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By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 22, 1994
CRYSTAL CITY, Va. -- With Oliver L. North touring the state in his Winnebago, triumphantly trumpeting his military career and thousands of veterans backing his candidacy for the U.S. Senate, a panicky Sen. Charles S. Robb bolted into action this week, quickly mobilizing his own last-minute "Veterans for Robb" crusade.In a hotel meeting room Tuesday night, with cheese and crackers and dragon-red punch nestled in a corner, a couple of dozen veterans, including two fellow senators, dropped by for Mr. Robb's slap-- kickoff.
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NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | December 14, 2008
As with Illinois today, political corruption cast a pall over Maryland in the 1970s. A former governor, Spiro T. Agnew, had resigned the vice presidency in disgrace. Then Gov. Marvin Mandel was on trial for his political life. Lt. Gov. Blair Lee III imagined a kind of woodshed meeting with two of his illustrious forebears, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee and Francis Preston Blair, a newspaper editor and adviser to presidents from Andrew Jackson to Abraham Lincoln. If these two men appeared before him, he said, he'd point out that he was still there at the "same old stand" - but a bit worried.
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NEWS
By George Grella | October 6, 1991
HARLOT'S GHOST.Norman Mailer.Random House.1,334 pages. $30. Throughout his long and distinguished career, Norman Mailer has occupied a virtually unique place in American letters: the author as public person. Because he has never shrunk from controversy nor from loud and highly visible self-exposure, this position sometimes has exposed him to scorn and ridicule. If he has trumpeted his successes, he also has not sought to hide his failures in some obscure corner of the arena -- whatever he has done, right or wrong, he has displayed considerable courage.
NEWS
June 16, 2008
Keep sacraments untaited by politics David O'Brien and Lisa Sowle Cahill's column "Don't play politics with Communion" (Commentary, June 9) should be a wake-up call to American Catholic bishops. They need restate with clarity that the sacraments of the church ought not to be mixed with politics. The bishops first attempted to sort out this issue in 2004, not long after St. Louis Archbishop Raymond L. Burke proposed denying of Holy Communion to Sen. John Kerry during Mr. Kerry's presidential bid. In June of that year, the bishops released a document, "Catholics in Political Life," that attempted to ameliorate the matter by deferring to each bishop's local authority regarding candidates and Communion, admitting that "bishops can legitimately make different judgments on the most prudent course of pastoral action."
NEWS
September 23, 2007
ISSUE: -- County Executive John R. Leopold raised more than $100,000 earlier this month at an exclusive fundraiser attended mainly by developers, each of whom paid the $4,000 state maximum for a campaign contribution. Leopold, who won election in November pledging that he wouldn't be beholden to developers, said he hasn't changed and that his record bears that out. "Whether a donor gives me $4,000, $1,000 or zero dollars, it won't change the direction I will pursue in the county," he said.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | May 1, 1996
WASHINGTON -- If you were a gambler, a bet on the re-election of President Clinton would look pretty good right now. Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole, the presumptive Republican nominee, is running 15 to 20 percentage points behind the president in opinion polls and showing very little early foot as a campaigner.But the one thing that might give a gambler pause is that persistent cloud thrown over Mr. Clinton's campaign prospects by the Whitewater investigations.At this point, no one has established any wrongdoing on the part of either the president or first lady Hillary Rodham Clinton.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas and Edward Dobson | March 25, 1999
TWENTY years after the emergence of the so-called "religious right" on the American political radar screen, it is time to assess the impact and future prospects of the greatest political-religious movement since Prohibition.How close are religious conservatives to obtaining their announced goals of outlawing abortion, blunting the gay rights movement, winning the war on drugs, cleaning up Hollywood films and prime-time television and restoring a new moral order? After spending millions of conservative Christian dollars, after a White House dominated for 12 years by Ronald Reagan and George Bush and a Congress run by Republicans since 1995, are we better off today than we were 20 years ago?
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | November 4, 1996
DEERFIELD BEACH, Fla. -- -- Hillary Rodham Clinton turned up here last week at one of her favorite political venues -- Century Village, a community of some 12,000 elderly Americans, more than 9,000 of whom are registered Democrats.As candidate Bill Clinton's wife, the first lady came here four years ago just before election day and then again, with the president, as part of their kickoff for their health-care reform campaign in 1993. She is so popular here the community's medical center has been named for her.There were all the trappings of big-league politics -- 2,500 people waving Clinton-Gore signs and chanting ''four more years'' for a half-dozen television camera crews.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | May 13, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton, driven by necessity, has been out on the campaign trail on a mission roughly the equivalent of trying to reclaim his political virginity. Fat chance.The president may earn some dividends from his forays into Cleveland, Chicago and New York in the form of improved ratings in the opinion polls. But any president, even one in office only four months, has too much on the record to wipe his slate clean and begin anew.That fact of political life was never more apparent than in the futile attempts by President George Bush in late 1991 and most of 1992 to persuade the voters that he finally was getting serious about the condition of the economy.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 16, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Retired Gen. Colin L. Powell insists that nothing has changed since 1995 when, saying he had neither the passion nor commitment for elective office, he firmly declared that he would not be a candidate for the presidency or vice presidency. And yet, perhaps inevitably, a Powell buzz is in the air again. George W. Bush, the putative Republican presidential nominee, said this week that he planned to talk to the former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, one of the nation's most admired men, about a place on Bush's ticket.
NEWS
September 23, 2007
ISSUE: -- County Executive John R. Leopold raised more than $100,000 earlier this month at an exclusive fundraiser attended mainly by developers, each of whom paid the $4,000 state maximum for a campaign contribution. Leopold, who won election in November pledging that he wouldn't be beholden to developers, said he hasn't changed and that his record bears that out. "Whether a donor gives me $4,000, $1,000 or zero dollars, it won't change the direction I will pursue in the county," he said.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The seat of federal justice in Albuquerque is named for Sen. Pete V. Domenici, a former mayor and native son who showered New Mexico with federal money during his decades in Washington and was rewarded by having his name adorn the U.S. courthouse. "He does extraordinary things for this state," said Kate Nelson, managing editor of The Albuquerque Tribune and a political commentator, who dubbed Domenici, a Republican, "St. Pete" in recognition of the federal benefits he shipped west, leavened with a bit of sass for the outsized reverence in which he is held at home.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,[special to the sun] | April 8, 2007
Jacqueline Ulman was busy enough juggling career and family when her husband, Ken, who was on the Howard County Council, decided to run for county executive. Before he could formally announce, though, he had to make sure it was OK with his wife. And at first, she wasn't sure. "When he approached me, I was nine months pregnant," recalled Ulman, an energetic woman, who, like her husband, is 33 years old. "We talked, and he said, obviously he wouldn't do anything without me agreeing." It was a big decision, and Ulman wanted to make sure it was the right one, especially for their children.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | January 17, 2007
When Martin O'Malley takes the oath of office today, he will bring an end not just to Maryland's brief experiment with two-party politics. He'll also conclude our long, national history lesson on the War of 1812. O'Malley's inaugural address contains a shocker, according to a copy leaked to The Sun, and it is this: There is no mention Fort McHenry. Maryland's new governor has been in a star-spangled rut since at least 2002, when he unfurled his 19th-century battle shtick at a U.S. Senate Appropriations Committee hearing.
NEWS
By Victor Davis Hanson | November 3, 2006
Democracies have seen novelists who entered politics (Upton Sinclair and Mario Vargas Llosa). Sometimes politicians aspire to become novelists (Georges Clemenceau and Newt Gingrich). In almost every case, their fiction at one time or another was wrongly used against them in campaigns and political life - on the mistaken notion that whatever a novelist writes must reflect, even in some small way, his own views. This autumn, the Democratic candidate for the Senate in Virginia, James Webb, has been mercilessly attacked for writing sexually explicit dialogue and some perverse detail in his critically acclaimed novels.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and M. Dion Thompson and Michael Dresser and M. Dion Thompson,Sun reporters | September 14, 2006
In the end, Maryland Democrats wanted no more of William Donald Schaefer. Whether it was the unseemly behavior that became too much to ignore, or the cumulative effect of years of befriending Republicans, or simply the sense that the 84-year-old Schaefer was a relic of a bygone era, the party that nominated him for elective office since the 1950s had tired of him. When the votes were counted, Schaefer not only hadn't won, he'd finished third out of...
NEWS
June 16, 2008
Keep sacraments untaited by politics David O'Brien and Lisa Sowle Cahill's column "Don't play politics with Communion" (Commentary, June 9) should be a wake-up call to American Catholic bishops. They need restate with clarity that the sacraments of the church ought not to be mixed with politics. The bishops first attempted to sort out this issue in 2004, not long after St. Louis Archbishop Raymond L. Burke proposed denying of Holy Communion to Sen. John Kerry during Mr. Kerry's presidential bid. In June of that year, the bishops released a document, "Catholics in Political Life," that attempted to ameliorate the matter by deferring to each bishop's local authority regarding candidates and Communion, admitting that "bishops can legitimately make different judgments on the most prudent course of pastoral action."
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2000
With all the grousing about the negative tone of the presidential campaign this year, one might well wonder how the Founding Fathers would react to the sniping and back-biting. They'd probably say something like this to today's candidates: YOU CREAM-PUFFS! YOU MILKSOPS! You don't know the first thing about negative campaigning! Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, those are guys who could talk about what it's really like to get slammed. George W. Bush and Al Gore might feel aggrieved, but no one has yet called either of them a whoremonger, a charge Jefferson endured.
NEWS
By JOHN MURPHY and JOHN MURPHY,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | January 7, 2006
JERUSALEM -- On the Ben Yehuda pedestrian mall, where Israelis of all ages usually stroll and relax and shop, people yesterday found it difficult to focus on anything other than the health of Prime Minister Ariel Sharon. "All the people of Israel don't sleep at night," said Yehudit Enoshi, 58, an actress from the coastal city of Netanya. One of Sharon's greatest contributions to the country was his ability to make Israelis feel safe even during times of uncertainty, she said. But Israelis now are grappling with the fact that it would take a miracle for him to recover from the serious stroke he suffered Wednesday.
NEWS
By DAVID NITKIN and DAVID NITKIN,SUN REPORTER | October 21, 2005
A trial of former state Sen. Thomas L. Bromwell could pull some of the most influential leaders in Annapolis into a courtroom, focusing attention on how relationships between politicians and business leaders - often built through money and favors - can shape the course of legislation and state affairs. In a federal indictment released this week, prosecutors described how Bromwell and his legislative aides asked some of the most prominent figures in Annapolis to intervene on behalf of a mechanical contracting company, Poole and Kent.
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