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By Craig Timberg and Jonathan Weisman and Craig Timberg and Jonathan Weisman,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Rafael Alvarez and research librarians Sandy Levy and Dee Lyon contributed to this article | January 14, 1998
Maryland's often-felonious political history includes several cases of legislators automatically ejected for criminal behavior. There have also been others, like Robert Swailes, expelled without an accompanying criminal conviction:In 1775, just as the American Revolutionary War was beginning, Francis Baker, a Talbot County legislator, lost his seat when the assembly expelled him for violating an informal prohibition against trading with the British.During...
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NEWS
February 10, 2008
Notes The excitement of Marylanders over the state's primary election coming Tuesday is understandable. It's been a long time since national candidates have pursued the state's primary voters the way Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton are now. Those caught up in the political excitement could well enjoy some books that recall Maryland's rich political history. A good place to start would be former Democratic Gov. Harry R. Hughes' autobiography, My Unexpected Journey (History Press / 224 pages / $36.99)
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FEATURES
April 8, 2002
"If you looked up `gerrymandering' in the dictionary, you'd see this map." - Republican State Sen. J. Lowell Stoltzfus Well, not yet, Sen. Stoltzfus. But stay tuned. For now, the "gerrymander" you'll find in reference books is the winged monster an artist created in 1812 to lampoon a bizarrely reconfigured voting district in Massachusetts. The author of the district was the state's governor, Elbridge Gerry. His name, combined with a shape resembling a salamander, gave birth to the term, defined as "rearrangement of voting districts so as to favor the party in power."
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,Sun reporter | October 17, 2007
Midshipmen routinely travel all over the world as part of a burgeoning international curriculum, and in the past they have made trips to Washington to visit foreign embassies and the Supreme Court. But yesterday they made an unlikely jaunt: They walked about five minutes from the Naval Academy to the Maryland State House and went on to Annapolis City Hall for what was described as an inaugural introduction to local and state government.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Patti Waldmeir and Patti Waldmeir,Special to the Sun | September 19, 1999
"An Affair of State: The Investigation, Impeachment and Trial of President Clinton," by Richard A. Posner. Harvard University Press. 276 pages. $24.95.There is, alas, no such thing as instant hindsight. Despite our best efforts to accelerate the reflective process, the writing of history -- even the roughest drafts of it -- still takes time.So I was alarmed to discover that "An Affair of State" -- a book that promises sober analysis of the legal, moral, social, cultural and political implications of the impeachment -- was completed only four days after the trial of the president ended in the Senate.
NEWS
February 10, 2008
Notes The excitement of Marylanders over the state's primary election coming Tuesday is understandable. It's been a long time since national candidates have pursued the state's primary voters the way Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton are now. Those caught up in the political excitement could well enjoy some books that recall Maryland's rich political history. A good place to start would be former Democratic Gov. Harry R. Hughes' autobiography, My Unexpected Journey (History Press / 224 pages / $36.99)
NEWS
By Robert Kuttner | August 3, 1992
ROSS Perot, from beyond the political tomb, has proffered a plan for eliminating the deficit. Coincidentally, he is joined by a new bipartisan coalition of budget-balancers, led by former Sen. Paul Tsongas, D-Mass., and retiring Sen. Warren Rudman, R-N.H.These worthy defenders of the fisc, none of whom is putting himself before the electorate, have won praise from commentators and editorialists for having the courage to make hard choices,etc., etc. But defining budget balance as necessary-if-painful economics is based on a mistaken understanding of the economy.
NEWS
By Arch Parsons and Arch Parsons,Washington Bureau of The Sun | November 2, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Voters in the nation's capital next Tuesday will render a decision on Mayor Marion S. Barry Jr. that will be their judgment of his personal conduct as much as it will be a verdict on his political future.In personal terms, Mr. Barry, who was convicted in August of drug possession and was sentenced last month to a six-month jail term, is challenging voters to decide whether he is any longer fit for public office.Mr. Barry, having served 12 years as mayor, is seeking election to an at-large seat on the City Council.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | January 5, 2000
DES MOINES -- After the most intense runup to Iowa's kickoff precinct caucuses in political history -- nearly 700 days spent in the state by presidential candidates since 1997 -- the six surviving Republicans and two Democrats are in another battle of expectations as they head toward the first real voting of the 2000 election here on Jan. 24. Having raised record amounts of money and endorsements from most of the state's Republican establishment, the...
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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | April 26, 1994
As South Africa prepares for a historic development -- today's first nonracial elections, which are expected to produce the nation's first black president -- the PBS series "Frontline" offers a worthwhile, albeit pessimistic, portrait of two powerful forces that still rend the country.No, not blacks and whites. Nelson and Winnie Mandela.The program, likely to be updated with the latest news on recent bombings aimed at stopping the election, presents separate half-hour portraits -- of Mr. Mandela, who is expected to be elected president, and his estranged wife, projected as a rising power who could become his chief political opponent.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun Reporter | May 5, 2007
WILLIAMSBURG, Va. -- It seemed most appropriate that Queen Elizabeth II should arrive here, a place of cobblestone streets and brick storefronts frozen in time, where people in period-piece costumes talk as if they're still in the 17th-century British settlement. "Hail the Queen," someone shouted from a crowd gathered to see Her Majesty's entrance into the Governor's Palace, where she dined with the likes of Vice President Dick Cheney and former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | December 16, 2005
Four years ago, reaching into his party's vast emptiness, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. chose Michael S. Steele as his running mate. This was a good and honorable gesture because it sent a signal across Maryland's landscape: In a state with such a dubious political history (and a party with such a dreadful racial history) we finally announce that we value African-American voters, we embrace them as citizens, we respect them as serious political players. And never mind the naked expediency behind Ehrlich's choice.
NEWS
By Steve Weinberg and Steve Weinberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 25, 2005
Review: Sports History BEYOND GLORY: JOE LOUIS VS. MAX SCHMELING AND A WORLD ON THE BRINK David Margolick Alfred A. Knopf / 432 pages SIXTY-SEVEN YEARS AGO, A PROFESSIONAL boxing match between an American Negro and a German "Aryan" took on an importance far out of proportion to a mere sporting event. Many African-Americans believed that in winning the heavyweight boxing championship, Joe Louis would help usher in a new era of acceptance of blacks into the Caucasian-dominated society.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 18, 2003
HE WAS halfway across the War Memorial Plaza when they started screaming at him. They surrounded Howard "Pete" Rawlings, and squeezed in on him suffocatingly, and strode menacingly with him step by step. Rawlings did not stop. He seemed to ignore them all. They wanted him to change his mind on the next mayor of Baltimore. He wanted to change history. On that sunny summer morning four years ago, Rawlings was endorsing Martin O'Malley and not Lawrence Bell, setting off the most overtly ugly moment in modern city political history - and one of its most liberating.
TOPIC
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2002
If you watch television these days, you would think everyone running for office is trying to take medicine from your elderly parents, candy from your baby and money from your pocketbook, denying education to your children and generally subverting the American dream and ruining all that is good about this country. Such are the people who want to be our government's leaders. It's negative political advertising. "Hey, you might not like me, but my opponent is worse!" If pride in your candidate will not get you to the polls, then fear of the other guy - or gal - might.
FEATURES
April 8, 2002
"If you looked up `gerrymandering' in the dictionary, you'd see this map." - Republican State Sen. J. Lowell Stoltzfus Well, not yet, Sen. Stoltzfus. But stay tuned. For now, the "gerrymander" you'll find in reference books is the winged monster an artist created in 1812 to lampoon a bizarrely reconfigured voting district in Massachusetts. The author of the district was the state's governor, Elbridge Gerry. His name, combined with a shape resembling a salamander, gave birth to the term, defined as "rearrangement of voting districts so as to favor the party in power."
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | December 11, 1990
WASHINGTON -- The crisis in the Persian Gulf has added a complicating element to the embryonic campaign for the presidency in 1992 by offering potential Democratic candidates one more reason for moving more slowly than has been the pattern in recent campaigns.On the face of it, such Democratic caution makes sense -- at least for some prospective candidates. President Bush's political position entering the campaign could be significantly affected by his performance in resolving the crisis in the Middle East.
NEWS
By Jack Germond & Jules Witcover | March 2, 1998
WASHINGTON -- When Abe Ribicoff died the other day at 87, everyone recalled the dramatic confrontation between him and Mayor Richard J. Daley at the tumultuous 1968 Democratic convention in Chicago.It was a special moment in political history -- two leaders of the Democratic Party shouting at one another with a genuine anger that politicians rarely display in public. Reporters in the press section that night, seated only a few feet away, will never forget the episode.At the podium, Ribicoff, delivering a nominating speech for George S. McGovern, was outraged by the conduct of the Chicago police who had beaten and gassed young demonstrators against the war in Vietnam.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | August 12, 2000
Allan Charles, Baltimore advertising executive and collector of vintage advertising posters, sent me some time ago a photograph of a 1900 William Jennings Bryan campaign poster from his collection. The poster recalls the colorful days when national conventions weren't scripted, sanitized lovefests like the recently concluded Republican gathering in Philadelphia, which had all the drama of a Lawrence Welk re-run from the 1970s. They used to be heart-pounding, exciting free-for-alls, with results that weren't guaranteed with the first rap of the convention chairman's gavel.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2000
The Rouse Co., which founded Columbia as a community of diversity and tolerance, has decided to name its newest neighborhood after a U.S. senator who fought to keep his political power by depriving blacks of the right to vote. The company's development arm wants to call the 517-acre project north of Laurel Gorman's Promise after U.S. Sen. Arthur Pue Gorman, a Howard County native who was an early baseball player and the state's Democratic Party boss for 30 years. But yesterday, David E. Forester, vice president for Howard Research and Development, said the company will investigate the revelations about Gorman's efforts to disenfranchise blacks.
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