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By Jason Kahn and Jason Kahn,Medical Tribune News Service | August 18, 1995
A little hair of the dog that bit you may be just what the doctor ordered for severe allergy sufferers. A new study shows that repeated doses of pollen delivered to the noses of people allergic to the substance dramatically reduced their hay fever symptoms.Allergy experts hope that the treatment, called nasal immunotherapy, can provide relief for the millions of allergic Americans who do not respond to medications.Immunotherapy is designed to de-sensitize allergy sufferers by giving them small, steadily increasing doses of an offending substance.
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By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2014
The winter was cold and snowy and the spring has been wet and warm, and that combination has made it easier for trees to produce much more pollen than normal. And that means runny noses and red, watery eyes for many who suffer from allergies. But Dr. Gregory Small, board-certified in internal medicine and a primary care physician at Greater Baltimore Medical Center at Texas Station, says that there are a number of ways to treat these allergies. What are the main spring allergens and symptoms?
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NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 12, 2008
Heather Johnson's symptoms kicked in after Tropical Storm Hanna's rains quit and she opened her windows to let in some fresh air. "By the next day, I'm all congested, I can't breathe," she said between coughs. But she wasn't sick. The raspy voice, the congestion, the severe sinus pain and all the rest of Johnson's complaints were allergy symptoms - likely the result of what specialists describe as an especially bad couple of weeks in this year's late-summer ragweed season. "We've been very busy," said Dr. Peter S. Creticos, clinical director of the Division of Allergy and Clinical Immunology at Johns Hopkins.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
As temperatures rise consistently into the 60s and 70s, spring blooms are bursting around the region -- elevating levels of tree and grass pollen. Tree pollen -- including cedar, maple, elm, poplar, beech, sycamore, willow and oak -- surged to high levels of concentration Friday, according to readings taken by allergists Drs. Golden & Matz LLC . The tree pollen count hit 620, a measure of the number of pollen spores per cubic meter. Grass pollen reached a count of 7 and weeds reached 16, both in the moderate range.
NEWS
By JOY PRESS and JOY PRESS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 25, 1996
"Pollen," by Jeff Noon. 336 pages. Crown Publishers. $23 As technology becomes more and more intrinsic to our everyday lives and computers insinuate themselves into our leisure time, writers like Jeff Noon will have a field day capitalizing on readers' expectations and fear of the future."Pollen," a sequel to Mr. Noon's award-winning debut, "Vurt," is a hip, fantastical blend of science fiction and pulp fiction. Both "Pollen" and "Vurt" are set in the dystopic future-world of Manchester, England - a city now populated by strange hybrid creatures such as dog-people, robot-dogs, and Zombies (the spawn of humans and corpses)
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | May 5, 1993
In springtime, Dana Frank's thoughts turn to baseball, steroid nasal sprays and antihistamine eye drops. He keeps his windows shut on many balmy nights, and powers up his car's air conditioning even when it isn't sticky outside.Like thousands of other Americans, the Baltimore physician suffers from a severe allergy to tree pollen. In late April and early May, when the oaks and ashes and alders get frisky, Dr. Frank feels miserable."Particularly in the early morning and late afternoon, I have very itchy eyes, painful eyes, sneezing, runny nose," he said yesterday.
NEWS
By Luther Young | September 24, 1990
Any day now, when the first hard frost puts the ragweed to sleep for another year, Frank Ward will pack up his microscope and call it quits.The man known as Mr. Pollen has risen before dawn for almost 30 years during the seven-month hay fever season to measure Baltimore's pollen counts, as faithful to his job as any dairy farmer.Now, at 65, a bit stiff in the joints and wearing his fourth set of bifocals, he may finally know the luxury of staying in bed in the morning and vacationing whenever he wants.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | May 13, 2005
Watch a bunchberry open its petals next month - if you can. Scientists who videotaped the explosive blooming of the little-known flower say it's the fastest motion ever recorded in a plant - action that will be on display in Maryland and much of the rest of the United States in the coming weeks. Cornus canadensis, as it's known scientifically, opens its petals in less than a thousandth of a second and shoots pollen into the air with the force of a rocket launcher. "It really is pretty cool," said Joan Edwards, a biologist at Williams College in Williamstown, Mass.
NEWS
By David Kohn and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | May 14, 2003
Every morning at 8, David Kerxton heads to the roof of an Owings Mills office building, collects two sticky glass tubes from a whirring contraption known as a rotorod and measures Baltimore's misery. Carefully washing the day's pollen from the glass, the respiratory therapist sits down at a microscope and laboriously counts each grain. One day a few weeks ago, he counted 10,000 of them. "When I see that, I usually just start to cry," Kerxton says. And so do thousands of others. In the wake of a bad winter and warm weather that arrived later than usual, doctors and researchers say this spring has been one of the most pollen-plagued in years.
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | May 6, 2007
Itchy, sneezy? If not, the yellow dust on your car proves that pollen counts are sky-high. Ann Pugh writes from Timonium, "Is there a time of day when the pollen count is the highest and the lowest? What weather conditions favor greater pollen and less pollen?" The allergy docs at Hopkins say most pollen levels climb in the afternoon, but some, like ragweed are highest just before sunrise. More pollen gets airborne in dry, windy weather. Rain cleanses the air briefly but promotes weed growth.
FEATURES
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
Honeybees responsible for pollinating crops worth billions of dollars are under attack from a cocktail of fungicides and pesticides that weaken colonies and make them susceptible to a deadly parasite, according to a study by the University of Maryland and federal agriculture researchers. The report, published in the online scientific journal PLOS ONE this week, said contaminated pollen from seven different test crops on the East Coast reduced the ability of healthy bees to fend off a parasite that causes them to starve to death.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2013
Marylanders will face a couple more days of gloomy weather before things brighten up again toward the end of the week, according to the National Weather Service. On the plus side, the stretch of drizzle and rain should wash away some of the masses of tree pollen that have afflicted allergy sufferers for the past few weeks, weather service meteorologist Greg Schoor said. Schoor said a high-pressure weather system near New England is responsible for the rain and high temperatures in the 60s. "If you can manage through today and tomorrow and even into Wednesday, Thursday and Friday will be a little improvement," Schoor said Monday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
Pollen counts surged to their highest levels of the season Thursday, and could stay there for the next week or two. Tree pollen reached 2,347 grains of pollen per cubic meter, almost twice as high as a spike in pollen a week earlier. Grass pollen has also reached "very high" levels, at a count of 163, and the weed pollen count is considered "high" at 65, according to Drs. Golden & Matz LLC . The count is taken at the allergy doctors' office in Owings Mills. The information is used in the National Allergy Bureau Pollen and Mold Report.  The Weather Channel meanwhile forecast "high" pollen levels for the Baltimore area on Thursday.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2013
Tree pollen levels surged to "very high" levels in the Baltimore area Thursday and Friday, though rain and thunderstorms could bring a respite Friday evening. The allergens reached a saturation of 1,481 grains per cubic meter of air Thursday and 1,112 grains per cubic meter of air Friday, according to Drs. Golden and Matz LLC, a local chain of allergy treatment centers. The practice supplies allergen information to the National Allergy Bureau Pollen and Mold Report, measured from its Owings Mills office.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 11, 2013
Allergy sufferers, beware: It's just about that time of year to get a stock of tissues handy again. Trees have started to bud, and as temperatures rose and sunshine abounded this weekend, pollen levels have crept up.  Tree pollen levels are considered high Monday in the Baltimore area, according to the National Allergy Bureau Pollen and Mold Report . Levels had been low since late February. According to The Weather Channel , the most prevalent varieties of tree pollen are cedar, maple and elm. Mold levels are meanwhile also at low levels and have been since late February, according to the allergy bureau.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | March 8, 2012
The Sun's weather page in print and online don't show it quite yet, but spring allergy season has begun. Moderate mold levels have been reported for the past week. Low levels of cedar, maple and elm tree pollen are present and beginning to creep up. Tree pollen typically peaks in mid-April and lasts through early August. Grass pollen doesn't begin until late May. The fact that many flowering trees are already blooming around the region is probably not a good sign for allergy sufferers.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN REPORTER | October 1, 2007
In this season of sniffles, sneezes and itchy eyes, researchers are hoping that wind and weather patterns they recorded in a vacant, weed-choked field in Prince George's County will provide clues to fighting an airborne particle that sickens millions every year. It's called ragweed. And while its effects are well-known, scientists say there is still much to learn about how the hardy, ubiquitous plant spreads its misery. "We know ragweed produces pollen, but one of the things we want to understand is where and how does that pollen travel," said Lewis Ziska, a ragweed expert at the U.S. Department of Agriculture's research laboratory in Beltsville.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
For most people, the microscopic particles that seep into our bodies this time every year are harmless. But for 35 million of us, the pollen that permeates the air turns into a natural poison in our nostrils and lungs, triggering the immune system in ways that send us to doctors and drug stores for relief. "Pollen is a pollutant that gets into the air. We think of pollutants as man-made, but this is a naturally occurring pollutant," said Dr. Richard Lockey, an allergy specialist at the University of South Florida College of Medicine.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2011
An overgrown graveyard downtown, where some of Baltimore's early historical figures rest in walled isolation, buzzes now with new life. Just inside the locked gate of Old St. Paul's Cemetery on Martin Luther King Boulevard, honeybees zip in and out of a white hive perched on cinder blocks. They flit past weathered headstones for a signer of the Declaration of Independence, the hero of the 1814 defense of Fort McHenry, a Civil War general and other long-gone luminaries. The hive, put there by staff and students at the University of Maryland, Baltimore, is one of the latest — and certainly one of the more unusual — installments in the growing pastime of backyard beekeeping.
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