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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN REPORTER | May 22, 2007
Michael Baruch Grossman, a retired Towson University professor who had been chairman of the department of political sciences and wrote about the White House press corps, died of pancreatic cancer May 14 at his home in Oakland, Calif. The former Towson resident was 70. Born in Boston, he earned a bachelor's degree at Oberlin College in 1957. He worked briefly as a reporter at The Washington Post and served in the Army before earning his doctorate in political science from the Johns Hopkins University.
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NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2014
Mary Elizabeth Dyer Corrin, a code-breaker during World War II and former teacher at two Towson-area elementary schools, died June 30 of lung cancer at the Blakehurst retirement community. She was 92. The daughter of Navy Vice Adm. George C. Dyer, Mrs. Corrin was born in Manila in the Philippines; by the time she graduated from high school, she told her family later, she had attended 22 different schools. While her family was stationed in Hawaii, Mrs. Corrin traveled by boat and train to attend Smith College in Massachusetts, where she majored in math.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2005
Dr. Francis E. Rourke, a retired Johns Hopkins University political science professor who wrote extensively on politics and government, died Saturday of congestive heart failure and pneumonia at the Chestnut Green, Towson nursing home. A Stoneleigh resident for nearly 40 years, he was 82. Born in New Haven, Conn., Dr. Rourke attended Yale University on a merit scholarship. He taught political science there and at the University of Minnesota, from which he received a doctorate in 1952. He joined the Hopkins faculty in 1954 and taught there for four decades.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
A lot of people are talking about the 2014 race for governor today -- nothing like a few big announcements to stir the pot -- so I figured I'd take the opportunity to bring up the big LGBT storyline in the race. That is to say, Del. Heather Mizeur's expected candidacy. The out lesbian from Montgomery County is expected to run for Gov. Martin O'Malley's seat and has said she plans to make an announcement about her future in politics this summer. She stands with Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown and Attorney General Doug Gansler in the Democratic lineup of presumed hopefuls who people are talking about, and her campaign has framed her candidacy in very clear terms.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | June 10, 2011
Barry Virum Bowen, a retired University of Baltimore professor of political science, died May 30 from complications of a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care. The Lutherville resident was 80. The son of newspaper parents, Dr. Bowen was born and raised in Milwaukee, where he graduated from high school. After graduating from the Naval Academy in 1955, he served in the Navy as a flight instructor for three years. He earned a master's degree from the University of Hawaii and his doctorate from George Washington University.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | August 18, 2007
Milton C. Cummings Jr., an author and nationally recognized expert on the U.S. Congress who taught political science at the Johns Hopkins University for nearly 40 years, died Aug. 10 of prostate cancer at a son's home in New Vernon, N.J. He was 74. "He was one of the great American political science professors of his generation," said Thomas Greene a retired Foreign Service officer and friend since their student days at Swarthmore College. "He had a great feel for American political development and could research issues that have a partisan thrust in neutral terms without taking sides.
NEWS
December 14, 1993
Services for William M. David Jr., professor emeritus of political science at Western Maryland College where he also chaired the department and served as dean of men, were held Sunday at the college, not Monday as reported in Sunday's paper.The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
December 2, 1990
WESTMINSTER - James Nathanson, deputy political director of the Republican National Committee, will speak before a political science class at Western Maryland College from 1:40 to 2:40 p.m. Wednesday in Room 308 of Memorial Hall.The talk is free and open to the public.Nathanson, who served as executive director of the 1988 Bush-Quayle presidential campaign in Ohio before assuming the deputy political director position last year, will discuss the role of the RNC in political campaigns. The class he will lecture, "Political Participation," is taught by Herb Smith, professor of political science at Western Maryland.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | December 21, 1998
Tai Sung An, a retired professor at Washington College in Chestertown who was an authority on Vietnamese politics, died of lung failure Wednesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital.Mr. An, who was 67 and lived in Chestertown, wrote books on Asian communism and the Vietnam War and his articles appeared in newspapers and world affairs journals.He retired from teaching in May because of failing health."He devoted his entire career to teaching and to advancing the reputation of Washington College through his scholarly work," said college President John S. Toll.
NEWS
February 18, 1991
Salvatore Alfred Arcilesi, a Baltimore native and professor of political science at the Citadel in Charleston, S.C., died Feb. 1 in a Savanna, Ga., hospital and was buried in Charleston Feb. 4.Mr. Arcilesi, 57, joined the faculty of the Citadel in 1963 and was chairman of its political science department for 15 years.He attended Baltimore city schools, graduated from the Citadel in 1955 and earned a doctorate from the University of Virginia in 1965. He was a retired U.S. Air Force lieutenant colonel.
HEALTH
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2013
- Johns Hopkins Hospital's Dr. Ben Carson tested the political waters Saturday at the Conservative Political Action Conference, where many said he would be a popular Republican contender for the White House. Carson's speech was met with several standing ovations - with the most enthusiastic applause following a veiled comment about his plans after retiring from Hopkins. And he ranked well in a straw poll, where he was on the ballot against nearly two dozen of the nation's most prominent conservative voices.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | January 31, 2013
What if, during the presidential campaign, Mitt Romney had accused President Barack Obama of wanting to let servicewomen serve in combat? After all, Mr. Obama had hinted as much in 2008. What would Mr. Obama's response have been? My hunch is that he would have accused Mr. Romney of practicing the "politics of division" or some such and denied it. In any case, wouldn't an open debate have been better than putting women into combat by fiat? You'd think the folks who are always clamoring for a "national conversation" on this, that and the other thing would prefer to make a sweeping change after, you know, a national conversation.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | November 25, 2012
Mildred Otenasek, a pioneering force for women in Maryland Democratic politics and a much-loved professor and mentor at her alma mater, Notre Dame of Maryland University, died Nov. 19 at her home in Roland Park. She was 98. A diminutive, soft-spoken woman with a fierce intellect and a determination to both succeed and blaze a path for the women who would follow her, Mrs. Otenasek became a driving force in politics, including a stint as the first female member of the Democratic National Committee for Maryland.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Voters in Maryland's 6th Congressional District have been hearing a familiar Arkansas drawl on the phone this week: It's Bill Clinton calling, letting them know he thinks the world of Democratic candidate John Delaney. All over the state, Marylanders have been receiving robocalls from celebrities and elected officials delivering messages for or against state ballot issues or political candidates. The voices of "Desperate Housewives" actress Eva Longoria and magician David Copperfield tout the advantages of expanded gambling.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2012
One in a series of profiles of Maryland delegates to the Republican National Convention She graduated in 1989 with a degree in political science, but politics never held Deb Rey's interest. Like most people coming out of college, she was mainly concerned with finding a job. It wasn't until 11 years later, when George W. Bush won his first presidential election, that Rey got hooked (she was "ecstatic" to get rid of Bill Clinton). Now, the 45-year-old Air Force retiree from St. Mary's County is working to get high school students engaged in politics earlier than she was. "You're not seeing a lot of young, young kids involved," said Rey, who has been visiting high schools to register students to vote.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2012
In a sign of lofty national ambitions, Gov.Martin O'Malleyhas created a federal political action committee that could become a financial vehicle for a presidential run in 2016. O'Malley spokesman Rick Abbruzzese confirmed Thursday that O'Malley has registered what is being called the O Say Can You See PAC with the Federal Election Commission. The PAC gives the governor a federal political vehicle for spending on races at both the national and state level. Creation of the PAC was first reported Wednesday in the Washington publication Roll Call.
NEWS
By Special to The Carroll County Sun | February 23, 1992
Special to The Carroll County SunLongtime Western Maryland College tennis coach and political science professor Frank Benjamin Hurt died last Sunday in his Ferrum, Va., home of cancer at 92.Hurt spent 31 years as Western Maryland's tennis coach, amassing a record of 243 wins, 172 losses, for a percentage of .629. In 1981, the college courts were named in his honor.One of the highlights of Hurt's academic career was his participation in 1963 in the American Political ScienceAssociation World Tour Seminar.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 26, 2012
A Maryland organization says it has found hundreds of dead people listed on voter registration rolls in Baltimore and Prince George's counties, as well as residents who have registered in multiple places and some who have addresses that turn out to be vacant lots. This November, the group says it plans to fan out to polls to watch for problems - but critics say the effort is a smoke screen for a political agenda. Election Integrity Maryland, which is part of a network of volunteers digging through registration lists across the country, says its mission is to ensure the accuracy of voter registration rolls and encourage citizens to participate in the process.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 9, 2012
Richard Thomas Yates, a former Carroll County commissioner who fought in Europe during World War II, died of aortic stenosis Monday at Dove House Hospice in Westminster. The longtime Sykesville resident was 86. The son of a horse trainer and a homemaker, Mr. Yates was born in Baltimore and raised on Arunah Avenue. After quitting Forest Park High School in his junior year, he was drafted into the Army in 1943. He was assigned to the 314th Regiment of the 79th Division during training in Arizona and Kansas, and in 1944 was shipped overseas to England.
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