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NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | September 10, 1992
Pamela Basu may have helped us all breathe more easily.Her graduate research into air pollution control had received international attention.The promise of a blossoming professional career had barely begun when the 34-year-old chemist died violently Tuesday near her Savage home as she was dragged along by her car at the hands of abductors.Wherever she worked or studied, she tempered the seriousness of her work with her smile and easy laugh, say those who worked with her.Those responsible for bearing news of the tragedy to fellow workers and former colleagues said they were surprised at the number of people whose lives she touched.
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NEWS
October 7, 2014
It is time to plug the loopholes for coal-fired power plants in Maryland ( "New coal plant pollution controls eyed," Sept. 13). A report by the Maryland Department of the Environment found that many of the coal fired power plants in Maryland had not used their pollution controls continuously. If the Brandon Shores and Wagner plants had used their controls continuously in 2012, they could have cut nitrous oxide emissions by 2,000 tons. So what's the problem with nitrous oxide?
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BUSINESS
By Greg Schneider and Greg Schneider,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1999
Environmental Elements Corp. said yesterday that it will begin trading on the American Stock Exchange instead of the New York Stock Exchange on Nov. 1, and that it expects to post a loss for the second quarter of its fiscal year.The Baltimore-based pollution control company is making the market switch because it does not expect to meet a new NYSE criterion that requires member companies to have market capitalization and shareholder equity of at least $50 million within one year."It's the equity component, not the market cap component, that causes the problem," said E. H. Verdery, chairman and chief executive officer.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
The Maryland Department of the Environment recently revealed a draft rule that would finally require coal-powered plants in the Baltimore-Washington region to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions by 48 percent over the next four years ( "New coal plant pollution controls eyed," Sept. 13). Nitrogen oxides contribute heavily to the formation of ground-level ozone (smog) and seriously exacerbate cardiopulmonary health problems such as asthma. Smog is worse when air is still and hot, but 2014 has been relatively cool so there have been fewer "orange alerts" for dangerous air. But Maryland still has some of the worst air on the Eastern seaboard, due largely to coal.
NEWS
November 2, 1997
VOLUNTARY MEANS mandatory in the proposal for state farmers to limit animal manure pollution of Maryland waters. If farmers don't adopt and implement an acceptable manure management plan, the state must impose such requirements, regardless of political backlash.While the governor's commission debates the ways to regulate farm runoff of manure and chemical fertilizers, there is general agreement that livestock farms are a major contributor to Chesapeake Bay pollution. Scientific evidence suggests the microorganism Pfiesteria piscicida thrives on excessive farm runoff in the waters, even if its toxic secretion is directly stimulated by the presence of fish.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2003
Environmental Elements Corp., a Baltimore air pollution control equipment maker hit by plunging sales, said yesterday that its top executive had departed and that 20 workers, or 13 percent of its work force, are being cut. John L. Sams resigned as the company's president, chief executive officer and board member effective immediately, the company announced in a statement. Chief Financial Officer Lawrence Rychlak was named interim president, the statement said. The statement said the company would take a charge of $140,000 in the current quarter for severance and other costs.
BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | May 18, 2000
Environmental Elements Corp., a struggling pollution-control company in Baltimore, said yesterday that it expects its fourth-quarter loss to widen to about $3.5 million, more than double the amount it had said it was expecting. The company also expects to lay off more of its 120 workers, in addition to 30 layoffs last month, said James B. Sinclair, EEC's chief financial officer. The company had reported earlier that it expected a loss of $1.4 million, or 20 cents per share, for the fiscal quarter that ended March 31. The net loss is expected to widen to about 49 cents per share, primarily because of reduced profit expectations on existing projects, delays on earnings from contracts and a bigger one-time charge related to severance and early retirement costs.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 28, 2012
Two Baltimore groups were among 10 around the Chesapeake Bay receiving $376,000 Wednesday to "green" their communities while also providing job training. Belair-Edison Neighborhoods Inc. and Southeast Community Development Corp. were awarded a combined $102,000 under the Environmental Protection Agency 's " Green Streets-Green Jobs-Green Towns " initiative. Under the program, local governments and nonprofit organizations can get grants for projects involving tree-plantings and other measures to reduce storm-water washing into local waters.  Assistance is also provided to train people in constructing such projects.
BUSINESS
By William Patalon III and William Patalon III,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1998
Environmental Elements Corp., an engineering and project-management boutique focusing on the pollution-control business, reported second-quarter earnings yesterday that underscored the continuing turnaround of a company with a 50-year history in Baltimore.EEC said it earned $346,000, or 5 cents a share, for its fiscal second quarter, which ended Sept. 30, compared with profit of PTC $28,000, or break-even per share, for the same three months last year.Revenue jumped 81 percent for the quarter to $20.8 million this year compared with $11.5 million last year.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 19, 2005
WASHINGTON - The chairman of a Senate committee that oversees environmental issues has directed two national organizations that oppose President Bush's major clean-air initiative to turn over their financial and tax records to the Senate. Sen. James M. Inhofe, an Oklahoma Republican who heads the Environment and Public Works Committee, asked for the documents 10 days after a representative of the two groups criticized the Clear Skies proposal before a Senate subcommittee. Inhofe is the leading sponsor of the administration bill, which is deadlocked in his panel.
NEWS
Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Looking to protect Marylanders from unsafe levels of smog, environmental regulators are moving to clamp down on pollution from the state's smaller coal-burning power plants, but plant owners warn that the rule could have economic consequences. The Maryland Department of the Environment recently unveiled a draft rule two years in the planning that would require coal-burning plants in the Baltimore and Washington areas to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides by 48 percent over the next four years.
NEWS
By Gerald W. Winegrad | December 15, 2013
Thirty years ago, the governors in Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania; the mayor of D.C.; and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency administrator signed the first Chesapeake Bay Agreement, solemnly pledging to stem the flow of pollutants and bring the bay into compliance with the Clean Water Act. As a state senator, I optimistically witnessed this event and thought the job would be done in a decade. But today - after more detailed pledges to reduce nutrients, sediment and toxic chemicals - we are still far from meeting these commitments.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | May 31, 2013
Unhappy over a state law requiring property owners to pay a new fee to help clean up the Chesapeake Bay, Frederick County officials have decided to set the charge at just a penny a year. The county's board of commissioners approved the 1-cent storm-water pollution control fee on Thursday, declaring they were doing even that only to avoid possible state restrictions on new development in the county if they didn't act. "We are being forced to charge this fee, so we decided to keep it at one cent just to meet the letter of the law," Blaine Young, president of the county commissioners, said in a press release announcing the action.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | June 28, 2012
Two Baltimore groups were among 10 around the Chesapeake Bay receiving $376,000 Wednesday to "green" their communities while also providing job training. Belair-Edison Neighborhoods Inc. and Southeast Community Development Corp. were awarded a combined $102,000 under the Environmental Protection Agency 's " Green Streets-Green Jobs-Green Towns " initiative. Under the program, local governments and nonprofit organizations can get grants for projects involving tree-plantings and other measures to reduce storm-water washing into local waters.  Assistance is also provided to train people in constructing such projects.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | September 29, 2011
Why are power plants worth more than the health of 140,000 Maryland children afflicted with asthma? What about pregnant women eating mercury-tainted fish from the Chesapeake Bay? How could their risk be scored so low compared to a utility plant's profit? And what of the boaters, watermen, crab house owners and all the others whose livelihoods depend on a healthy Chesapeake? Why should their interests come behind the mostly out-of-state industries that don't want to meet tougher federal clean air regulations?
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2011
Maryland got an infusion of $2 million in federal funds Friday to pay state farmers to plant cover crops in winter, replacing state money cut from one of the most effective efforts to reduce nutrient pollution fouling the Chesapeake Bay. The state's cover crop program was one of six farm conservation projects in the six-state bay watershed to receive a total of $3.5 million from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service....
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 24, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Maryland is one of 13 Eastern states and regions, ranging from the Washington metropolitan area through Pennsylvania and New York to Maine, that will have to jointly coordinate air pollution controls if, as expected, the new Clean Air Act is passed by Congress this week and signed into law by President Bush.A little-publicized section of the legislation would establish for the first time a legal link between pollution in areas as far apart as New York City and Maryland's Garrett County, or Baltimore and Kennebunkport, Maine.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2011
A federal study assessing how much farmers are doing to clean up the Chesapeake Bay credits them with making progress in reducing their pollution but says the vast majority need to do more to help the troubled estuary. Conservation practices adopted by farmers in Maryland and the other five states draining into the bay have cut erosion by more than half and curtailed runoff of fertilizer by 40 percent, according to the study released Tuesday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2011
The state has grown "stronger" in the past year, Gov. Martin O'Malley told lawmakers Thursday — and he credited advances in public education and a focus on innovation with helping to spur economic recovery. In his fifth State of the State address, the Democratic governor echoed themes he sounded during last fall's re-election campaign and in his inaugural address last month. "The state of our state is stronger than it was two years ago, stronger than it was even a year ago," O'Malley said.
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