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NEWS
By BEN JORAVSKY | March 27, 1994
Chicago -- It has been clear since the first whiff of Whitewater wafted north from Little Rock, Ark., that what we have here is not so much a scandal as the death of a Great Political Machine.Obviously, this machine's a little different than most, at least in appearance -- not a fedora or pinky ring in this bunch. Still, the tell-tale signs are there: You've got a cast of characters, nestled together for far too long in the insulated confines of power. For 10 years their friend, Bill Clinton, was governor.
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NEWS
By Greg Kline | February 4, 2014
As I noted last week , it has become more apparent that Maryland's Democratic leaders are furiously trying to move past the debacle that has been the rollout of Maryland's health care exchange.  After publicly heeding calls for hearings, leaders in both the State Senate and House of Delegates are pushing off any real investigation until after the June primary. To those willing to see it, this is simply cover for the favorite candidate of the state's Democrat oligarchs, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Victor Godinez and Victor Godinez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 9, 2004
There are eight long weeks until the presidential election, but now you can take matters into your own hands. The new PC game The Political Machine makes you the campaign manager for a presidential hopeful, steering your candidate to victory. It's a strong performance, but the Ubisoft game doesn't quite score a landslide victory. All your favorite real-life politicians - from President Bush to John Kerry to Hillary Clinton to Arnold Schwarzenegger, plus dozens more - are available for you to direct at your pleasure.
NEWS
December 28, 2013
The outrage industry was in high dudgeon just before Christmas over remarks "Duck Dynasty" family patriarch, Phil Robertson, made to GQ magazine about homosexuality. Outrage is the primary ingredient for political fundraising and political power. One must always have an enemy. Let's go down the "I Take Offense" checklist and make sure all the boxes were "ticked" before considering a larger point. -- Liberal New York writer goes slumming among the hayseeds in Louisiana and deliberately creates a controversy by asking a Bible-loving Christian to define sin. Check.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2003
If the pecking-order politics of the Eastside Democratic Organization were to prevail in Baltimore's Sept. 9 primary, City Councilman Bernard C. "Jack" Young would easily defeat his council colleague, Pamela V. Carter, in the 12th District race. The organization has long been East Baltimore's pre-eminent political powerbroker, and the group's endorsement helps -- though does not guarantee -- a candidate's chances of winning. Both Young and Carter have long been loyal EDO members, but only one of them can win in the newly configured council district.
NEWS
November 7, 2001
PAMELA V. CARTER has the necessary credentials to succeed the late Bea Gaddy on the Baltimore City Council. That's why East Baltimore's dominant political machine did her no favors by turning the selection process into a mockery. It pretended to consider 11 other candidates even after having anointed Ms. Carter in a smoke-filled room. This charade was fully in keeping with the ways the Eastside Democratic Organization operates. But it was an affront to the memory of Bea Gaddy, an advocate for the homeless and champion of the downtrodden.
NEWS
By Greg Kline | February 4, 2014
As I noted last week , it has become more apparent that Maryland's Democratic leaders are furiously trying to move past the debacle that has been the rollout of Maryland's health care exchange.  After publicly heeding calls for hearings, leaders in both the State Senate and House of Delegates are pushing off any real investigation until after the June primary. To those willing to see it, this is simply cover for the favorite candidate of the state's Democrat oligarchs, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janice Park and Janice Park,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 6, 2004
People who eat, breathe and live politics can run a political campaign in the free world the way they always wanted to - a computerized version, at least - thanks to Stardock Entertainment. The Political Machine is a strategy game that forces players to make the calls that they believe will put their candidate into the White House as players become campaign managers for their favorite horse in the U.S. presidential race. A nightmare for those wracked by indecision and a challenge for people who would love to take a crack at engineering a bid for the Oval Office, The Political Machine makes PC players decide what sorts of advertising to get out about the candidate and his opponents, what the campaign speeches should say to specific constituencies, and whether a candidate should show up on a cable television pundit's show.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | March 31, 2007
If the term "b'hoys" and "muldoons" resonates with you, you're showing your age. Last week, The Sun used the word "muldoon," in a story about Maurice R. "Mo" Wyatt. Wyatt had been Gov. Marvin Mandel's legislative lobbyist, appointments secretary and keeper of the "Green Bag," from which hundreds of patronage jobs were dispensed during the 1970s. His name rocketed back into the news after former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell Sr. mentioned the former dapper Annapolis insider in boozy revelations to an FBI informant in an upscale restaurant.
NEWS
By Frank A. DeFilippo | April 26, 1991
AS CRUDE as the gesture was, history says City Council member Sheila Dixon had a point when she brandished her shoe at white male colleagues during the shouting match over redistricting. Dixon was demonstrating that political power in Baltimore is shifting to the other foot.It's blacks' turn, all right, and they deserve it. For in the latest turn of the screw, the politics of Mobtown has come full circle. The assertion of ethnicity has once again rearranged the map of the city.Why anyboby's surprised is the mystery.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2011
Belinda Conaway, a two-term city councilwoman, chair of the powerful budget committee and daughter of a prominent West Baltimore political family, does not fit most definitions of a political outsider. But after losing the Democratic primary to a political newcomer allied with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, Conaway has launched a write-in campaign in which she paints herself as an enemy of - and threat to - the political establishment. "The mayor, governor and other powers-that-be don't want any independent voices on the city council," Conaway told supporters at a campaign kick-off event this month.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | March 31, 2007
If the term "b'hoys" and "muldoons" resonates with you, you're showing your age. Last week, The Sun used the word "muldoon," in a story about Maurice R. "Mo" Wyatt. Wyatt had been Gov. Marvin Mandel's legislative lobbyist, appointments secretary and keeper of the "Green Bag," from which hundreds of patronage jobs were dispensed during the 1970s. His name rocketed back into the news after former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell Sr. mentioned the former dapper Annapolis insider in boozy revelations to an FBI informant in an upscale restaurant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Victor Godinez and Victor Godinez,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | September 9, 2004
There are eight long weeks until the presidential election, but now you can take matters into your own hands. The new PC game The Political Machine makes you the campaign manager for a presidential hopeful, steering your candidate to victory. It's a strong performance, but the Ubisoft game doesn't quite score a landslide victory. All your favorite real-life politicians - from President Bush to John Kerry to Hillary Clinton to Arnold Schwarzenegger, plus dozens more - are available for you to direct at your pleasure.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janice Park and Janice Park,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 6, 2004
People who eat, breathe and live politics can run a political campaign in the free world the way they always wanted to - a computerized version, at least - thanks to Stardock Entertainment. The Political Machine is a strategy game that forces players to make the calls that they believe will put their candidate into the White House as players become campaign managers for their favorite horse in the U.S. presidential race. A nightmare for those wracked by indecision and a challenge for people who would love to take a crack at engineering a bid for the Oval Office, The Political Machine makes PC players decide what sorts of advertising to get out about the candidate and his opponents, what the campaign speeches should say to specific constituencies, and whether a candidate should show up on a cable television pundit's show.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2003
If the pecking-order politics of the Eastside Democratic Organization were to prevail in Baltimore's Sept. 9 primary, City Councilman Bernard C. "Jack" Young would easily defeat his council colleague, Pamela V. Carter, in the 12th District race. The organization has long been East Baltimore's pre-eminent political powerbroker, and the group's endorsement helps -- though does not guarantee -- a candidate's chances of winning. Both Young and Carter have long been loyal EDO members, but only one of them can win in the newly configured council district.
NEWS
November 7, 2001
PAMELA V. CARTER has the necessary credentials to succeed the late Bea Gaddy on the Baltimore City Council. That's why East Baltimore's dominant political machine did her no favors by turning the selection process into a mockery. It pretended to consider 11 other candidates even after having anointed Ms. Carter in a smoke-filled room. This charade was fully in keeping with the ways the Eastside Democratic Organization operates. But it was an affront to the memory of Bea Gaddy, an advocate for the homeless and champion of the downtrodden.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo | July 28, 1991
In the basement of Gloria Aull's Canton row house, the conversation at the kitchen table has turned from the platter full of plump red strawberries to the dry cleaner's son who happens to be a candidate for the City Council. And a Republican at that."An attorney," Mrs. Aull reads aloud from the morning newspaper."That shocks me. Is he really?" asks Dolores Canoles, as she scoops up a crackerful of vegetable dip."If he gets any votes at all," says Mrs. Aull, the gravel-voiced, silver-haired hostess of this impromptu, political kitchen klatch, "he's going to get them from people who go to his mother and father's dry cleaners.
NEWS
By Richard Reeves | April 30, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Walking onto the set of ''Capitol Watch,'' a political TV yak-fest broadcast from a warren of offices and studios spread through three townhouses here -- ''NET, Political NewsTalk Network'' reads the sign -- I thought the whole thing might be a put-on, a right-wing ''Politically Incorrect.''Two bright young men were on the air, one named Brad, who looked like Dana Carvey, and one named Mike, who looked like an agitated Steve Martin. They were in the conservative equivalent of shirtsleeves: no jacket, but cuffs buttoned.
FEATURES
By LISA POLLAK and LISA POLLAK,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1999
It was politics as usual, all right. Smiling candidates uttered vague promises about more dances and spirit days, pledging to make freshman year "a blast for everyone" while delivering "leadership for the new millennium." Teachers urged the electorate to concentrate on the issues, while disillusioned voters, decrying the influence of powerful special interest cliques, said they felt disenfranchised from a student government that had become "just a popularity contest." Unsubstantiated rumors abounded: Candidates were accused of stealing each other's posters, trading Jolly Ranchers for votes and running for office merely to beef up their college applications.
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