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By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau | January 28, 1994
TOKYO -- Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa sought assistance yesterday from two unlikely sources, the Japanese people and the foreign press, in his desperate battle for political reform.Mr. Hosokawa delivered a rousing speech at an emergency meeting of a private advisory group comprising business, labor, media and political leaders that was formed two years ago in another time and under another administration.The setting seemed intended to demonstrate that Mr. Hosokawa's efforts crossed all traditional lines.
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NEWS
February 11, 2013
A year ago, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced an ambitious goal to grow Baltimore's population by 10,000 families in a decade. Today, in her State of the City address, she began to lay out her vision for how to make that goal a reality. She is seeking to increase investments in the things that will make city living more attractive and to reduce the costs that make it unaffordable. Her proposals reflect a clear-eyed view of Baltimore's assets and liabilities and a remarkable willingness to take on politically unpopular causes.
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NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau The New York Times contributed to this article | November 17, 1993
TOKYO -- Japan's Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa won his job last summer. He got to keep it yesterday, in a way that moved the country closer to the most dramatic political reform since the end of World War II.Months of back-room negotiations and a final, U.S.-style, brute shove, pushed a political reform package through a critical committee of the lower house of the Diet, Japan's parliament, and on to likely passage by the full body at the end of the...
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | February 22, 2011
What an amazing month it has been in key corners of the Muslim world. Accelerated by Twitter and Facebook, and broadcast to the world through television and YouTube, revolutionaries in Bahrain, Libya, Tunisia, Yemen and especially Egypt have agitated for freedom and demanded political reform. I wonder how the news is being received by former president George W. Bush. Some of his former deputies are claiming that the changes unfolding in the Middle East and North Africa validate Mr. Bush's foreign policy doctrines and his oft-repeated mantra that freedom isn't America's gift to the world but God's gift to humanity.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Staff Writer | July 19, 1992
DALLAS -- After shutting the door on his presidential bid -- and a day later cracking it just enough to try to keep his band of followers together -- Ross Perot met yesterday with a group of his state coordinators and told them he would help bankroll and serve as national chairman for a new political reform movement.Emerging from a 2 1/2 -hour meeting with the Texas billionaire, the Perot volunteers, some of whom had hastily flown to Dallas for yesterday's closed-door session, had only the sketchiest idea of what this movement would look like, stand for or cost.
NEWS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau | April 29, 1993
TOKYO -- In a country where a single conservative party has dominated 38 years of smoke-filled rooms, suddenly the tobacco breath of every politician pleads for "kaikaku" -- reform -- with the eagerness of a suitor saying, "I love you."But like the object of a suitor's attentions, Japan is having its doubts whether this is true love or just another guy on the make.Even Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa -- who scoffed at do-gooders for three decades and only 17 months ago wrested the top job from reformer Toshiki Kaifu with the slogan "time to bring back the big boys" -- now never misses a chance to demand kaikaku in public.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau | January 2, 1994
TOKYO -- Japan's year of change has ended in gridlock.Political reform, economic reform and whatever other reform that was euphorically predicted last summer are confronting the intransigent reality of Japanese politics and Japanese society.The only real movement comes from the punishing impact of the higher yen on Japan's export-driven economy."I frankly apologize to the people," Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa said in a televised address Christmas Eve, as he acknowledged failing to pass a political reform bill by the end of the year as promised.
NEWS
August 11, 1993
With the formal election of Morihiro Hosokawa as prime minister, the new Japanese government needs to start implementing its shaky mandate. The coalition of eight parties that narrowly won last month's elections has made it clear what it is against: continued rule by the long-dominant Liberal Democrats. Now it has to show what it is for. Ousting the Liberal Democrats after 38 years of unbroken rule was difficult enough; governing Japan afterward will be more so.The election result was as much a self-inflicted wound by the Liberal Democrats as it was a political victory for the disparate melange of parties that make up the governing coalition.
NEWS
By Tyler Marshall and Tyler Marshall,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 8, 2004
HONG KONG - Hong Kong's chief executive failed to outline a much-anticipated timetable for democratic reform during his annual policy address yesterday, instead saying a task force will consult with legal experts in Beijing on the issue. During his speech to the territory's Legislative Council and at a news conference, Tung Chee-hwa said the decision to talk with the central government came at the insistence of Chinese President Hu Jintao during a meeting last month. "President Hu told me he was very concerned about this," Tung told reporters, who grilled him on the issue after the speech.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 3, 1993
TOKYO -- In a setback for the Japanese government, the defense minister was forced to resign last night after declaring that Japan's constitutional limitations on the use of military force are out of date and urging passage of an amendment to permit full participation in United Nations peacekeeping operations.The resignation of Keisuke Nakanishi, the 52-year-old director-general of Japan's Self-Defense Agency, underscores the intensity of the disagreements within the government over Japan's expanding international role, especially at a time when the country is seeking a permanent seat on the U.N. Security Council.
NEWS
By Jonathan Turley | February 15, 2010
F or decades, political reform in the United States has largely meant campaign finance reform. It is a focus the political mainstream prefers, despite the fact that it is akin to addressing an engine with a design defect by regulating the fuel. Many of our current problems are either caused or magnified by the stranglehold the two parties have on our political system. Democrats and Republicans, despite their uniformly low popularity with voters, continue to exercise a virtual monopoly, and they have no intention of relinquishing control.
NEWS
By Brian Katulis | December 28, 2007
Yesterday's murder of Pakistani opposition leader and former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto brings U.S. policy on Pakistan back into the spotlight. Having just returned from Pakistan last week, I can't say that this incident is a complete surprise. On the eve of next month's parliamentary election, tensions among Pakistan's political leaders were palpable as violence escalated. Despite rosy statements from the White House and U.S. presidential candidates about Pakistan's "march to democracy," the United States faces a complicated set of policy choices that no U.S. administration has gotten right in the 60 years of Pakistan's independence.
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Tina Susman,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 13, 2007
BAGHDAD -- Insurgents took aim again yesterday at Sunni Arabs who have joined forces with U.S. troops against al-Qaida, setting off a car bomb in Anbar province that killed at least two police, officials said in Ramadi. The Bush administration, meanwhile, stepped up pressure on the political front, sending the No. 2 State Department official to Baghdad, where he met with Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki and other Iraqi officials. A group linked to al-Qaida claimed to be holding 14 Iraqi police and soldiers to avenge Shiite attacks on Sunnis, and it threatened to kill them within 72 hours.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,Sun Staff | February 18, 2007
Moscow -- It can take as many as eight years for a case to journey, from start to finish, through the halls of justice at the European Court of Human Rights, where some 90,000 complaints are pending. Yet a plan designed to streamline the court's operation has stalled on Russia's doorstep. The nation is the lone holdout, among the 46 countries in the Council of Europe, in ratifying 2 1/2 -year-old reform measures that supporters say are badly needed to address the mounting caseload at the chronically overburdened court.
NEWS
By Julian E. Barnes and Doyle McManus and Julian E. Barnes and Doyle McManus,Los Angeles Times | October 31, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Growing numbers of U.S. military officers have begun to privately question the conventional wisdom that has guided American strategy in Iraq for more than three years - that setting a hard deadline for troop reductions would strengthen the insurgency and undermine the effort to create a stable state. The Iraqi government's failure to take measures to reduce sectarian tensions has led the U.S. officers to conclude that Iraqis will not start making difficult decisions until they are pushed.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 11, 2006
Tonight's rambling episode of Frontline asserts that from China's teeming citizenry, one man's brief, thwarted act of defiance actually changed the world. "The Tank Man," as he is called in lieu of a confirmed identity, was the Beijing obstructionist who stood in the way of a column of tanks in Tiananmen Square nearly 17 years ago. This episode (10 p.m.-11:30 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67), produced by the provocative filmmaker Antony Thomas, argues that although the Tank Man's gesture did not lead to his government's collapse after soldiers fired on peaceful protesters, it inspired reformers everywhere to challenge totalitarian oppressors.
NEWS
By Korea Herald (Seoul, South Korea) | September 6, 1991
WHETHER IT likes it or not, China has now become the world's leading defender of hard-line socialism, with North Korea and Vietnam, who espouse communism and depend heavily on the Soviet Union for economic and military aid, close behind. Inevitably, China and the like-minded governments in Asia will attempt to further close ranks against the international tide of political reform.With its ups and downs the Chinese leadership under Deng Xiaoping has steadily pursued reforms and liberalization in many aspects of Chinese society since the death of Mao Tse-tung.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 11, 2006
Tonight's rambling episode of Frontline asserts that from China's teeming citizenry, one man's brief, thwarted act of defiance actually changed the world. "The Tank Man," as he is called in lieu of a confirmed identity, was the Beijing obstructionist who stood in the way of a column of tanks in Tiananmen Square nearly 17 years ago. This episode (10 p.m.-11:30 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67), produced by the provocative filmmaker Antony Thomas, argues that although the Tank Man's gesture did not lead to his government's collapse after soldiers fired on peaceful protesters, it inspired reformers everywhere to challenge totalitarian oppressors.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | December 30, 2005
PHILADELPHIA -- Nothing better illustrates the problems of promoting Mideast democracy than the jailing of Ayman Nour in Egypt last week. Mr. Nour is a 41-year-old lawyer who challenged Egypt's authoritarian President Hosni Mubarak in the September elections. He is a secular, liberal politician who Bush administration officials hoped could demonstrate a political alternative in Egypt to repressive rulers and Islamists. Under U.S. pressure, Mr. Mubarak had opened up political competition.
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