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By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | January 15, 1992
Mike Royko is on vacation. During his absence, we are reprinting some of his favorite columns. This column first ran in 1981.HARDLY A DAY PASSES without a new book being published on exercise and physical fitness. Authors of these books, male and female and debatable, turn up on the TV shows to flex themselves and demonstrate methods for staying young, fit, and boring.But despite the national craze for daily strenuous exercise, many people still refuse to take part.You mention jogging, the most popular form of exercise, and they say: "I hate running."
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2012
Blame it on Lawrence Welk. If you're unfamiliar with that name, members of the American Accordionists' Association will give you an extra-warm welcome to their festival in Baltimore this week. Accordionists in this country have long struggled with the legacy of Welk, the bandleader known for "champagne music" and polkas. His TV show, which aired from the mid-1950s to the early '80s, and then for what seemed an eternity in reruns on PBS, always gave a prominent role to the accordion.
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NEWS
August 2, 2007
Andrew Felix Rekus, a retired Baltimore Gas and Electric chemist, died of a heart attack July 26 at his son's Odenton home. The former Homeland resident was 88. Born in Baltimore and raised on Hollins Street, he was a 1937 Loyola High School graduate who earned a chemistry degree at Loyola College. He worked at Revere Copper and Brass in Southwest Baltimore before serving in the Army Air Forces during World War II. He did research in ordnance at the Dwight Patterson Air Force Base in Dayton, Ohio, and received a commendation for his work.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | May 11, 2011
Part of the trouble of the many sites offering discount coupons for restaurants, spas and entertainment venues is the initial investment. With Restaurant.com, Groupon, LivingSocial and others, you've got to pay upfront for the voucher, then remember to redeem it by the expiration date, or any savings is lost. But this Consumer Website of the Week , the recently launched Citycents.com , offers its coupons for free, avoiding any of the regret that you might experience over getting caught up in the thrill and romance of a limited time offer or overestimating your desire for sandkayaking or cardio polka lessons.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | February 17, 1995
Carl Szuba has been dancing the polka for 24 years, and this weekend he's doing it again.About 700 people from the East Coast are expected to gather at La Fontaine Bleu Sunday for the 25th Annual Polka Party, sponsored by God's Special Children, a group that raises money for mentally retarded and developmentally disabled people.The group hopes to collect $10,000 for the Anne Arundel County Association for Retarded Citizens' Respite Care Home in Linthicum. Mr. Szuba, 67, said he has talked to County Councilman James E. DeGrange about getting the county to match the group's donation.
FEATURES
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Ocean City Bureau of The Sun | September 17, 1994
Ocean City -- They've been doing the polka for three days and the dance floor is never empty at Polkamotion by the Ocean. At first glance, the Convention Center upper room is a sea of bobbing heads in a roar of accordions and a thumping backbeat.Watch for a while, and the dancers and the dance sort themselves out. Polka comes in a lot of flavors: the Chicago style, a smooth, waltzy step; the old-fashioned kind, a slow glide; and the one prevalent on this dance floor -- the Eastern style, a faster motion with a lot of hop in it.Midway through the festival, which ends tomorrow, everyone is having a good time, no matter which polka is preferred.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | June 3, 1996
Theresa Carr loved everything about Baltimore's annual Polish Festival -- the food, the atmosphere, the music, the chance to sit on a spit of grass in Patterson Park on a perfect Sunday afternoon, play with her son and talk to her best friend while tapping out a polka."
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | February 17, 1992
ALBERTVILLE, France -- They brought out the peasant dresses and vests, the lederhosen and schmaltz. They came from China and North Korea, Italy and Great Britain. They came from everywhere, it seemed, except Poland.This was Polka Night at the Winter Olympics.Last night, Marina Klimova and Sergei Ponomarenko of the Unified Team moved one step closer to claiming the gold medal in the ice dance competition by winning the original dance to the polka.Isabelle and Paul Duchesnay of France, third after the compulsories, moved into second.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | February 24, 1992
ALBERTVILLE, France -- It started with a ballet of bungee jumpers and ended with a polka.There was a former superpower in search of a name, a unified country in search of an identity, and a divided country in search of peace.The United States was just looking for a man, any man, to win a medal.The 16th Winter Olympics, which ended last night under cloudless skies in this crossroads town of the French Alps, were more than just a 16-day television show.It was political and athletic theater played out on ice and snow.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | December 27, 2008
Attention polka nuts, boot slappers, schnitzel nibblers and lager quaffers: Blob's is about to reopen - at least for a little while. Blob's Park, the Jessup beer hall that closed last year after serving German food and beer with a side of lively dancing for more than seven decades, will reopen on New Year's Eve. "Everyone can't wait till it's open so we can have a reunion," says Mary Kotowski, a professional polka dancer who married her husband on...
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2011
Louis August Scholz, a self-employed patent attorney and inventor who had worked in photography on the Manhattan Project during World War II, died April 20 of complications from a fall at his Sykesville home. He was 92 and died at the University of Maryland Medical Center. Born in Baltimore and raised in Rockdale near Randallstown, he was a 1935 Catonsville High School graduate and earned a degree in mathematics and physics at what is now Loyola University Maryland. As a young man, he exhibited an invention, a fluorometer, at the Central Enoch Pratt Free Library . Mr. Scholz worked at the Social Security Administration and the old Monitor Controller Co. on South Gay Street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kayla Cross, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2010
Get your fill of the polka at this weekend's 37th annual Polish Festival. The event, which kicks off a summer of ethnic festivals, takes place at the Pulaski Monument at Patterson Park Friday through Sunday. The festival encompasses several aspects of Polish heritage including music, food and dance. Authentic Polish music, including polka, will be played throughout the festival on one of the three stages, as well as dancing from the P.K.M. Polish Folk Dance Group of Philadelphia on Saturday and the Krakowianka dancers from Baltimore on Sunday.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and Janene Holzberg,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 27, 2009
Exactly one year after a New Year's Eve party resurrected a beloved beer hall that had seemingly been left for dead, revelers are primed to polka at Blob's Park once again. But this Thursday's celebration at the popular Jessup venue won't be tinged by the drama or sorrow of years past. Tears won't be flowing as they were in 2007, when guests thought they were watching the 1,000-seat Bavarian beer garden take its last breath after nearly 75 years. And the liquor license won't need signing a mere nine hours before the doors open, as was the case in 2008, said owner Max Eggerl.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,julie.scharper@baltsun.com | December 27, 2008
Attention polka nuts, boot slappers, schnitzel nibblers and lager quaffers: Blob's is about to reopen - at least for a little while. Blob's Park, the Jessup beer hall that closed last year after serving German food and beer with a side of lively dancing for more than seven decades, will reopen on New Year's Eve. "Everyone can't wait till it's open so we can have a reunion," says Mary Kotowski, a professional polka dancer who married her husband on...
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | October 2, 2008
Andrew C. Dorn, a retired Sunpapers employee who worked in the newspaper's transportation department for nearly four decades, died of kidney failure Sept. 22 at his Dundalk home. He was 89. Mr. Dorn was born and raised in East Baltimore and attended city public schools. During World War II, he worked as a riveter at the old Glenn L. Martin Co. plant in Middle River, building warplanes. A chance encounter in 1944 with a Sunpapers employee led Mr. Dorn to apply for a job driving a newspaper delivery truck, family members said.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Julie Scharper,Sun reporter | October 20, 2007
Sometime soon, the last schnitzel will be fried, the last malty marzen will be poured, and the accordion will grow silent. Blob's Park, a German-style beer garden that opened on a Jessup farm more than 70 years ago, will close within the coming year, according to manager John Eggerl, making this year's Oktoberfest celebration the last. The cavernous Bavarian-style building, where generations have gathered to hoist a few beers or whirl to rousing polka music, will be demolished to make way for a new development.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,special to the Sun | March 2, 2007
Kim Kutchins could not take her eyes off her son. She was listening to music and noticed Jack, 6, dancing along. "I thought, `You would be really good at either Irish step dance ... or the polka,'" said Kutchins, of Ellicott City. Now 8, Jack is a two-year veteran of the Polka Kids, a children's dance troupe. Although Jack participates in several sports, polka is his favorite activity. "It's a dying art," said Kutchins. "A lot of people don't even know what it is, and it's a really fun activity."
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | October 17, 2005
It's a Friday night in October and the revelers sit at long tables in a Bavarian biergarten. The bratwurst is ample, the beer pitchers overflowing and the polka music is almost nonstop. German culture is all around. Germany, however, is an ocean away. This is Blob's Park, a Teutonic outpost in Jessup that for more than three-quarters of a century has offered a little piece of Germany tucked away on a Maryland farm. And at the heart of it all is the polka. "The people ... come here to dance," says Leon Umberger, hardworking accordion player for the house band, the Rheinlanders, wiping sweat off his forehead on a recent night.
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