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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 10, 1996
The religious right political movement has considerable opportunity for future growth because many of its prime potential constituents, politically-conservative evangelicals, are unfamiliar with the movement and unaware of some of its leaders, according to a poll commissioned by the American Jewish Committee.For example, only 38 percent of the nation's conservative evangelicals say they have read or heard much about the religious right; fewer than half say they support it.While 74 percent know enough about Pat Robertson -- the founder of the Christian Coalition, which is one of the most prominent organizations in the movement -- to give him a rating, only 18 percent know enough about Ralph Reed, the executive director of the coalition, to rate him.The national poll, commissioned by the American Jewish Committee and conducted by the Gallup International Institute, screened a much larger group to identify 507 conservative evangelicals and 503 other Americans, representing the rest of society.
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NEWS
December 13, 2011
Although some of the Occupy Baltimore protesters are expressing disappointment and anger at their early morning rousting from their McKeldin Square encampment, both they and the Baltimore Police Department deserve congratulations for peacefully handling the kind of encounter that has led to violence and destruction in other cities. It would not have served the interests of either the police or the protesters to have a confrontation in which dozens of activists — and the homeless and others who had been welcomed in the encampment — were hauled off to jail.
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NEWS
October 23, 2011
I watched shaking my head as Vice President Joe Biden pleaded with Republicans to pass the bill funding police, firefighters and teachers' jobs. But it was only last week that the administration had $20 billion on hand left over from the first stimulus, and it was rushing to find green companies worthy of investing in. Are these the best political minds this country has to offer? This is the same administration that encourages and embraces the Wall Street occupiers who have cost cities across the country millions of dollars in police overtime pay. One moment they are telling liberal demonstrators to keep doing what they're doing, hoping their protests will blossom into a left-wing backlash against the tea party.
NEWS
October 23, 2011
I watched shaking my head as Vice President Joe Biden pleaded with Republicans to pass the bill funding police, firefighters and teachers' jobs. But it was only last week that the administration had $20 billion on hand left over from the first stimulus, and it was rushing to find green companies worthy of investing in. Are these the best political minds this country has to offer? This is the same administration that encourages and embraces the Wall Street occupiers who have cost cities across the country millions of dollars in police overtime pay. One moment they are telling liberal demonstrators to keep doing what they're doing, hoping their protests will blossom into a left-wing backlash against the tea party.
NEWS
February 20, 1991
The first weekend in February saw the annual conference of Sinn Fein at Mansion House, the residence of the lord mayor of Dublin. Sinn Fein is the above-ground political wing of the Irish Republican movement of which the Irish Republican Army is the illegal military wing. Sinn Fein has hit a high above 10 percent of the vote in Northern Ireland and about 3 percent in the Irish Republic. Its president, Gerry Adams, was elected to the British House of Commons from West Belfast but refused to take his seat.
NEWS
May 16, 2007
The Rev. Jerry Falwell's greatest gift was that he knew how to tap into the discomfort of ordinary, churchgoing Joes and Janes who toward the last third of the 20th century felt like their country had been hijacked. Legalized abortion, pornography, prayer banned from schools, anti-war protests, equal rights, homosexuality, gambling, sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll - the enormous legal and cultural changes under way liberated at least one generation, but tormented another. As one of the era's first televangelists, Mr. Falwell tapped into that torment to help build a political movement that only now - nearly three decades later - appears to be in its twilight.
NEWS
February 11, 1994
H. Ross Perot, at his first meeting with all the state directors and state chairs of United We Stand, America (UWSA) last weekend, said to the Washington political establishment, "[you] ain't seen nothing yet."That's true -- in a sense that he surely didn't intend. His one attempt to directly affect a political outcome since the presidential election was one big nothing. That was his and his organization's effort to defeat the North American Free Trade Agreement. Congress probably would have passed NAFTA even Mr. Perot had stayed out of it, but his terrible performance in debating the issue with Vice President Al Gore on national television helped the pro-NAFTA side.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | December 1, 2005
JERUSALEM -- By almost every measure, Shimon Peres and Ariel Sharon make for a strange pairing. Prime Minister Sharon, 77, is a physically imposing retired general and farmer who has fought in every major Israeli war, led the country into a disastrous campaign in Lebanon and earned an international reputation as Israel's most hard-line leader. Peres, 82, is a slight Nobel Peace Prize winner who, despite a reputation as a loser in Israeli politics, has endeared himself to the West as one of Israel's doves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chauncey Mabe and Chauncey Mabe,knight ridder/tribune | November 24, 2002
Nikki Giovanni, who emerged from the 1960s as one of the leading black poets of revolution, says she remains as radical as ever. Single motherhood, a bout with lung cancer, showers of literary awards and an academic career have enriched but not blunted her edge, as demonstrated in some of the poems from her latest collection, Quilting the Black-Eyed Pea. "I'm still anti-war," Giovanni says from her office at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., where she's...
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 18, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Concluding a stormy investigation, the House ethics committee voted 7-1 last night to reprimand Speaker Newt Gingrich and to fine him $300,000 as punishment for his ethics violations.The sanction, negotiated with lawyers for Gingrich nearly a month ago and accepted by the speaker, will allow him to retain his leadership post. But if the House votes as expected Tuesday to uphold the punishment, Gingrich will be saddled with the distinction of being the first House speaker ever disciplined by his colleagues.
NEWS
May 16, 2007
The Rev. Jerry Falwell's greatest gift was that he knew how to tap into the discomfort of ordinary, churchgoing Joes and Janes who toward the last third of the 20th century felt like their country had been hijacked. Legalized abortion, pornography, prayer banned from schools, anti-war protests, equal rights, homosexuality, gambling, sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll - the enormous legal and cultural changes under way liberated at least one generation, but tormented another. As one of the era's first televangelists, Mr. Falwell tapped into that torment to help build a political movement that only now - nearly three decades later - appears to be in its twilight.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | December 1, 2005
JERUSALEM -- By almost every measure, Shimon Peres and Ariel Sharon make for a strange pairing. Prime Minister Sharon, 77, is a physically imposing retired general and farmer who has fought in every major Israeli war, led the country into a disastrous campaign in Lebanon and earned an international reputation as Israel's most hard-line leader. Peres, 82, is a slight Nobel Peace Prize winner who, despite a reputation as a loser in Israeli politics, has endeared himself to the West as one of Israel's doves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | November 16, 2003
Reviled as the world's most devastating terrorist attack, Sept. 11 has been a political failure so far. And the ideology that fueled it, Political Islam, has fared little better. Political Islam may seem like the new threat to most Americans, but it has been on a losing streak for the past decade - humiliated in Afghanistan, bloodied in Algeria, chastened in Turkey and besieged in Iran. Instead of a major blow in a long war by militant Islamists, Sept. 11 may be seen one day as an act of frustration driven by a fading ideology.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 9, 2003
AMARI REFUGEE CAMP, West Bank - His face unshaven and his clothes disheveled, Khalid Idris deftly roams the back alleys here, sleeping in a different house each night to avoid the Israeli army patrols searching for him. The burly 36-year-old is a member of the Aqsa Martyrs Brigades, the militant wing of Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat's mainstream Fatah political party. But Idris increasingly finds himself at odds with Fatah, whose leaders have repeatedly called for an end to attacks inside Israel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chauncey Mabe and Chauncey Mabe,knight ridder/tribune | November 24, 2002
Nikki Giovanni, who emerged from the 1960s as one of the leading black poets of revolution, says she remains as radical as ever. Single motherhood, a bout with lung cancer, showers of literary awards and an academic career have enriched but not blunted her edge, as demonstrated in some of the poems from her latest collection, Quilting the Black-Eyed Pea. "I'm still anti-war," Giovanni says from her office at Virginia Tech in Blacksburg, Va., where she's...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2002
When Apple Computer Inc. announced that it would discontinue software that Kevin Matthews found useful, he decided to take action in a way that the computer pioneer was sure to respect: He created a petition in cyberspace and collected signatures online. Matthews, president of Artifice Inc., which develops architectural modeling software in Eugene, Ore., said the 1999 petition failed to persuade Apple. But it did attract a community of users who are developing an open-source replacement for Apple's Quick Draw 3-D. Moreover, the software Matthews devised to collect signatures spawned www.PetitionOnline.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | August 17, 1994
Only 20 years old, William P. "Skip" Gibson of Hampstead has already had more political experience and worldly adventures than most people have in a much longer life.Mr. Gibson is a senior at Washington College in Chestertown majoring in international studies and planning a career in public service. Toward that end, he has completed two internships in very different parts of the world in the past seven months.In London last winter, he worked for almost three months for a lobbying group, Charter 88. On the Caribbean island of Barbados, he worked this summer at the U.S. Embassy.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | June 14, 1995
WASHINGTON -- In its ruling on affirmative action, the Supreme Court once again seems to be just about where the country is on a controversial issue.Opinion polls have been finding for months that most voters are highly critical of affirmative action programs that result in what they see as "reverse discrimination," as was the perception in the Colorado case on which the court made its 5-4 ruling.But those same polls also have shown some reluctance to abandon the idea entirely -- a position with which the conservative majority seemed to agree with its finding that some programs might be acceptable if they passed the "strict scrutiny" standard applied to the states since 1989.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,SUN STAFF | May 14, 1997
Metro Baltimore's most important business group says it will shift its focus to regional cooperation and "start talking about issues that aren't politically safe" such as municipal tax sharing and cross-boundary housing policies.The Greater Baltimore Committee's "primary focus" will be finding ways "for solving problems on a regional basis," GBC President Donald P. Hutchinson said yesterday. The switch promises to stoke the debate on what duties satellite counties owe to Baltimore.Founded in 1955 to spawn building projects in downtown Baltimore, the GBC has been regional in name but parochial in practice.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 18, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Concluding a stormy investigation, the House ethics committee voted 7-1 last night to reprimand Speaker Newt Gingrich and to fine him $300,000 as punishment for his ethics violations.The sanction, negotiated with lawyers for Gingrich nearly a month ago and accepted by the speaker, will allow him to retain his leadership post. But if the House votes as expected Tuesday to uphold the punishment, Gingrich will be saddled with the distinction of being the first House speaker ever disciplined by his colleagues.
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