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By Sylvia Badger | December 15, 1995
SAVANNAH, the newest eatery to open in the Admiral Fell Inn in Fells Point, had its grand opening recently. Among the more than 700 people who stopped by for a look and a taste included lots of politicos, ranging from former Gov. William Donald Schaefer to city councilman Tony Ambridge.I am told that politicians seemed to be drawn to places where Savannah chef-proprietor Cindy Wolf and director-proprietor Tony Foreman work. They met, courted and were married while working at Georgia Brown's in D.C., a local hot spot for politicos.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
This segment of Chuck Todd's "The Daily Rundown" Monday got more media bounce than usual for the show thanks to MSNBC commentator Michael Steele sounding very serious about running for governor in Maryland. But to me, it was first and foremost the perfect tableau of the troubled channel as TV boneyard for unemployed politicos. This video featuring Steele and put-out-to-pasture Obama spokesman Robert Gibbs illustrates not only the reason MSNBC is dying in the ratings, but also the deeper disease of our democracy with cable channels handing over airtime to talking heads who are committed to ideology and partisan political gain, not information, analysis or civic enlightenment.
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FEATURES
February 27, 1991
March 8: Experience the musical talents of Baltimore Count politicos while helping financially support the local families of Gulf troops by attending a dance held at Essex VFW Post 2621, 206 Riverside Road, from 8 p.m. to midnight. "The Baltimore County Band" includes County Executive Roger Hayden on trumpet and state Sen. Norman Stone on alto sax. Admission is $12 per person, including hot food, live music, beer, and soda. For more information, call 682-6186.Send listings of events related to the Persian Gulf war to Gulf Events, Features Dept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2012
Outside of CNN's performance on the night of Iowa caucuses, no one's election-related TV coverage excited me as much as that provided by Politico last week on Super Tuesday. I heard and saw it on C-SPAN radio and TV. Politico had been streaming such coverage, but Super Tuesday was the first time it was carried nationally by C-SPAN. The good news, Politico will be back on C-SPAN tonight with Campaign 2012 coverage starting at 7 p.m. Politico's HD livestream coverage starts at 6:30.
NEWS
March 26, 2010
What's wrong with this picture? An organization that really does something gets a 16.6 percent reduction in pay, gets to go without any pay raises, and it's pay in 2012-2013, will be the same as it was in 2001 ("BSO salaries hit sour note once again," March 26). Beside this picture is the Maryland political landscape, from the governor down to the county councilmen. How is their pay doing? How many freezes, reductions, etc., have they seen? Oh, yes, I forgot about the delegates who make as much as the symphony members for a part time job, during which they accomplish nothing to justify this largess!
FEATURES
March 7, 1991
*Tomorrow:The "Baltimore County Band" -- starring County Executive Roger B. Hayden and other politicos -- makes its debut at a dance to raise funds for the families of U.S. troops. 8 p.m. to midnight. Essex VFW Post 2621, 206 Riverside Road. $12 includes food and drink. Call 687-8041.*March 18-27: "The Storm and After: War and Peace in the Middle East," sponsored by Villa Julie College. Lectures on the region featuring diplomats, military leaders and others. Free and open to the public. Below are several sessions; call 486-7000 for more information.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts | December 3, 2003
Ed Oliver, 58, was glad to see the state's top politicos fly to Michigan Monday, where they lobbied General Motors executives to keep their Baltimore plant open. Because of declining sales of its main product, the Chevrolet Astro van, GM may close the Broening Highway facility, a move that would cost 1,100 jobs. Oliver started on the assembly line after returning from Vietnam, survived more labor strife than he cares to remember and, now, 37 years later, leads weekly discussions on safety and quality.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | July 20, 2000
CRISFIELD - Pete Evans heard a few tidbits of political gossip yesterday, a lot of them about congressional redistricting possibilities the Salisbury Democrat hopes will make life miserable for a certain Republican congressman from the Eastern Shore. Rainy weather kept the governor in Annapolis, but Evans greeted a few candidates, including Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan, who's flirting with a gubernatorial bid. Across the way, Republican hopeful Paul H. Rappaport, who aims to unseat Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, worked the crowd as volunteers handed out campaign stickers for him and Republican presidential candidate George W. Bush.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | October 26, 1994
G-O-T-V.Get Out The Vote.With less than two weeks to go in what polls show is a close race for governor, both Democrats and Republicans have tattooed these four letters on the backs of their hands.After all the rhetoric and television ads, the fund-raisers and rallies, getting voters to the polls -- and, of course, getting them to vote the right way -- will be the No. 1 factor in determining the outcome Nov. 8.But some of Baltimore's politicos -- both bosslets and muldoons, those usually happy, loyal camp followers -- are beginning to grouse over the efforts to turn out city voters for Parris N. Glendening.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 13, 2006
From the cover Queen Latifah takes a `Holiday' Queen Latifah ratchets down her typically outsized persona to great effect in Last Holiday, an endearing fish-out-of-water comedy that's best when its tone matches its star's performance. Unfortunately, director Wayne Wang (The Joy Luck Club, Because of Winn-Dixie) displays a tendency to slip into slapstick mode. When he does, my best advice is: Go for the popcorn. By the time you come back, Last Holiday will be back on track, Latifah will be back on the screen, and all will be well with the cinematic world.
NEWS
March 26, 2010
What's wrong with this picture? An organization that really does something gets a 16.6 percent reduction in pay, gets to go without any pay raises, and it's pay in 2012-2013, will be the same as it was in 2001 ("BSO salaries hit sour note once again," March 26). Beside this picture is the Maryland political landscape, from the governor down to the county councilmen. How is their pay doing? How many freezes, reductions, etc., have they seen? Oh, yes, I forgot about the delegates who make as much as the symphony members for a part time job, during which they accomplish nothing to justify this largess!
FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | June 20, 2007
YOU CAN fool all the people all the time if the advertising budget is big enough," says Ed Rollins. Mr. Rollins happened by Michael's cafe this week where I was lunching with speechwriter-columnist Peggy Noonan. We greeted the genial Ed, who had worked for Ronald Reagan and other Republicans, including Christine Todd Whitman and the unelectable Michael Huffington. Rollins became famous at the end of the latter's campaign, saying: "In three decades as a political junkie, I never worked a more miserable, depressing, or rotten race than the 1994 Huffington Senate campaign.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 13, 2006
From the cover Queen Latifah takes a `Holiday' Queen Latifah ratchets down her typically outsized persona to great effect in Last Holiday, an endearing fish-out-of-water comedy that's best when its tone matches its star's performance. Unfortunately, director Wayne Wang (The Joy Luck Club, Because of Winn-Dixie) displays a tendency to slip into slapstick mode. When he does, my best advice is: Go for the popcorn. By the time you come back, Last Holiday will be back on track, Latifah will be back on the screen, and all will be well with the cinematic world.
NEWS
By G. Jefferson Price III | December 5, 2004
ONCE UPON A time in Annapolis, The Sun was a mighty force, and the newspaper's chief representative in the state capital was a mighty force, too, possibly more influential than any other single individual, even the governor at one time or another. The Sun's man in Annapolis was Charles G. Whiteford. He reigned in the 1950s, 1960s and early 1970s. Charlie's sheer size was enough to get your attention. He was way over 6 feet tall and walked with a head-first lope. And what a head it was - flat with a broken nose set off by a couple of dolorous eyes rolling over the rest that hung like the face of a bloodhound in repose.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 16, 2004
WASHINGTON -- Political pollsters and consultants, as type-cast by Hollywood, are often fat, cigar-smoking smart alecks who would sell their grandmothers to get their candidates elected. For that reason, Robert Teeter, the premier Republican pollster who in 1992 oversaw the senior President George H.W. Bush's re-election campaign, never would have made it past a screen test. Mr. Teeter's death Sunday at 65 after a long struggle with cancer deprives the political battleground not only of one of its most trustworthy operatives but also one of its most gentle warriors.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 20, 2004
Just as our weather heats up, Baltimore has a new place to be cool -- in a manner of speaking. Mosaic, a covered outdoor lounge, opens tonight at Power Plant Live! The Cordish Co. V.P. Reed Cordish says the concept is that of a sophisticated hotspot -- along the lines of the Shore Club or the Delano in Miami's South Beach or the Sky Bar in Los Angeles. You'll find Mosaic at the front entrance to Power Plant Live! under a large stretched-canvas roof. Underneath, there are groupings of couches and ottomans -- real furniture where you can loll as cocktail servers take your orders from Mosaic's extensive martini list and a whole passel of champagnes and wines by the glass.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith M. Redding and Judith M. Redding,Special to the Sun | March 7, 2004
In Rebecca Pawel's strongly atmospheric Law of Return (Soho Press, 274 pages, $24), Guardia Civil Carlos Tejada finds himself marking time in Franco's Spain until an important parolee goes missing, presumed murdered. Tejada, investigating the missing Manuel Arroyo Diaz and his wealthy and influential in-laws, may ruin the plans of another parolee, Guillermo Fernandez, to smuggle a colleague and Jewish German classics scholar across the French border and onto a ship to Mexico. Because Tejada had met Fernandez's daughter Elena while at his previous posting in Madrid, he feels duty-bound to help her family.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 20, 2004
Just as our weather heats up, Baltimore has a new place to be cool -- in a manner of speaking. Mosaic, a covered outdoor lounge, opens tonight at Power Plant Live! The Cordish Co. V.P. Reed Cordish says the concept is that of a sophisticated hotspot -- along the lines of the Shore Club or the Delano in Miami's South Beach or the Sky Bar in Los Angeles. You'll find Mosaic at the front entrance to Power Plant Live! under a large stretched-canvas roof. Underneath, there are groupings of couches and ottomans -- real furniture where you can loll as cocktail servers take your orders from Mosaic's extensive martini list and a whole passel of champagnes and wines by the glass.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Judith M. Redding and Judith M. Redding,Special to the Sun | March 7, 2004
In Rebecca Pawel's strongly atmospheric Law of Return (Soho Press, 274 pages, $24), Guardia Civil Carlos Tejada finds himself marking time in Franco's Spain until an important parolee goes missing, presumed murdered. Tejada, investigating the missing Manuel Arroyo Diaz and his wealthy and influential in-laws, may ruin the plans of another parolee, Guillermo Fernandez, to smuggle a colleague and Jewish German classics scholar across the French border and onto a ship to Mexico. Because Tejada had met Fernandez's daughter Elena while at his previous posting in Madrid, he feels duty-bound to help her family.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts | December 3, 2003
Ed Oliver, 58, was glad to see the state's top politicos fly to Michigan Monday, where they lobbied General Motors executives to keep their Baltimore plant open. Because of declining sales of its main product, the Chevrolet Astro van, GM may close the Broening Highway facility, a move that would cost 1,100 jobs. Oliver started on the assembly line after returning from Vietnam, survived more labor strife than he cares to remember and, now, 37 years later, leads weekly discussions on safety and quality.
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