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By J. Wynn Rousuck | October 19, 1990
Gross National Product, a political satire troupe out of Washington, has been making overtures north lately. The 10-year-old company played three test Sundays here last July, and now has settled in for what it hopes will be a regular gig at Slapstix Comedy Club.Despite the show's title, "BushCapades, An Administration on Thin Ice," GNP is performing at least as much improvisation and general-interest material as political humor.Perhaps GNP felt that Baltimoreans aren't as politically astute as our neighbors in the nation's capital.
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By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
Standing in a pile of construction rubble on a cold and dirty location set at the Lord Baltimore Hotel here in January, I didn't know what to expect from Season 3 of HBO's "Veep. " Everyone in the cast and crew, including star Julia Louis-Dreyfus, seemed to be suffering from a chest-busting virus that was signaled by the most awful-sounding cough. Grim doesn't start to describe the mood as they prepped for the filming of a scene featuring a make-believe employment conference. Director Chris Addington suddenly found himself after a post-lunch conversation with Louis-Dreyfus confronted with the need for a serious rewrite of the scene he was about to shoot.
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By Michael Hill | October 25, 1991
Political satire is a genre best left to the British, as this weekend's new "Masterpiece Theatre" demonstrates once again.Whether it's a lack of nerve in Hollywood, our incessant need to put everything in its proper drama-or-comedy category, or perhaps the inability of Americans to put aside their political passions for the purposes of entertainment, the closest we get to this art form is usually the odd episode of "The Simpsons." And they get away with it only because it's a cartoon.But as "Sleepers," the four-part, four-hour production that begins Sunday night at 9 o'clock on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67, shows once again, the British love taking politics and putting it on a long skewer so it can be held over the coals until it turns red with embarrassment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2013
If you don't think TV is in the midst of revolutionary change, go to Amazon.com this weekend and instead of buying a book or baby food, take a look at the online giant's original production of "Alpha House. " It's a political satire written and produced by "Doonesbury" creator Garry Trudeau starring John Goodman and Clark Johnson. It's set in a house on Capitol Hill that four Republican members of the U.S. Senate share, and the first three episodes can be streamed for free this week.
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By Phyllis Brill and Phyllis Brill,Staff Writer | May 7, 1992
When the Montana Logging & Ballet Company takes over the stage at Centennial High School in Ellicott City tomorrow night they won't be toting timber and they won't be wearing tights. In fact, the only thing accurate about the name of this four-man political satire group is that they come from Montana.What they will do on stage is sing, joke, mime, mug and generally clown around about every subject under the sun, as long as its politically topical or socially significant.Their tools are harmony, wit, a half-dozen musical instruments and an endless amount of physical energy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
"VEEP," the Baltimore-made political satire starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus, will start its second season April 14, HBO announced Monday. Here is the release from HBO:             The Emmy®-nominated comedy series VEEP kicks off its ten-episode second season SUNDAY, APRIL 14 (10:00-10:30 p.m. ET/PT), exclusively on HBO. Created by Armando Iannucci (Oscar® nominee for co-writing “In the Loop”), the show stars Emmy®-winner Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Selina Meyer, who becomes vice president, only to discover the job is nothing like she expected, but everything she was warned about.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 4, 2001
He's an idiot, but he's our idiot. And don't you think he's kind of lovable in his utter stupidity? That's the overall tone of "That's My Bush!" - the much-anticipated satire of President George W. Bush from "South Park" creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone. As political satire, there is not much to get excited about here. But, in the context of what Parker and Stone say they set out to do - parody the sitcom genre itself - the first two episodes have some good moments. And as to what really matters for many Parker and Stone fans: The two also have created moments that are sure to offend some viewers and be discussed the morning after.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 17, 1998
Al Franken is a big, fat genius.OK, he's not fat, but he sure helped create a smart sitcom in "Lateline," which premieres tonight on NBC.Franken, a five-time Emmy award winner for his work on "Saturday Night Live" and author of the best-selling "Rush Limbaugh Is a Big, Fat Idiot and Other Observations," is one of our best political satirists. And, boy, do we need political satire in prime time today.Outside of "Murphy Brown" (which is about to end) and "Spin City" (which is about local politics in New York City)
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By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 22, 1998
In the scorchingly funny political satire "Bulworth," Warren Beatty is a man possessed, a holy fool tilting at the windmills of contemporary political culture, an idiot worthy of Dostoevsky, whose compulsive, vulgar pronouncements take on the proportions of greatness the more he blathers on.Love "Bulworth" or hate it. Laugh at it or moan out loud. But by all means see it, and celebrate the fact that a mainstream movie has been made in which something of real meaning is at stake.Beatty -- who wrote, directed and produced -- also stars in the title role of Jay Bulworth, a Democratic senator from California who is just days away from a shoo-in re-election.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | June 13, 1995
In describing the purpose of the political satire, Kevin Kallaugher quotes "that great English philosopher," Mary Poppins: " 'A spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down.' ""That's pretty much what the political cartoon or political satire does," says Kallaugher, better known as Kal, the editorial cartoonist for The Baltimore Sun and the British magazine The Economist. "It can deliver an unpalatable or unsavory message in a more pleasing style through humor or through graphic wizardry."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
"VEEP," the Baltimore-made political satire starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus, will start its second season April 14, HBO announced Monday. Here is the release from HBO:             The Emmy®-nominated comedy series VEEP kicks off its ten-episode second season SUNDAY, APRIL 14 (10:00-10:30 p.m. ET/PT), exclusively on HBO. Created by Armando Iannucci (Oscar® nominee for co-writing “In the Loop”), the show stars Emmy®-winner Julia Louis-Dreyfus as Selina Meyer, who becomes vice president, only to discover the job is nothing like she expected, but everything she was warned about.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
Baltimore gets lots of face time in “VEEP,” the Maryland-made HBO political satire starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus. But so far, all of it has been as a stand-in for Washington, the setting of this fictional series about the vice president of the United States. Last week, the Ottobar and the New Wyman Park restaurant doubled as D.C. settings for a rock concert and a breakfast meeting between two political aides. This week, however, in an episode titled “Baseball,” Baltimore gets to play itself in a story line that finds Vice President Selina Meyer (Louis-Dreyfus)
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2011
The news last week that the pilot for an HBO political satire starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus would be filmed in Baltimore starting next month was mainly treated as a local production story here. That's the way I wrote the piece online that broke the news of the filming, and that is probably as it should be. In a tough economy, the Maryland Film Office estimates that production of the pilot for a series about a woman vice president of the United States could have an economic impact in excess of $6 million and could create more than 700 jobs for Maryland crew and actors while "prepping and filming" in the state.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | January 23, 2007
WASHINGTON -- I used to wonder what the old, uh, ferrets of the newspaper business were talking about when they grew all wistful and blubbery about "the passing of an era." With the death of Art Buchwald, I no longer wonder. From at least the 1950s, he exemplified the brighter side of our business. He died last week at age 81. In June, he checked out of a hospice where he said he had grown tired of waiting to die from kidney failure. I didn't meet him until 2000, after he had suffered a stroke but had recovered well enough to resume writing his column.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | October 9, 2004
In case the Department of Homeland Security's terrorism color code isn't entertaining enough, imagine what could happen if the department actually hired someone to keep the American public amused. That's the premise of Fever Pitch, a political satire by New York's Under the Table Theatre, which has arrived at the Theatre Project just in time to change a few votes. The three-person show has its clever, comical moments, but in the end, it's scarier than it is funny, and that's probably the point.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 4, 2001
He's an idiot, but he's our idiot. And don't you think he's kind of lovable in his utter stupidity? That's the overall tone of "That's My Bush!" - the much-anticipated satire of President George W. Bush from "South Park" creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone. As political satire, there is not much to get excited about here. But, in the context of what Parker and Stone say they set out to do - parody the sitcom genre itself - the first two episodes have some good moments. And as to what really matters for many Parker and Stone fans: The two also have created moments that are sure to offend some viewers and be discussed the morning after.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
Standing in a pile of construction rubble on a cold and dirty location set at the Lord Baltimore Hotel here in January, I didn't know what to expect from Season 3 of HBO's "Veep. " Everyone in the cast and crew, including star Julia Louis-Dreyfus, seemed to be suffering from a chest-busting virus that was signaled by the most awful-sounding cough. Grim doesn't start to describe the mood as they prepped for the filming of a scene featuring a make-believe employment conference. Director Chris Addington suddenly found himself after a post-lunch conversation with Louis-Dreyfus confronted with the need for a serious rewrite of the scene he was about to shoot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
Baltimore gets lots of face time in “VEEP,” the Maryland-made HBO political satire starring Julia Louis-Dreyfus. But so far, all of it has been as a stand-in for Washington, the setting of this fictional series about the vice president of the United States. Last week, the Ottobar and the New Wyman Park restaurant doubled as D.C. settings for a rock concert and a breakfast meeting between two political aides. This week, however, in an episode titled “Baseball,” Baltimore gets to play itself in a story line that finds Vice President Selina Meyer (Louis-Dreyfus)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 22, 1998
In the scorchingly funny political satire "Bulworth," Warren Beatty is a man possessed, a holy fool tilting at the windmills of contemporary political culture, an idiot worthy of Dostoevsky, whose compulsive, vulgar pronouncements take on the proportions of greatness the more he blathers on.Love "Bulworth" or hate it. Laugh at it or moan out loud. But by all means see it, and celebrate the fact that a mainstream movie has been made in which something of real meaning is at stake.Beatty -- who wrote, directed and produced -- also stars in the title role of Jay Bulworth, a Democratic senator from California who is just days away from a shoo-in re-election.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 17, 1998
Al Franken is a big, fat genius.OK, he's not fat, but he sure helped create a smart sitcom in "Lateline," which premieres tonight on NBC.Franken, a five-time Emmy award winner for his work on "Saturday Night Live" and author of the best-selling "Rush Limbaugh Is a Big, Fat Idiot and Other Observations," is one of our best political satirists. And, boy, do we need political satire in prime time today.Outside of "Murphy Brown" (which is about to end) and "Spin City" (which is about local politics in New York City)
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