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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
"House of Cards," a political thriller starring Kevin Spacey and directed by David Fincher, will be filmed in Baltimore starting this spring, it was confirmed Thursday by Gov. Martin O'Malley. The production, which involves 13 one-hour episodes for television, comes from Media Rights Capital and  Netflix and is expected to launch the company known primarily for DVD distribution as a major creator of original dramatic programming. Netflix, which has more than 20 million subscribers, outbid such traditional producers of quality TV drama as HBO and AMC for the rights.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, assistant editor, b | April 23, 2013
The folks at "House of Cards" sure love the Baltimore area. Not only is the majority of the political thriller filmed in and around the city (and, full disclosure, in The Baltimore Sun newsroom), now the show's head honcho, Beau Willimon, is slated to come to Towson University on Wednesday (April 24) to discuss how he developed the addictive series. According to a Towson University press release, Willimon will speak at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday in Van Bokkelen Hall, Room 204. The event is free and open to the public.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2010
The return of "Mad Men" last week already makes AMC the place to go Sunday nights for the finest drama on television this summer. Tonight comes a second reason to choose this cable channel, with the two-hour debut of "Rubicon," a richly textured conspiracy thriller created by three-time Peabody Award-winner Henry Bromell, a writer well-known to Baltimore audiences from the years when he lived and worked here as an executive producer of "Homicide: Life...
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
"House of Cards," the Netflix series starring Kevin Spacey, will be filmed in part in the Calvert Street offices of the Baltimore Sun, it was confirmed Friday. “We are pleased that we were able to accommodate the production needs for this series," said Steve Seidl, senior vice president of operations and technology for The Baltimore Sun Media Group. "It is always exciting when our city is chosen as a film location, and we are looking forward to being a part of the project. " The production contract with the Baltimore Sun runs through the summer.  Soundstages are also being built in Harford County for a 26-episode order on the American remake of a critically acclaimed political thriller done by the BBC in 1990.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 21, 1994
Yeats, an Irishman himself, said it best: "The worst are full of passionate intensity." So it was in 1974 when the worst of the Irish -- IRA terrorists -- detonated a bomb in a British pub killing five people. And so it was that the worst of the English -- the Security Services -- reacted savagely with laws suppressing individual rights, which permitted them to sweep up in a sloppy but vast net virtually anyone with a brogue.One such was a flaky youth named Gerry Conlon, then 20, a Belfast refugee who was quickly browbeaten into confession and spent the next 15 years in dismal British prisons.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1998
Imagine a world in which terrorists are compassionate; secret-police torturers are conflicted; and hostages display the understanding and forgiveness of saints.That is the fuzzy-headed mix concocted by Brazilian director Bruno Barreto in his political thriller "Four Days in September," nominated for a foreign-film Oscar.The movie is set in 1969, when thousands took to the streets to protest Brazil's repressive government. But Barreto, director of the sensuous Brazilian hit "Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands," isn't interested in taking sides in this ideological struggle.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, assistant editor, b | April 23, 2013
The folks at "House of Cards" sure love the Baltimore area. Not only is the majority of the political thriller filmed in and around the city (and, full disclosure, in The Baltimore Sun newsroom), now the show's head honcho, Beau Willimon, is slated to come to Towson University on Wednesday (April 24) to discuss how he developed the addictive series. According to a Towson University press release, Willimon will speak at 12:30 p.m. Wednesday in Van Bokkelen Hall, Room 204. The event is free and open to the public.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 16, 2012
"House of Cards," the Netflix series starring Kevin Spacey, will be filmed in part in the Calvert Street offices of the Baltimore Sun, it was confirmed Friday. “We are pleased that we were able to accommodate the production needs for this series," said Steve Seidl, senior vice president of operations and technology for The Baltimore Sun Media Group. "It is always exciting when our city is chosen as a film location, and we are looking forward to being a part of the project. " The production contract with the Baltimore Sun runs through the summer.  Soundstages are also being built in Harford County for a 26-episode order on the American remake of a critically acclaimed political thriller done by the BBC in 1990.
EXPLORE
October 8, 2011
now playing "50/50" (R). In this comedy, Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Seth Rogen are best friends whose lives are changed by a cancer diagnosis that set them on a series of personal adventures. TownMall Cinemas (1:50, 4:20, 7:45, 10:15) "Courageous" (PG-13). Four friends and police officers are devoted to their jobs and public service, but find tougher tasks at home in fatherhood and other duties. TownMall Cinemas (1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00) "Dolphin Tale" (PG)
FEATURES
By Robert Ward and Robert Ward,Los Angeles Times | April 18, 1994
When I was asked to review this novel I was wary, because I doubted that the book itself could live up to the fantastic hype surrounding it.If the name Allan Folsom doesn't ring a bell, his story probably will. About a year and half ago, there were a lot of items in every paper about Mr. Folsom, a failed screenwriter who had toiled in Hollywood for years and years with only a couple of episodes of some long-forgotten TV show to his credit.After 10 years of what must have been backbreaking work, he sent his big, ambitious thriller to a literary agent, Aaron Priest in New York.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
"House of Cards," a political thriller starring Kevin Spacey and directed by David Fincher, will be filmed in Baltimore starting this spring, it was confirmed Thursday by Gov. Martin O'Malley. The production, which involves 13 one-hour episodes for television, comes from Media Rights Capital and  Netflix and is expected to launch the company known primarily for DVD distribution as a major creator of original dramatic programming. Netflix, which has more than 20 million subscribers, outbid such traditional producers of quality TV drama as HBO and AMC for the rights.
EXPLORE
October 8, 2011
now playing "50/50" (R). In this comedy, Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Seth Rogen are best friends whose lives are changed by a cancer diagnosis that set them on a series of personal adventures. TownMall Cinemas (1:50, 4:20, 7:45, 10:15) "Courageous" (PG-13). Four friends and police officers are devoted to their jobs and public service, but find tougher tasks at home in fatherhood and other duties. TownMall Cinemas (1:00, 4:00, 7:00, 10:00) "Dolphin Tale" (PG)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2010
The return of "Mad Men" last week already makes AMC the place to go Sunday nights for the finest drama on television this summer. Tonight comes a second reason to choose this cable channel, with the two-hour debut of "Rubicon," a richly textured conspiracy thriller created by three-time Peabody Award-winner Henry Bromell, a writer well-known to Baltimore audiences from the years when he lived and worked here as an executive producer of "Homicide: Life...
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | April 17, 2009
Nothing is as it seems in State of Play, a crackerjack political thriller in which no individual, profession or institution gets away clean. Director Kevin Macdonald (The Last King of Scotland) has said he prefers flawed heroes, and in State of Play, he presents audiences with a passel of them. Veteran journalist Cal McAffrey (Russell Crowe) insists he's all about the truth, but regularly bends the rules he insists that he abides by. Crusading Congressman Stephen Collins (Ben Affleck) cheats on his wife even while ridiculing other people's moral compasses.
NEWS
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | November 5, 2006
An unfamiliar car pulls up to a house at night. There's a knock at the door. Innocent events in most circumstances, but in Death and the Maiden they can be hair-raising. DEATH AND THE MAIDEN / / Through Nov. 26 at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St. -- $10-$60 -- 410-332-0033 or centerstage.org
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 9, 2005
Named after a think-tank term for a reconstituted Middle East, Syriana is an exercise in futility posing as a modernistic thriller. Writer-director Stephen Gaghan jams a diverse group of players inside a jagged-edged, radical-chic plot. George Clooney is an out-of-favor CIA agent, Matt Damon an international-finance whiz grieving for his son, and Jeffrey Wright a Washington lawyer ordered by his boss (Christopher Plummer) to vet an oil merger - but also to make sure he paints a good face on it. Along with a subplot about impoverished Muslim oil workers recruited for suicide bombing, these characters and their storylines merge into a picture of a political-industrial complex on the brink of self-destruction.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | March 18, 1992
They're just like any other first-time authors: anxious to see how their new book is received, thrilled at the prospect of people picking up their Washington mystery and reading it. "It's amazing to see people on airplanes carrying our book," one of them says in the hotel room, and there is wonder in her voice.Typical rookie writers, Marilyn Quayle and her sister Nancy Northcott are -- except for those two grim-looking Secret Service agents with walkie-talkies who are standing in the hall.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | April 17, 2009
Nothing is as it seems in State of Play, a crackerjack political thriller in which no individual, profession or institution gets away clean. Director Kevin Macdonald (The Last King of Scotland) has said he prefers flawed heroes, and in State of Play, he presents audiences with a passel of them. Veteran journalist Cal McAffrey (Russell Crowe) insists he's all about the truth, but regularly bends the rules he insists that he abides by. Crusading Congressman Stephen Collins (Ben Affleck) cheats on his wife even while ridiculing other people's moral compasses.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1998
Imagine a world in which terrorists are compassionate; secret-police torturers are conflicted; and hostages display the understanding and forgiveness of saints.That is the fuzzy-headed mix concocted by Brazilian director Bruno Barreto in his political thriller "Four Days in September," nominated for a foreign-film Oscar.The movie is set in 1969, when thousands took to the streets to protest Brazil's repressive government. But Barreto, director of the sensuous Brazilian hit "Dona Flor and Her Two Husbands," isn't interested in taking sides in this ideological struggle.
FEATURES
By Robert Ward and Robert Ward,Los Angeles Times | April 18, 1994
When I was asked to review this novel I was wary, because I doubted that the book itself could live up to the fantastic hype surrounding it.If the name Allan Folsom doesn't ring a bell, his story probably will. About a year and half ago, there were a lot of items in every paper about Mr. Folsom, a failed screenwriter who had toiled in Hollywood for years and years with only a couple of episodes of some long-forgotten TV show to his credit.After 10 years of what must have been backbreaking work, he sent his big, ambitious thriller to a literary agent, Aaron Priest in New York.
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