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By PETER A. JAY | July 28, 1994
This is an unsettling time for parents whose children are zTC getting ready to go away to college for the first time this fall. By now, the invoice for the first semester's tuition has arrived. Especially if the pride and joy is to attend one of the more expensive schools, this bill is for quite a lot of money. There are seven more such bills ahead. The cumulative amount is, well, like awesome, man.Nationally, the number of graduating high school seniors has dipped, and colleges are competing vigorously for students.
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NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | July 28, 1994
This is an unsettling time for parents whose children are zTC getting ready to go away to college for the first time this fall. By now, the invoice for the first semester's tuition has arrived. Especially if the pride and joy is to attend one of the more expensive schools, this bill is for quite a lot of money. There are seven more such bills ahead. The cumulative amount is, well, like awesome, man.Nationally, the number of graduating high school seniors has dipped, and colleges are competing vigorously for students.
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NEWS
By Clancy Sigal | July 27, 1992
GEORGE Orwell was convinced that corrupt language -- inflated imagery, stale metaphors, meaningless words -- corrupted thought.As I watched the Democratic convention, his ghost reminded me that "euphemism, question-begging and a sheer cloudy vagueness" in political language was not unique to Britain in the 1930s.Am I the only left-leaning progressive who feels asphyxiated every time Bill Clinton makes a speech?Forget Al Gore, who has so mastered Non-Speak that a pharmaceutical company should buy the rights to him as a non-addictive alternative to Seconal.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | July 5, 1994
In celebration of its 10th anniversary, Shakespeare on Wheels has mounted the most famous, most produced play by Shakespeare -- or, for that matter, by any playwright -- "Hamlet."And, under Sam McCready's direction, this traveling troupe of the University of Maryland Baltimore County has come up with a credible, if much abridged, production.Although it is almost never performed uncut, the full-length "Hamlet" runs approximately five hours. McCready's version comes closer to two-and-a-quarter hours (including intermission)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | July 5, 1994
In celebration of its 10th anniversary, Shakespeare on Wheels has mounted the most famous, most produced play by Shakespeare -- or, for that matter, by any playwright -- "Hamlet."And, under Sam McCready's direction, this traveling troupe of the University of Maryland Baltimore County has come up with a credible, if much abridged, production.Although it is almost never performed uncut, the full-length "Hamlet" runs approximately five hours. McCready's version comes closer to two-and-a-quarter hours (including intermission)
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,States News Service | March 19, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Was Hamlet a crafty schemer who faked madness to save his own Danish skin, or was he just a sick prince in need of psychiatric help?That, as the troubled youth might say, is the question.And this week, the U.S. Supreme Court provided an answer. With Justice Anthony Kennedy presiding, a jury was asked to decide whether William Shakespeare's tragic hero was mentally fit to stand trial for the murder of Polonius, a court adviser.Members of the Shakespeare Theatre's Lawyers Committee's heard Hamlet's case at their annual dinner in Washington Thursday night, mulling over the use of the insanity defense in between bites of dilled shrimp and Gravalax mousse balls.
NEWS
By A. M. Rosenthal | December 27, 1990
FOR AT least two years, warnings came constantly from Soviet citizens at home or traveling abroad. They said that under Mikhail Gorbachev their country was headed for disaster and dictatorship.ZTC In the past six months or so, every day brought news about Stalinists and fascists in the military, the KGB, and the government growing more ferocious in their demands A.M.Rosenthalfor crackdown.All the while, Gorbachev drew closer to the KGB and strengthened it. He delivered annoyed threats against the pesky democrats -- the only hope to bring about the end of Soviet communism.
NEWS
By Marjorie Garber | April 2, 1992
HAMLET: Do you see yonder cloud that's almost in shape of a camel?Polonius: By th' mass and 'tis -- like a camel indeed.Hamlet: Methinks it is like a weasel.Polonius: It is backed like a weasel.Hamlet: Or like a whale.Polonius: Very like a whale.The surgeon general, Dr. Antonia Novello, and the American Medical Association (AMA) have called for the removal of Joe Camel from billboards and printed ads because the Camel cigarette character with the long sleek snout is "too seductive for children."
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | July 22, 2006
While he was chewing on a luncheon roll and discussing the current crisis between Hezbollah and Israel at a meeting this week with world leaders at the G-8 summit in St. Petersburg, Russia, a microphone picked up President Bush using a well-known barnyard epithet with British Prime Minister Tony Blair. Presidents, who at times forget they're mere mortals like the rest of us, can be and often are vulgar and profane in private and public, like the rest of us. "With all due respect, it's like Bush has no dignity," said Russell Baker, who covered the Eisenhower administration for the New York Times, and later wrote the nationally syndicated "Observer" column until retiring in 1998.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media services | June 10, 2007
When Polonius in Shakespeare's play Hamlet said, "Neither a borrower nor a lender be," he was a fortunate man. He did not have a student loan, revolving credit debt, a car loan, a home equity loan or a mortgage. In today's society, young people are weaned early on credit dependency: Credit-card issuers can snare them before high school graduation, stepping up pressure at college orientation. Issuers bet mom and dad will step in with the cash if the student falls too far in the hole. Too often parents and children view approval of a college loan with the same gusto as a college scholarship or money saved for college.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,States News Service | March 19, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Was Hamlet a crafty schemer who faked madness to save his own Danish skin, or was he just a sick prince in need of psychiatric help?That, as the troubled youth might say, is the question.And this week, the U.S. Supreme Court provided an answer. With Justice Anthony Kennedy presiding, a jury was asked to decide whether William Shakespeare's tragic hero was mentally fit to stand trial for the murder of Polonius, a court adviser.Members of the Shakespeare Theatre's Lawyers Committee's heard Hamlet's case at their annual dinner in Washington Thursday night, mulling over the use of the insanity defense in between bites of dilled shrimp and Gravalax mousse balls.
NEWS
By Clancy Sigal | July 27, 1992
GEORGE Orwell was convinced that corrupt language -- inflated imagery, stale metaphors, meaningless words -- corrupted thought.As I watched the Democratic convention, his ghost reminded me that "euphemism, question-begging and a sheer cloudy vagueness" in political language was not unique to Britain in the 1930s.Am I the only left-leaning progressive who feels asphyxiated every time Bill Clinton makes a speech?Forget Al Gore, who has so mastered Non-Speak that a pharmaceutical company should buy the rights to him as a non-addictive alternative to Seconal.
NEWS
By A. M. Rosenthal | December 27, 1990
FOR AT least two years, warnings came constantly from Soviet citizens at home or traveling abroad. They said that under Mikhail Gorbachev their country was headed for disaster and dictatorship.ZTC In the past six months or so, every day brought news about Stalinists and fascists in the military, the KGB, and the government growing more ferocious in their demands A.M.Rosenthalfor crackdown.All the while, Gorbachev drew closer to the KGB and strengthened it. He delivered annoyed threats against the pesky democrats -- the only hope to bring about the end of Soviet communism.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | November 2, 1990
There is one major problem with the "Great Performances" staging of "Hamlet" at 9 tonight on MPT (Channels 22 and 67): Kevin Kline borrows too much from the 1948 film performance of Laurence Olivier.Who wouldn't, you say.Who wouldn't, indeed. But Olivier, great as he was, was never very good on television. His best work simply played too big for the smaller and more intimate television screen. He was too big in gesture, voice and presence.One of the ways Olivier so effectively communicated the anguish of the young prince, for example, was through speeches where his cadence would pick up speed and the voice would rise until it was up an octave or more and starting to crack into a kind of banshee wail.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2009
The Naval Academy's Mahan Hall rocked with laughter last weekend as the midshipmen of the Masqueraders displayed their comedic mastery in Lee Blessing's "Fortinbras." This 1991 political satire, which ran for two weekends, picks up where Shakespeare's "Hamlet" leaves off. The play opens with the mortally wounded Hamlet willing his kingdom to the prince Fortinbras and commanding his friend Horatio to relate his story to the world. Soon after Hamlet dies, Fortinbras arrives to find several expired royals lying about in need of disposal.
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