Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPoll Tax
IN THE NEWS

Poll Tax

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | March 22, 1991
LONDON -- Britain's unpopular poll tax will be replaced by a new property charge, the government announced yesterday.The widespread revolt against the poll, or head, tax contributed to the ouster of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher last fall and posed a serious threat to the re-election chances of Prime Minister John Major's government.The poll tax, which imposed a flat levy on all voters, rich and poor alike, was designed to help fund local government spending. Critics said it placed an unfair burden on low-income people while giving relief to wealthy property holders.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Chris Dufresne | September 16, 2010
Jerry Lee Lewis wrote the bumper song for this week's poll: "Whole lot of shake-up going on. " Or maybe it should have been "Hello, Dolley" with James Madison, fresh off its upset over Virginia Tech, checking in at No. 25. South Carolina, up 10 spots to No.14, suddenly looks like the team Alabama should fear most. Mike Stoops wants to know why Arizona isn't on the leaderboard, which won't be an issue Saturday if his Wildcats upset Iowa. (Ranking last week) 1. Boise State 1-0 (1)
Advertisement
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | March 20, 1991
LONDON -- In what the opposition called the "biggest climb-down in modern political history," the British government retreated yesterday from the unpopular poll tax and announced a major switch from local to central funding of services.The move shifted the cost of $8 billion worth of services previously financed by local communities to the central government. This will lower the average cost of the local poll, or head, tax by $250 per person.To enable the central government to cover the tab, Chancellor of the Exchequer Norman Lamont announced an increase in the value-added tax (VAT)
NEWS
May 5, 2008
ID rule protects integrity of vote Unlike the writer of the editorial criticizing the Supreme Court for upholding Indiana's voter identification law ("A voting setback," April 30), I believe the court's decision was correct. We need a photo ID for driving, traveling, banking, buying pharmaceuticals, etc. I believe most people, even among the elderly and the poor, already have one to do one or more of these daily tasks. Voting is a right and it should be taken seriously, with a little regulation to ensure the legitimacy of our votes.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | March 11, 1991
LONDON -- A desperate search is under way for a new way of financing local government after a dramatic voter revolt last week against the unpopular poll, or head, tax.The tax, introduced by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher last year, levies a flat per capita payment on all voters -- with a few exemptions -- whatever their financial status.Technically, the pauper and the millionaire living in the same jurisdiction pay identical amounts, as set by their local council.The tax last week brought the Conservative Party government ** one of its most humiliating election defeats in 11 years in power.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | November 30, 1990
LONDON -- Prime Minister John Major confronted Labor opposition leader Neil Kinnock for the first time across the aisle of the House of Commons yesterday in the debut of the new political trial of strength now engaged here.Margaret Thatcher MP, reduced overnight to the back benches of the House of Commons, watched from an aisle seat on the fourth row from which she delivered her maiden parliamentary speech 30 years ago, as the two men who will contest the next general election squared off.Opinion polls showed that overnight the Conservatives under Mr. Major had stolen an 11 percentage-point lead over Labor under Mr. Kinnock, dramatically reversing the popularity advantage the opposition had held for the past year.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | August 16, 1991
GLASGOW, Scotland -- John Mullin wears the gloomy look of a man desperate to find the bright side of a dark situation.He sits behind the gray stone walls of Strathclyde House in the center of Glasgow and wonders how he's going to deal with the consequences of the tax revolt outside.It's happening all across Britain. But in Scotland it is more bitter because it is fueled by nationalistic sentiment.Until recently, it had the open support of the Scottish National Party, which claims 20 percent of Scotland's voters.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | April 24, 1991
LONDON -- The government of Prime Minister John Major unveiled its replacement yesterday for the unpopular poll, or head, tax. The new method of funding local government will be a property-and-people charge based on the value of the home and the number of people living in it.The new tax would be lower than either the poll tax or the earlier property tax, according to projections by the Conservative Party.Environmental Secretary Michael Heseltine said it would be fair because those in the most expensive property would pay twice as much as those in the cheapest of seven "value bands."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | March 24, 1991
LONDON -- Prime Minister John Major laid out his Conservative agenda for the 1990s yesterday, promising a mixture of old and new policies but giving no clue as to when he will call the next general election.His confidence and clarity won him a standing ovation from the Conservative Party faithful at the end of a week of confusion over abandonment of the unpopular poll tax, the flagship of Margaret Thatcher's last term as prime minister.Mr. Major defended the decision to replace the poll tax with a combination property-and-people levy.
NEWS
By EARL OFARI HUTCHINSON | July 20, 2006
NAACP officials did not uncork the champagne after the House voted to reauthorize the landmark 1965 Voting Rights Act. And there's good reason why: The law is not out of the legislative woods yet. The Senate still has to reauthorize it, and there's a core of doubting, wavering and even hostile senators that could waylay reauthorization. Their gripe is the same as that of House Republicans who stalled the legislation for more than a week. They say it punishes the South for past voting-discrimination sins, and they don't like the idea of bilingual ballots.
NEWS
By EARL OFARI HUTCHINSON | July 20, 2006
NAACP officials did not uncork the champagne after the House voted to reauthorize the landmark 1965 Voting Rights Act. And there's good reason why: The law is not out of the legislative woods yet. The Senate still has to reauthorize it, and there's a core of doubting, wavering and even hostile senators that could waylay reauthorization. Their gripe is the same as that of House Republicans who stalled the legislation for more than a week. They say it punishes the South for past voting-discrimination sins, and they don't like the idea of bilingual ballots.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2005
With the approaching 40th anniversary of the landmark Voting Rights Act, civil rights activists are urging Congress to reauthorize provisions of the law set to expire in two years and mobilizing to clear up misconceptions - including a rampant e-mail hoax warning that blacks are about to lose their right to vote when the act expires in 2007. The rumor, of course, is false. The 15th Amendment guarantees protection against discrimination in voting. But the 1965 law includes several additional provisions designed to prevent discrimination, which will expire unless Congress moves to reauthorize them within the next two years.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | August 16, 1991
GLASGOW, Scotland -- John Mullin wears the gloomy look of a man desperate to find the bright side of a dark situation.He sits behind the gray stone walls of Strathclyde House in the center of Glasgow and wonders how he's going to deal with the consequences of the tax revolt outside.It's happening all across Britain. But in Scotland it is more bitter because it is fueled by nationalistic sentiment.Until recently, it had the open support of the Scottish National Party, which claims 20 percent of Scotland's voters.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | April 24, 1991
LONDON -- The government of Prime Minister John Major unveiled its replacement yesterday for the unpopular poll, or head, tax. The new method of funding local government will be a property-and-people charge based on the value of the home and the number of people living in it.The new tax would be lower than either the poll tax or the earlier property tax, according to projections by the Conservative Party.Environmental Secretary Michael Heseltine said it would be fair because those in the most expensive property would pay twice as much as those in the cheapest of seven "value bands."
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | March 24, 1991
LONDON -- Prime Minister John Major laid out his Conservative agenda for the 1990s yesterday, promising a mixture of old and new policies but giving no clue as to when he will call the next general election.His confidence and clarity won him a standing ovation from the Conservative Party faithful at the end of a week of confusion over abandonment of the unpopular poll tax, the flagship of Margaret Thatcher's last term as prime minister.Mr. Major defended the decision to replace the poll tax with a combination property-and-people levy.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | March 22, 1991
LONDON -- Britain's unpopular poll tax will be replaced by a new property charge, the government announced yesterday.The widespread revolt against the poll, or head, tax contributed to the ouster of Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher last fall and posed a serious threat to the re-election chances of Prime Minister John Major's government.The poll tax, which imposed a flat levy on all voters, rich and poor alike, was designed to help fund local government spending. Critics said it placed an unfair burden on low-income people while giving relief to wealthy property holders.
NEWS
May 5, 2008
ID rule protects integrity of vote Unlike the writer of the editorial criticizing the Supreme Court for upholding Indiana's voter identification law ("A voting setback," April 30), I believe the court's decision was correct. We need a photo ID for driving, traveling, banking, buying pharmaceuticals, etc. I believe most people, even among the elderly and the poor, already have one to do one or more of these daily tasks. Voting is a right and it should be taken seriously, with a little regulation to ensure the legitimacy of our votes.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2005
With the approaching 40th anniversary of the landmark Voting Rights Act, civil rights activists are urging Congress to reauthorize provisions of the law set to expire in two years and mobilizing to clear up misconceptions - including a rampant e-mail hoax warning that blacks are about to lose their right to vote when the act expires in 2007. The rumor, of course, is false. The 15th Amendment guarantees protection against discrimination in voting. But the 1965 law includes several additional provisions designed to prevent discrimination, which will expire unless Congress moves to reauthorize them within the next two years.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | March 20, 1991
LONDON -- In what the opposition called the "biggest climb-down in modern political history," the British government retreated yesterday from the unpopular poll tax and announced a major switch from local to central funding of services.The move shifted the cost of $8 billion worth of services previously financed by local communities to the central government. This will lower the average cost of the local poll, or head, tax by $250 per person.To enable the central government to cover the tab, Chancellor of the Exchequer Norman Lamont announced an increase in the value-added tax (VAT)
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | March 11, 1991
LONDON -- A desperate search is under way for a new way of financing local government after a dramatic voter revolt last week against the unpopular poll, or head, tax.The tax, introduced by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher last year, levies a flat per capita payment on all voters -- with a few exemptions -- whatever their financial status.Technically, the pauper and the millionaire living in the same jurisdiction pay identical amounts, as set by their local council.The tax last week brought the Conservative Party government ** one of its most humiliating election defeats in 11 years in power.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.