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NEWS
June 15, 2013
I feel the stormwater fee has failed to achieve its goal which is to reduce the pollution that makes it into the Chesapeake Bay ("Churches seek break on city stormwater fee," June 12). The current implementation of the stormwater fee unfairly fines those of us that are making investments in reducing pollution at the benefit of those that are not. For example, two people have identically sized lots. Person A has a lawn service dump fertilizer, pesticides and herbicides once a week on his lawn.
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NEWS
October 7, 2014
It is time to plug the loopholes for coal-fired power plants in Maryland ( "New coal plant pollution controls eyed," Sept. 13). A report by the Maryland Department of the Environment found that many of the coal fired power plants in Maryland had not used their pollution controls continuously. If the Brandon Shores and Wagner plants had used their controls continuously in 2012, they could have cut nitrous oxide emissions by 2,000 tons. So what's the problem with nitrous oxide?
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NEWS
June 24, 2012
While I agree that chemicals and manure are major problems contributing to Chesapeake Bay pollution, there are two additional concerns that should be addressed. One is the pollution associated with power mowers, leaf blowers and edgers. Most or these gasoline engines have little or no pollution controls. The second is the increasing population in the Chesapeake Bay watershed. During my lifetime, the population in Maryland has more than tripled, and homes and highways continue to reduce the efficiency of trees in cleansing the environment.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
A soil test recommended adding a lot of phosphorus to my new shrub bed this spring. The soil was very low in phosphorus, and I worked it in well before planting. Should I add more this fall? It's good that you thoroughly worked the phosphorus into the soil, because phosphorus is one of the big polluters of the Chesapeake Bay. It's important to prevent it from being washed into storm drains or waterways that lead to the bay. Phosphorus binds with soil and is not volatile like nitrogen, so the full application you already made should suffice for years to come.
NEWS
December 28, 2012
When our governor criticized state university law school students for backing the fight against pollution in the Chesapeake Bay, one knew the fix was in - even though the pollution at issue, according to U.S. District Court Judge William M. Nickerson, turned out to be not from some 80,000 chickens but from 42 cows put on the property as the proverbial red herring ("Farmers, Purdue win pollution suit," Dec. 21). The judge covered his tracks in an opinion that insults the common sense of all Marylanders.
NEWS
March 27, 2010
The House approved a bill Friday that would ease state requirements for some developers to keep pollution from washing off their building sites. The vote was 127-13. The measure now heads to the Senate. Developers and local officials have been pressing for some relief from new storm-water pollution regulations scheduled to take effect May 4, arguing that they could cost the state jobs and tax revenues and aggravate suburban sprawl. The bill would exempt some projects already in the works from having to meet the new, tougher requirements for controlling runoff, and it would give breaks to some redevelopment projects.
NEWS
February 24, 2010
What untold number of years will we have to wait for developers to take responsibility for their actions ("Md. lawmakers propose delaying, weakening storm-water pollution control," Feb. 18)? Del. Marvin E. Holmes Jr. says he agrees with the "objectives" of a restored Chesapeake Bay. Let's be clear what those objectives are: water Marylanders can enjoy safely, clean water where crabs, oysters, and rockfish can thrive, and a bay that doesn't turn into a partly-dead zombie every summer.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2014
State and federal officials joined a Chesapeake Bay nonprofit Thursday in announcing the award of more than $3.7 million to 34 organizations to reduce storm-water pollution in Maryland and three neighboring states and the District of Columbia. Nine of the grants totaling more than $1 million went toward planting trees, removing pavement and other greening projects in Baltimore city, while two smaller grants targeted plantings in Baltimore County. Shawn Garvin, Mid-Atlantic regional administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency, whose agency provided some of the funds, said investing in such "green infrastructure" to soak up rainfall is "critically important to restoring local waters and the Chesapeake Bay. " Storm-water runoff is a significant and growing source of pollution fouling the bay, but controlling it in dense, older communities is challenging and costly.
NEWS
March 7, 1991
State officials say Maryland needs tougher motor vehicle pollution standards than federal law requires in order to eliminate the smog that plagues the Baltimore and Washington areas every summer.The Evening Sun would like to know whether you favor tougher controls.To give your answer, call SUNDIAL at 783-1800 (or 268-7736 in Anne Arundel County). After you hear the greeting, you'll be asked to punch in a four-digit code on your Touch-Tone phone. The code is 4600. The results will be published tomorrow.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2012
A Baltimore coal terminal operator has agreed to pay a $34,600 penalty and settle pollution violations alleged by the Environmental Protection Agency. Federal regulators contend that CNX Marine Terminals at 3800 Newgate Ave. near the northern entrance to the Harbor Tunnel was piping storm-water runoff illegally from its coal storage yard into a creek that feeds into the Patapsco River. The company also was accused of not adequately safeguarding its underground fuel storage tanks from leaks, and of improperly storing used fluorescent lamps.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
To hear Larry Hogan tell it, the multibillion-dollar effort to clean up the Chesapeake Bay has been a dismal failure - and the biggest problem is getting Pennsylvania and New York to stop sending sediment pollution down the Susquehanna River. The Republican gubernatorial candidate vows to "stand up" for Maryland farmers, watermen and homeowners, who he contends have been unfairly burdened with the bay's restoration, and says he'd take the other states to court if necessary to get them to do more.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
The Maryland Department of the Environment recently revealed a draft rule that would finally require coal-powered plants in the Baltimore-Washington region to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions by 48 percent over the next four years ( "New coal plant pollution controls eyed," Sept. 13). Nitrogen oxides contribute heavily to the formation of ground-level ozone (smog) and seriously exacerbate cardiopulmonary health problems such as asthma. Smog is worse when air is still and hot, but 2014 has been relatively cool so there have been fewer "orange alerts" for dangerous air. But Maryland still has some of the worst air on the Eastern seaboard, due largely to coal.
FEATURES
By Tim Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2014
Ever wonder why your neighborhood streams and rivers look so muddy after a heavy rain? A recent survey of construction sites in the Baltimore area found less than a quarter of the exposed soil being worked had been properly protected from erosion. The survey, involving staff and volunteers from 22 different environmental and community groups, found widely varying but generally poor controls on mud pollution being used at building sites in Baltimore City and the five surrounding counties.
NEWS
Timothy B. Wheeler and The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2014
Looking to protect Marylanders from unsafe levels of smog, environmental regulators are moving to clamp down on pollution from the state's smaller coal-burning power plants, but plant owners warn that the rule could have economic consequences. The Maryland Department of the Environment recently unveiled a draft rule two years in the planning that would require coal-burning plants in the Baltimore and Washington areas to reduce emissions of nitrogen oxides by 48 percent over the next four years.
NEWS
September 1, 2014
The general election is still more than two months away but here's a bit of friendly advice to candidates hoping to win office in Maryland: Don't use the Conowingo Dam as an excuse to stop cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay. That would seem like common sense but it's become increasingly clear that damning the dam has become a popular political strategy. Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan released a 30-second ad through his website last month that essentially blames the Conowingo for the bay's woes and urges voters to fight back against other pollution-fighting strategies endorsed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Democratically-controlled state government.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
There weren't any keepers yet, but the fish were definitely biting for Willie Edwards one day last week as he trolled along the edge of the Susquehanna Flats. The 72-year-old fisherman from North East said he'd caught "a lot of little rock," or striped bass. The Flats - a vast, grass-covered shoal at the mouth of the Susquehanna River - are a magnet for fish and the anglers who pursue them. But they're also a symbol to scientists of the Chesapeake Bay's resilience, and of its ability to rebound, if given a chance, from decades of pollution and periodic battering by storms.
NEWS
March 29, 2013
In response to the recent article, "Bill would give farmers 10-year reprieve on new regs" (March 27) I wish to add more detail on why this bill, Senate Bill 1029, will be detrimental for Marylanders and the Chesapeake Bay. Agriculture is the single largest source of nutrient pollution in the Chesapeake Bay. That fact alone means that farms must be closely watched to ensure they are following state and federal regulations. The proposal contradicts this important idea by providing the possibility for farms to have a 10-year exemption from new pollution regulations.
NEWS
August 21, 2014
Saturday's Sun reported yet another episode of bay pollution by its most flagrant violator, the state of Maryland ( "Baltimore City reports massive sewage spills," Aug. 15). This time 3 million gallons of raw sewage reportedly were spilled overboard and ultimately into the bay. If The Sun would search its archives and provide the public a tally of all such spills over the last 10 years the real culprit of our bay's pollution would be exposed. Farmers' fertilizer leeching into the ground to enhance crop production and my commercial property, which garnered the state $6,000 in rain tax, most certainly contribute nothing detrimental to the bay compared to the state's record.
NEWS
By Marlene A. Condon | August 21, 2014
Some years ago, a colleague told me how, when he was a boy, he would vacation each summer with his parents in Ocean City . He and his mom always looked forward to crossing the Chesapeake Bay Bridge in Annapolis, where the sea breezes carried the very essence of this estuary - the smells associated with the vast array of organisms that live and die along the shoreline or in the saltwater. But by the 1980s, Rick noticed that the air surrounding the bridge no longer brought to mind visions of the beach with its myriad periwinkles, sea stars, crabs, shorebirds and seaweed.
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