Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPolitical Spectrum
IN THE NEWS

Political Spectrum

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Pete King | April 6, 1997
WHO IS THE most powerful liberal in American politics? He has prevented the Republican majority in Congress from addressing affirmative action and race-based quotas. He has forced congressional Republicans to shelve their drive to defund the National Endowment for the Arts. He has stood firm against tax cuts.He is a confidant of Jesse Jackson's. He is a pal to Alec Baldwin. He is a cheerleader for bipartisan cooperation at any cost and a pious opponent of the unspeakable horrors of harsh partisan rhetoric.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | September 5, 2008
Barack Obama. Hillary Clinton. John McCain. George W. Bush. Ted Stevens. If you can't find some humor in that bunch ... man, you ain't tryin'. And rest assured, the men and women of DeFace the Nation, Second City's all-political revue, will be tryin' with everything they've got when they appear at Towson University's Stephens Hall Theatre. For decades, the satirists and absurdists of second City have been taking aim at the entire range of the political spectrum, leaving no ideology unchallenged, no sacred cow unscathed.
Advertisement
NEWS
By JEFF COHEN | March 30, 1997
THE PUNDITOCRACY in our country has been so one-sided for so long that we hardly notice the routine tilt anymore. It seems like the dandelions in spring, to be the natural order of things.Sometimes, however, a political moment of unusual clarity reveals the profound imbalance that's been there all along.Tune in to TV pundit programs or radio talk shows or read an op-ed page these days and you'll behold vociferous attacks echoing against conservative Republican leaders. But the verbal onslaught isn't coming from the left; it's coming from the voices who've reigned loudest for years in media commentary - the hordes of right-wing pundits.
NEWS
By Austin Gisriel | July 25, 2008
It is time to stop talking about the "political spectrum" in this country, and instead talk about the "political circle." If I head to the left or right on a spectrum, I will continue to travel further from my starting point. On a circle, however, if I start to my right and go far enough, I will end up to the left of where I started. This is the best imagery I can use to explain that I am so conservative on some issues that I become a liberal. Take for example, the supposedly conservative idea that there should be a constitutional amendment defining marriage.
NEWS
By Austin Gisriel | July 25, 2008
It is time to stop talking about the "political spectrum" in this country, and instead talk about the "political circle." If I head to the left or right on a spectrum, I will continue to travel further from my starting point. On a circle, however, if I start to my right and go far enough, I will end up to the left of where I started. This is the best imagery I can use to explain that I am so conservative on some issues that I become a liberal. Take for example, the supposedly conservative idea that there should be a constitutional amendment defining marriage.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | September 5, 2008
Barack Obama. Hillary Clinton. John McCain. George W. Bush. Ted Stevens. If you can't find some humor in that bunch ... man, you ain't tryin'. And rest assured, the men and women of DeFace the Nation, Second City's all-political revue, will be tryin' with everything they've got when they appear at Towson University's Stephens Hall Theatre. For decades, the satirists and absurdists of second City have been taking aim at the entire range of the political spectrum, leaving no ideology unchallenged, no sacred cow unscathed.
NEWS
By Vita Bekker and Richard Boudreaux and Vita Bekker and Richard Boudreaux,Los Angeles Times | May 4, 2007
Tel Aviv, Israel -- Under a banner reading "Failures, Go Home," tens of thousands of Israelis from across the political spectrum joined last night in demanding the resignations of Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and his defense minister for their performance during last summer's war in Lebanon. The Israeli leader remained defiant, telling aides that the size and diversity of the crowd would not dissuade him from staying in office. Police said more than 100,000 demonstrators filled Rabin Square in front of City Hall and spilled into surrounding streets.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,Washington Bureau Staff writer Gilbert A. Lewthwaite contributed to this article | November 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton surrounded himself yesterday with Big Names in an extraordinary White House rally in favor of the North American Free Trade Agreement that had more of the flavor of a religious revival than an economic debate.Paul Samuelson, a Nobel Prize-winning economist, spoke of "the age of miracles" not being over; the president appeared to be saying a prayer for members of Congress; and former President Jimmy Carter called on everyone in the room to make 12 proselytizing calls to win converts to the NAFTA faith.
NEWS
By Clara Germani and Clara Germani,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 20, 1995
MOSCOW -- Behind the vinyl-padded, triple-locked apartmentdoors at 9 Slavyansky Blvd. lies one of the biggest problems of Russia's parliamentary election season: confusion.Campaign workers from no fewer than 67 registered political parties are knocking on doors at buildings like this one every evening, trying to coax from the electorate the 200,000 signatures each of the parties needs by Oct. 22 to qualify for December elections to the Duma, as parliament is called.Between the doors answered by barking guard dogs, scolding grandmothers and drunken men of the house at 9 Slavyansky, signature collector Eduard Glezin hears a constant theme: There are too many parties, and no one is quite sure what any party stands for.Mr.
FEATURES
By Michael Hill | October 23, 1990
Norman Solomon says that if people could take one lesson from the book he co-authored, "Unreliable Sources," it would be to trust themselves and their own judgment before they trust that of the people they watch on television."
NEWS
By Vita Bekker and Richard Boudreaux and Vita Bekker and Richard Boudreaux,Los Angeles Times | May 4, 2007
Tel Aviv, Israel -- Under a banner reading "Failures, Go Home," tens of thousands of Israelis from across the political spectrum joined last night in demanding the resignations of Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and his defense minister for their performance during last summer's war in Lebanon. The Israeli leader remained defiant, telling aides that the size and diversity of the crowd would not dissuade him from staying in office. Police said more than 100,000 demonstrators filled Rabin Square in front of City Hall and spilled into surrounding streets.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | April 27, 2006
Milton, thou should'st be living at this hour, Baltimore hath need of thee. - After William Wordsworth's "London, 1802" If a city can love, surely this one loved Milton Bates. Broadly speaking, he was a Baltimore archetype, the tin man, a practitioner of the home improvement arts. "Winder man to the world," someone called him. In a business not always known for its fair dealing, he was a paragon. He loved the story of Willie Blank, who would close the deal, turn to his customer and say, "By the way, some of our customers like to have glass in their windows.
NEWS
By David Domke | August 1, 2005
JUDITH MILLER, The New York Times and some members of Congress picked a bad time to make a stand for journalistic integrity. Ms. Miller, a Times reporter, is in jail for not revealing the identity of a White House source in the case of outed CIA operative Valerie Plame, whose husband is a vocal critic of the Iraq war. The Times has stood behind Ms. Miller, declaring that the relationship between reporters and sources requires sacred trust. In response, a bipartisan bill now in Congress would compel journalists to testify only when "imminent and actual harm to national security" is at stake.
NEWS
By Stephanie Simon and Stephanie Simon,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 13, 2005
ST. LOUIS - White supremacist groups around the country are moving aggressively to recruit new members by promoting their violent, racist ideologies on billboards, in radio commercials and in leaflets tossed on suburban driveways. Watching with mounting alarm, civil rights monitors say these tactics stake out a much bolder, more public role for many hate groups, which are trying to shed their image as shadowy extremists and claim more mainstream support. Watchdog groups fear increased violence from these organizations as they grow.
NEWS
By Paul Moore | August 22, 2004
WHAT CONSTITUTES fair and balanced reporting, especially in politics, is foremost in the minds of readers. The difficulty is how one defines fair and balanced. For some it means having all sides of an issue in every article. For others it means that every article - on any point on the political spectrum - must be in the same news space as any preceding political story. For still others it is whether the article confirms or opposes their preconceived point of view. Sam Davis, of Towson, said that a July 29 Sun article about John Kerry and several of his former Vietnam Swift boat comrades was not balanced because it failed to mention that a group, "Swift Boat Veterans for Truth," had challenged accounts of Mr. Kerry's actions in combat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victoria A. Brownworth and Victoria A. Brownworth,Special to the Sun | June 27, 2004
On May 17, 2004, the 50th anniversary of the historic U.S. Supreme Court civil-rights ruling Brown v. Topeka Board of Education, another civil-rights milestone was reached. In Massachusetts, thousands of lesbians and gay men were married -- the first legal same-sex marriages in the United States. (Same-sex marriage is legal in several other countries, including Canada.) For those like the two men who had been together for 51 years or the lesbians who tied the knot after 27 years and three children together, the legal recognition of their love and commitment was long-awaited and hard-won.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 3, 2000
WASHINGTON - Politics is often a game of numbers, and some political activists are paying attention today to a new Supreme Court statistic. On this day, the court sets a modern record: exactly six years without a vacancy, the longest period of stability in its membership in 177 years. The newest justice, Stephen G. Breyer, took his oath Aug. 3, 1994. That may have significance in the presidential campaign, because it could deepen speculation that it will not be long before there are vacancies, giving the next president an early chance to name justices.
NEWS
By Jan C. Greenburg and Jan C. Greenburg,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 16, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to step into a lawsuit by two public interest groups that argue that Vice President Dick Cheney cannot flatly refuse to disclose information about the workings of his confidential energy task force. The groups, Judicial Watch and the Sierra Club, say energy industry officials might have had undue influence on the task force's recommendations and administration energy policy. They sued in 2001 to get more details about the task force's membership and how it made its recommendations.
NEWS
By Jan C. Greenburg and Jan C. Greenburg,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 16, 2003
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court agreed yesterday to step into a lawsuit by two public interest groups that argue that Vice President Dick Cheney cannot flatly refuse to disclose information about the workings of his confidential energy task force. The groups, Judicial Watch and the Sierra Club, say energy industry officials might have had undue influence on the task force's recommendations and administration energy policy. They sued in 2001 to get more details about the task force's membership and how it made its recommendations.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2003
The Rev. Tom Grey has never been one to run from a fight - even when the odds are stacked against him. And the odds are seldom with the Illinois-based, anti-gambling activist as he battles aggressive campaigns by deep-pocket gambling interests to expand to an ever-growing number of states. In Maryland, though, Grey sees a good opportunity for success. He says he likes his chances. If the right grass-roots mix of civic, religious, political and business groups come together and generate enough heat, Grey says, they can sink Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s plan to allow 10,500 slot machines at four Maryland racetracks.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.