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By Diana Jean Schemo and Diana Jean Schemo,Sun Staff Correspondent | October 29, 1990
ROME -- Eleven of the European Community's 12 leaders yesterday pledged to surrender control over national monetary policy in January 1994 and to match steps toward monetary unity with the creation of a European political union.Ending two days of meetings here, all European Community leaders except British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher agreed to set Jan. 1, 1994, as the date to begin the second phase of a plan to use a single currency by the end of the century.Yesterday's timetable appeared to be the most far-reaching ste toward the creation of Europe as a supranational body since the 1957 Treaty of Rome envisaged a single market of goods and people.
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NEWS
November 11, 2012
Of all the pundits and politicians from whom we've heard during the past 24 months, letter writer Alan Walden came the closest to articulating a reasonable explanation for voting Republican in the 2012 election ("A stranger in his own land," Nov. 9). As an enthusiastic supporter of President Barack Obama, I nonetheless share many of Mr. Walden's concerns about giving to the undeserving and a retaining a healthy distrust of centralized power. I suspect that he and I would be friends were we to meet over dinner.
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NEWS
September 5, 1992
The unthinkable in western Europe has become thinkable. Even three months ago, when Danes voted to reject the Maastricht treaty to strengthen the European Community, few thought the setback to monetary and political union was more than temporary. The Irish vote ratifying the treaty two weeks later reinforced that view. But the Danish vote prompted French President Francois Mitterrand to call a referendum of his own for later this month, confident it would resoundingly support the strengthened community.
NEWS
By Thomas P. M. Barnett | January 3, 2005
IN HIS CLASSIC description of globalization The Lexus and the Olive Tree, columnist Thomas L. Friedman quotes an Egyptian professor asking, "Does globalization mean we all have to become Americans?" This simple question contains the current great myth of globalization, within which we can locate much of the world's anxiety regarding America's global war on terrorism. In short, the world's current anti-Americanism is based on the notion that globalization is an American plot to enslave the planet in an economic and military empire of unprecedented historical scope, with the war being nothing more than propaganda to hide our true intentions.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | November 11, 1991
Paris -- In the Netherlands next month the European heads of government are supposed to consider political union. A draft treaty will be before them. It will serve to demonstrate how remote European political unification really is. Political unification, that is, as the leaders of the European Community have chosen to define unity.They say they mean a true federal government with a common foreign and defense policy. They seem obsessed by the American precedent: that they are doing the same thing the delegates of the American colonies were doing at the Philadelphia Constitutional Convention in 1787.
NEWS
December 9, 1991
South of Netherlands proper on the map is an appendage, surrounded by Belgium on the west and Germany on the east, closer to France and Luxembourg than to Amsterdam. The chief town is Maastricht. It would be hard to find a more "European" place.Today and tomorrow, the heads of the 12 governments in the European Community will meet in Maastricht to iron out the sticking points after year-long negotiations at lower levels on two agreements: one, for a future European monetary union (or Emu, which is also a fat bird that does not fly)
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 16, 1990
ROME -- The European Community formally started yesterday the process of turning its 12 member nations into a more unified political federation with common foreign and security policies and a single currency.At the same time, community leaders told Iraq once again that it TC must withdraw from Kuwait, affirmed a massive program of emergency aid for the Soviet Union and eased their economic sanctions against South Africa.Baghdad, they warned, bears responsibility for ensuring peace in the Persian Gulf.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 11, 1991
MAASTRICHT, Netherlands -- The European superstate was born here late last night, the child of a dozen fathers with varying enthusiasm for it and differing expectations for its future.The leaders of the 12 European Community countries agreed to treaties that would amend the EC's basic document, the Treaty of Rome, and set Europe irrevocably on the road to monetary union with a single currency by the end of the century.The treaties also ordained a deeper political union for the 12 by assuring that they would act increasingly under the guidance of single foreign and defense policies.
NEWS
November 11, 2012
Of all the pundits and politicians from whom we've heard during the past 24 months, letter writer Alan Walden came the closest to articulating a reasonable explanation for voting Republican in the 2012 election ("A stranger in his own land," Nov. 9). As an enthusiastic supporter of President Barack Obama, I nonetheless share many of Mr. Walden's concerns about giving to the undeserving and a retaining a healthy distrust of centralized power. I suspect that he and I would be friends were we to meet over dinner.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 9, 1991
BRUSSELS -- Western Europe's political leaders will meet today and tomorrow to try to forge their diverse nations into a unified continent that could ultimately rival the United States in diplomatic as well as economic might.A "United States of Europe," if one is to develop at all, remains years or probably decades away. The immediate goals are more modest: to cement Western Europe's economic union, which began in earnest in the mid-1980s, and to support it with "political union" -- a mechanism for developing common policies in such areas as foreign relations and even defense.
NEWS
By DANA H. ALLIN and PHILLIP H. GORDON | May 2, 1993
The Belgians, the Italians and especially the British won't like it. But rescuing Europe from its current malaise probably depends on France and Germany once more getting their act together and presenting their EC partners with a fait accompli.The European Community faces savagery on its Balkan porch, potential chaos from Algiers to Moscow, and a more civil but still ominous disarray in its own ranks. Europe needs a smaller core of decisive and truly unified nations to put out whatever fires are extinguishable and to contain those that aren't.
NEWS
September 5, 1992
The unthinkable in western Europe has become thinkable. Even three months ago, when Danes voted to reject the Maastricht treaty to strengthen the European Community, few thought the setback to monetary and political union was more than temporary. The Irish vote ratifying the treaty two weeks later reinforced that view. But the Danish vote prompted French President Francois Mitterrand to call a referendum of his own for later this month, confident it would resoundingly support the strengthened community.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | March 23, 1992
LONDON -- It is time for second thoughts in Europe, about Europe. The drive toward federalism has slowed.Much of the impetus given to the integration process by the treaty signed at the European Community's summit in December in Maastricht, Holland, has diminished."
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 11, 1991
MAASTRICHT, Netherlands -- The European superstate was born here late last night, the child of a dozen fathers with varying enthusiasm for it and differing expectations for its future.The leaders of the 12 European Community countries agreed to treaties that would amend the EC's basic document, the Treaty of Rome, and set Europe irrevocably on the road to monetary union with a single currency by the end of the century.The treaties also ordained a deeper political union for the 12 by assuring that they would act increasingly under the guidance of single foreign and defense policies.
NEWS
December 9, 1991
South of Netherlands proper on the map is an appendage, surrounded by Belgium on the west and Germany on the east, closer to France and Luxembourg than to Amsterdam. The chief town is Maastricht. It would be hard to find a more "European" place.Today and tomorrow, the heads of the 12 governments in the European Community will meet in Maastricht to iron out the sticking points after year-long negotiations at lower levels on two agreements: one, for a future European monetary union (or Emu, which is also a fat bird that does not fly)
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 9, 1991
BRUSSELS -- Western Europe's political leaders will meet today and tomorrow to try to forge their diverse nations into a unified continent that could ultimately rival the United States in diplomatic as well as economic might.A "United States of Europe," if one is to develop at all, remains years or probably decades away. The immediate goals are more modest: to cement Western Europe's economic union, which began in earnest in the mid-1980s, and to support it with "political union" -- a mechanism for developing common policies in such areas as foreign relations and even defense.
NEWS
By DANA H. ALLIN and PHILLIP H. GORDON | May 2, 1993
The Belgians, the Italians and especially the British won't like it. But rescuing Europe from its current malaise probably depends on France and Germany once more getting their act together and presenting their EC partners with a fait accompli.The European Community faces savagery on its Balkan porch, potential chaos from Algiers to Moscow, and a more civil but still ominous disarray in its own ranks. Europe needs a smaller core of decisive and truly unified nations to put out whatever fires are extinguishable and to contain those that aren't.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau | March 23, 1992
LONDON -- It is time for second thoughts in Europe, about Europe. The drive toward federalism has slowed.Much of the impetus given to the integration process by the treaty signed at the European Community's summit in December in Maastricht, Holland, has diminished."
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | November 11, 1991
Paris -- In the Netherlands next month the European heads of government are supposed to consider political union. A draft treaty will be before them. It will serve to demonstrate how remote European political unification really is. Political unification, that is, as the leaders of the European Community have chosen to define unity.They say they mean a true federal government with a common foreign and defense policy. They seem obsessed by the American precedent: that they are doing the same thing the delegates of the American colonies were doing at the Philadelphia Constitutional Convention in 1787.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 16, 1990
ROME -- The European Community formally started yesterday the process of turning its 12 member nations into a more unified political federation with common foreign and security policies and a single currency.At the same time, community leaders told Iraq once again that it TC must withdraw from Kuwait, affirmed a massive program of emergency aid for the Soviet Union and eased their economic sanctions against South Africa.Baghdad, they warned, bears responsibility for ensuring peace in the Persian Gulf.
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