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By Marian Burros and Marian Burros,New York Times News Service | October 27, 1991
WEST REDDING, Conn. -- Some of us would rather forget the recipes of the 1950s and '60s that we embraced with such enthusiasm.We blush at what we thought passed for "gourmet," like roast duck with gala soda pop glaze, a recipe that called for a bottle of 7-Up, and noodle doodle and cheese made with canned macaroni and cheese, frozen broccoli and a can of French fried onions.Not Jane and Michael Stern, who treat meatloaf Wellington and Grand Marnier souffle as equals.With the publication this month of their 17th book, "American Gourmet" (HarperCollins)
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By Jonah Goldberg | December 23, 2013
So rednecks need to be politically correct now? Wait, before the National Association of Rednecked Persons attacks me, let me be clear that I don't mean "redneck" as an insult. Indeed, Redneck Pride has been on the rise ever since Jeff Foxworthy got rich informing people they "might be a redneck. " (Some clues: if your school fight song was "Dueling Banjos;" if you've ever raked leaves in your kitchen; if your boat hasn't left your driveway for 15 years; if birds are attracted to your beard, etc.)
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NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | July 16, 1999
YOU WOULD think that a man who saved three people's lives, at considerable risk to his own, would be recognized as a hero. But his story is politically incorrect, so it has received virtually no media attention and his name remains unknown.It all started when a gunman, Richard Gable Stevens, 21, who intended to kill himself and others, took three hostages at a Santa Clara, Calif., gun club with a semiautomatic rifle that he had rented there. His plan was thwarted when an employee of the shooting range shot him twice with a handgun, freeing the hostages.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jaclyn Peiser, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2012
On New Year's Eve 2008 - when all of the popular kids were out partying - Max Temkin and his pack of social outcasts were hunkered in his parents' basement. With nothing better to do, they grabbed a stack of cardboard paper and some scissors and created Cards Against Humanity, a politically incorrect card game in the vein of Apples to Apples. After winter break, Temkin returned to Goucher and introduced the game to his friends. It was an instant hit - other students kept asking him how they could get a copy.
FEATURES
By Don Aucoin and Don Aucoin,BOSTON GLOBE | March 29, 1998
You've got to respect Bill Maher's willingness to blast through the pious cant that passes for political discourse in Hollywood, though the host of "Politically Incorrect" fails at that as often as he succeeds.To judge by a profile of him in the April US magazine, Maher is an easier guy to respect than to like. He comes across as smart but prickly, talented but tough on the people who work for him (he goes through writers "at a record clip," according to author Chris Mundy).Maher is candid about his desperate need to succeed, fueled by his fear of being left behind by the comedians with whom he launched his career, such as Jerry Seinfeld and Paul Reiser.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 5, 1997
Dribs and drabs from the notebook, just the thing to kick off 1997.A few changes to note in the world of local TV programming:WMAR, Channel 2, will not be carrying ABC's new late-night entry, "Politically Incorrect" (Boo!), which debuts tomorrow. Instead, "Access Hollywood" will air at 12: 05 a.m., after "Nightline," with "Extra!" coming on at 12: 35 a.m. Beginning next Monday, Pat Bullard's talk show will round out the evening, airing at 1: 05 a.m.In the mornings beginning next Monday, Maury Povich's show will air at 9 a.m., followed by "In Person with Maureen O'Boyle" at 10.And finally, beginning tomorrow, "Wheel of Fortune" and "Jeopardy!"
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 29, 1998
All the hullabaloo about President Clinton's libido is translating into some impressive numbers for ABC's late-night programming."Nightline," which was born in response to a political crisis (hostage-taking in Iran) and always attracts more viewers on big-news days, is holding true to form. Based on figures from the country's top 50 television markets (overall ratings for last week weren't available until this morning), Ted Koppel and his gang are attracting 40 percent more viewers since allegations surfaced that the president had sexual relations with former White House intern Monica Lewinsky.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 9, 2003
The very first image viewers of the new NBC sitcom Whoopi will see tonight is that of Mavis Rae (Whoopi Goldberg) lighting a cigarette and taking a drag as she stands behind the front desk of the small Manhattan Hotel she owns. A guest standing nearby picks up a no-smoking sign and says, "Excuse me." "Oh, you're right, sir. I'm sorry. Here, I'll just put it out," she says meekly, moving her hand toward an ash tray. But as soon as the guest turns his back and starts to walk away, she puts the cigarette back in her mouth.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1997
For a comedian who thrives on skewering politicians from both sides of the ideological spectrum, visiting Washington is either a chance to tap a treasure trove of material or an opportunity for your enemies to rip you to shreds.For Bill Maher, host of ABC's "Politically Incorrect," it's decidedly the former with just a dash of the latter mixed in."I always have a good time there," says Maher, whose show began a four-night stint at Washington's Ford's Theater on Tuesday. "I feel like they're the ones who don't like me. I take that as a badge of honor."
NEWS
November 8, 1993
Movie official says that violence is outThe entertainment industry "is ready to assume its responsibility" and has already taken steps to reduce violence on television and in films, Motion Picture Association of America President Jack Valenti said yesterday."
NEWS
By Meghan Daum | December 27, 2011
As fans of the late Christopher Hitchens cycle through the five stages of grief, it's interesting to see which of his opinions can still inspire the kind of anger that is unlikely to ever fade into acceptance. There are, of course, the obvious candidates: his characterization of Bill Clinton as "a rapist" or his vilification of Mother Teresa as "a fanatic, a fundamentalist, and a fraud. " There is also his oh-so-chivalrous shout-out to the Dixie Chicks, whom he called "fat slugs" (or "slags" or "sluts" depending on your source)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2010
If you've only seen Bill Maher on HBO's "Real Time with Bill Maher" or ABC's "Politically Incorrect," you haven't really seen Bill Maher. In concert he is, paradoxically, more relaxed and intense. Freed from the five-minute monologue and the host's chair, he moves with a flexible prowl. He plays with and off his fans, without pandering to them. He fearlessly reacts to whatever is happening in the moment. Three years after he filled the Lyric, Maher brings his stage act to the Hippodrome at 8 p.m. tonight.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | July 3, 2008
The words "domestic violence" typically invite images of bruised women and children - and male perpetrators. But the real picture of domestic violence isn't so clear-cut. And the solution to family violence is far more complex than our current criminal justice approach can handle. For about 30 years now, we've been throwing money and punishment at domestic violence with not enough to show for it. Estimates are that more than 32 million Americans are affected by domestic violence each year, with many of those in need of help never reporting their abuse.
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | November 26, 2006
Listening to Marc Steiner on the phone is just like listening to him on radio. In a fast-paced, scratchy baritone, he talks about a wide range of topics from his love of the city to his love of reading -- he even confesses a love of large trucks. The Baltimore native, 60, hosts a daily talk show on WYPR-FM that's among the station's most popular. On this day, he's just finished interviewing E.L. Doctorow and preparing to attend a reception for the author, where Steiner will be the host -- of course.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | September 15, 2006
WASHINGTON -- A lot of people have their shorts bunched in a knot over a decision by the CBS reality game show Survivor: Cook Islands to divide its competing "tribes" by race and ethnicity. No surprise there. We have enough wars to worry about these days without having one put forth as prime-time entertainment, even if it's all in good fun. Hispanics Across America founder Fernando Mateo called the Survivor move an "offensive and cheap trick" to boost ratings, which is undoubtedly true, but hardly the first time networks have done that.
NEWS
August 26, 2006
Confront the threat from radical Islam It's amazing that the liberal Democratic talking points about how President Bush's policies have created more terrorists and fomented hatred toward the United States seem to be gaining currency ("Bush frames touchy topics as winners for Republicans," Aug. 22). Of course, this spurious point of view conveniently omits the fact that the single most devastating attack against us in our history was plotted and planned well before the Bush administration ever existed.
FEATURES
September 13, 1993
Calling all card-carrying members of the politically incorrect. We want to talk to you.You're tired of politicians, actors, athletes, rock stars and the media telling you what to think, wear, eat and drive. Something inside of you has snapped, and an inner voice says "No, I won't do what I'm told."It's also saying:This is my life and it's my business.I drive a gas-guzzling car.I eat red meat.I smoke cigarettes -- in public!I wear fur.I have a Confederate flag.I won't recycle.I buy the National Enquirer and watch "A Current Affair," thank you very much.
NEWS
By Tom Siebert | October 18, 2001
POLITICALLY INCORRECT needs to go to the television graveyard. Not because it's politically incorrect, but because it's politically irrelevant. ABC's late-night talk forum and its embattled host, Bill Maher, have been savaged for his comments on the program six days after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon. Mr. Maher said he disagreed with people who called the terrorists "cowards." "Not true," he said. "We're the cowards. Lobbing cruise missiles from 2,000 miles away, that's cowardly.
NEWS
By Diane Cameron | August 31, 2005
THIS IS A big week for the shopping mall. Whether we're sending a kid back to school or just responding to our own internal clock, fall shopping is now. We'll complain about prices and we'll commiserate about what kids insist they "have to have," but the odds are good that adults will also want a new shirt or sweater this time of year. The pull to shop is powerful. It's that feeling that's built into us from years of preparing for school, but there is also a strong push that comes from advertising.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | February 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - Is it possible that I'm beginning to feel sorry for Lawrence Summers? Do I need an intervention? No, it isn't his opponents who have dredged up my soupcon of sympathy for the president of Harvard University. It's his defenders. The Story That Will Not Die began when Mr. Summers offered his opinion on women and science. Deliberately provoking a conference audience, he suggested that part of the reason women hadn't achieved equality in academic science was "intrinsic aptitude."
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