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NEWS
May 5, 1993
A remarkable aspect of the Soviet Union's dissolution has been the generally bloodless and non-violent way in which the centralized government and the tightly controlled one-party system have been replaced by a fledgling democracy. Granted, there has been serious mayhem and bloodshed in Moldova, Armenia and Azerbaijan. But never before has a great empire become unglued as fast as in the former Soviet Union -- or as peacefully.This is worth noting because Russia, too, has its potential for violence.
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NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | May 17, 2011
Earlier this year, in the wake of the near-fatal shooting of Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, I wrote two columns about violent rhetoric and actions in America. At the time, the convenient narrative in the mainstream media was that violent talk emanated equally from both sides of the political spectrum. I argued that such false equivalencies masked a more violent strain of language from conservative elites and more frequent use of violence by conservative activists. I challenged readers to cite chapter and verse of liberal transgressions of equal quantity or magnitude.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 24, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- A high-level official of South Africa's new multiracial political party, the United Democratic Movement, was riddled with bullets yesterday as he left a grocery store near his home in a rural area about an hour's drive north of Durban.With the campaign for South Africa's second national elections just gearing up, the killing of the official, Sifiso Nkabinde, again raises questions about whether political violence will return as the vote approaches.Nkabinde was expelled by President Nelson Mandela's African National Congress party for allegedly spying on the party for the former apartheid government.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 17, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- The United Nations reported that at least 34,000 Iraqi civilians died last year in continuing violence between Sunni Arab insurgents and Shiite militants, - underscored by a series of bombings yesterday that left at least 72 college students dead in the capital. The coordinated blasts on a Shiite-dominated university campus came on an already grueling day of sectarian and political violence in the capital that left at least 64 more Iraqis dead. The U.N. figure, nearly triple the number recently released by the Iraqi Health Ministry, jibes with estimates that about 100 people a day have perished in political violence since the bombing of a revered Shiite shrine in February.
NEWS
May 20, 2000
IF ONLY the Western Hemisphere's poorest country weren't also arguably its most violent. Haiti's dubious status, however, continues -- with the depth of its political dysfunction plumbed once again as scheduled elections approach. The latest wave of violence began in early April with the murder of Jean Leopold Dominique, the internationally respected director of Radio Haiti. Mr. Dominique was equally hated by the left and right and had received numerous recent death threats, his family said.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 25, 1999
RICHMOND, South Africa -- The weekend assassination of a political warlord here and the immediate apparent reprisal killings of 11 others underlined a question that loomed even before the shootings: Can this year's elections be held without more widespread bloodshed?In the first democratic elections in 1994, this volatile province of KwaZulu-Natal was ravaged by political violence between black parties. The cycle of killings here has never stopped, and now there are suspicions that white zealots are trying to intensify the situation as a first step toward destabilizing the province, and perhaps the nation.
NEWS
By Newsday | November 27, 1993
UNITED NATIONS -- The United Nations said yesterday that "highly placed members" of the Haitian army were involved in the killing Sept. 11 of Antoine Izmery, a wealthy merchant and supporter of exiled President Jean-Bertrand Aristide.In a 17-page report, the United Nations also said the killing of Mr. Izmery marked a new stage in Haiti's political violence and sent a message that "no one was untouchable" in the campaign to keep Father Aristide from returning to power."This symbolic dimension has shown itself to be effective, because no public demonstration of support for the president of the republic [Father Aristide]
NEWS
February 9, 2001
IF ONLY HAITI had a history of constitutional democracy like that of the United States. Were that the case, Wednesday's inauguration of Jean-Bertrand Aristide would have been a cause for celebration - in the small island nation and abroad. Instead, it was marked by a new round of uncertainties, prompted by the abrupt end of talks between Mr. Aristide's party and the 15-party opposition alliance that claimed earlier legislative elections were fraudulent and has named its own provisional president.
NEWS
By Borzou Daragahi and Borzou Daragahi,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 17, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- The United Nations reported that at least 34,000 Iraqi civilians died last year in continuing violence between Sunni Arab insurgents and Shiite militants, - underscored by a series of bombings yesterday that left at least 72 college students dead in the capital. The coordinated blasts on a Shiite-dominated university campus came on an already grueling day of sectarian and political violence in the capital that left at least 64 more Iraqis dead. The U.N. figure, nearly triple the number recently released by the Iraqi Health Ministry, jibes with estimates that about 100 people a day have perished in political violence since the bombing of a revered Shiite shrine in February.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 28, 1995
WASHINGTON -- As President Clinton seeks public and congressional support for sending U.S. troops into Bosnia, a military mission that administration officials point to as a model -- Haiti -- is starting to unravel.A year after 20,000 U.S. troops staged a bloodless invasion to reinstall President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the impoverished Caribbean nation is experiencing renewed political violence, a surge of refugees and a slowdown of its economic reforms. Some observers fear increased violence if United Nations peacekeepers withdraw on schedule in February.
NEWS
By Roberta Cohen and Michael O'Hanlon | June 14, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Afghanistan's military situation today is better than could have been predicted eight months ago. The Taliban are gone from power; al-Qaida is on the run and appears confined primarily to the southeast border near Pakistan; the new interim government of Hamid Karzai remains in control in Kabul; more than a million refugees are returning from abroad; and fears of large-scale fighting between competing warlords have not yet become fact....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and By Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2001
In the Northern Ireland town of Omagh, a group of citizens gathered around a small garden Friday to memorialize the victims of Tuesday's devastating attacks in the United States. Michael Gallagher stepped forward and placed on the soil an American flag that had hung in his son Adrian's room since 1991. The garden itself was created to commemorate another tragedy, a 1998 car bombing not far from this spot that had killed 29 people and injured hundreds more. One of the dead was 21-year-old Adrian, who had driven into the bustling shopping district that Saturday to buy a pair of jeans and boots.
NEWS
February 9, 2001
IF ONLY HAITI had a history of constitutional democracy like that of the United States. Were that the case, Wednesday's inauguration of Jean-Bertrand Aristide would have been a cause for celebration - in the small island nation and abroad. Instead, it was marked by a new round of uncertainties, prompted by the abrupt end of talks between Mr. Aristide's party and the 15-party opposition alliance that claimed earlier legislative elections were fraudulent and has named its own provisional president.
NEWS
By David M. Anderson | December 22, 2000
WASHINGTON -- What happened in America from Nov. 7 to Dec. 12 could have happened only in America. We never will agree as a nation whether what happened was fair. But in the months ahead, we would do well as a nation to reach some consensus on how what happened reflected core elements of who we are. The point of view that says what happened was a reflection of the strength of the American political system is simplistic. It subsumes a seriously defective system for casting, counting and recounting votes -- in Florida and many other states -- under the banner of the world's greatest democracy.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 23, 2000
HARARE, Zimbabwe - After a campaign defined by death, violence and economic turmoil, Zimbabwean voters will go to the polls this weekend in an election that may lead to the first change in government in two decades - or, some fear, may push their country further into chaos. Zimbabweans will be choosing new parliamentary leaders. But the election is viewed not so much as a contest between individual candidates as a battle between President Robert Mugabe's ailing, yet firmly entrenched, one-party government and a powerful new opposition group giving the government its first serious challenge.
NEWS
May 20, 2000
IF ONLY the Western Hemisphere's poorest country weren't also arguably its most violent. Haiti's dubious status, however, continues -- with the depth of its political dysfunction plumbed once again as scheduled elections approach. The latest wave of violence began in early April with the murder of Jean Leopold Dominique, the internationally respected director of Radio Haiti. Mr. Dominique was equally hated by the left and right and had received numerous recent death threats, his family said.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 5, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A year after Rwanda's explosion of genocide, central Africa remains roiled by ethnic hatred, desperate economies and the plight of more than 2 million refugees.Now, rising political violence in Burundi raises the question: Can the genocide happen again?U.S. and United Nations officials, for their part, play down the prospect of a bloodbath in Burundi. "It's not going to happen," insists Gordon Duguid, spokesman for the U.S. Embassy in Bujumbura, the Burundian capital.But human rights groups are more pessimistic.
NEWS
By Roberta Cohen and Michael O'Hanlon | June 14, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Afghanistan's military situation today is better than could have been predicted eight months ago. The Taliban are gone from power; al-Qaida is on the run and appears confined primarily to the southeast border near Pakistan; the new interim government of Hamid Karzai remains in control in Kabul; more than a million refugees are returning from abroad; and fears of large-scale fighting between competing warlords have not yet become fact....
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 25, 1999
RICHMOND, South Africa -- The weekend assassination of a political warlord here and the immediate apparent reprisal killings of 11 others underlined a question that loomed even before the shootings: Can this year's elections be held without more widespread bloodshed?In the first democratic elections in 1994, this volatile province of KwaZulu-Natal was ravaged by political violence between black parties. The cycle of killings here has never stopped, and now there are suspicions that white zealots are trying to intensify the situation as a first step toward destabilizing the province, and perhaps the nation.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 24, 1999
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- A high-level official of South Africa's new multiracial political party, the United Democratic Movement, was riddled with bullets yesterday as he left a grocery store near his home in a rural area about an hour's drive north of Durban.With the campaign for South Africa's second national elections just gearing up, the killing of the official, Sifiso Nkabinde, again raises questions about whether political violence will return as the vote approaches.Nkabinde was expelled by President Nelson Mandela's African National Congress party for allegedly spying on the party for the former apartheid government.
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