut down after a fatal outbreak of Legionnaires' disease last week, will restart operations tomorrow, an official said."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1998
As health officials identified a fourth case of Legionnaires' disease yesterday among employees of a Southeast Baltimore plastics plant, Poly-Seal Corp. announced it will close the factory this morning to disinfect its water systems.The factory's five water systems will be flushed with very hot water and high concentrations of chlorine to make certain that no Legionella pneumophila bacteria remain, said Levi Rabinowitz, a media consultant hired by Poly-Seal to speak for the company.Waterchem, an Aberdeen company that maintains the plant's water systems, will coordinate the cleanup.
NEWS
October 8, 1998
A front-page article yesterday incorrectly reported the date Poly-Seal Corp. alerted health authorities to an outbreak of Legionnaire's disease among its employees. The company contacted health officials Friday after learning that an employee had died and others appeared to have similar illnesses.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 10/08/98
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1998
A few minutes before 8 a.m. yesterday, Margaret Prescoe stared hard at the entrance to the Poly-Seal Corp. factory and asked herself if she dared walk inside and go to work.For 23 years, Prescoe, a machine operator at the Southeast Baltimore plastics factory, had come to work without a second thought.But last Thursday night, her friend and co-worker Joenell Fisher died from Legionnaires' disease.And this week, Poly-Seal shut down a third of the plant and announced it was investigating whether Fisher and other employees had contracted the sometimes-fatal disease from contamination in the factory.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF Staff writer Joe Mathews contributed to this article | October 8, 1998
Poly-Seal Corp., the Baltimore plastics company partially shut down because of suspected Legionnaires' disease, likely possesses the reputation and financial strength to weather this affair, experts said yesterday."
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Joe Mathews and Scott Shane and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | October 8, 1998
As medical detectives searched a Southeast Baltimore plastics factory yesterday for a microscopic killer, Maryland health officials confirmed three cases of Legionnaires' disease among the plant's workers, including a 51-year-old jazz singer who died last week.Six more workers at the Poly-Seal Corp. suffered respiratory illness, including three who had pneumonia, but tests to confirm that they were infected with the Legionella pneumophila bacteria are not complete, said Dr. Diane Dwyer, chief epidemiologist for the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1997
Poly-Seal Corp., a Baltimore maker of plastic caps and seals, yesterday said it will close a plant on Shannan Drive in Baltimore and lay off about 45 of its 147 workers."
NEWS
October 8, 1998
A front-page article yesterday incorrectly reported the date Poly-Seal Corp. alerted health authorities to an outbreak of Legionnaire's disease among its employees. The company contacted health officials Friday after learning that an employee had died and others appeared to have similar illnesses.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 10/08/98
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Dennis O'Brien contributed to this article | October 7, 1998
One worker at a Southeast Baltimore plant has died of suspected Legionnaires' disease and eight others have developed possibly related respiratory illnesses, forcing the company to shut down more than a third of its plant while the state health department investigates the outbreak.Poly-Seal Corp., a maker of plastic caps and seals, has laid off about 250 workers -- roughly half its work force -- while the plant is partly closed during the investigation.It could take a "couple of weeks" for the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to investigate, health and company officials said yesterday at a news conference at the plant in the Holabird Industrial Park.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1997
Poly-Seal Corp., a Baltimore maker of plastic caps and seals, yesterday said it will close a plant on Shannan Drive in Baltimore and lay off about 45 of its 147 workers."
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