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NEWS
December 4, 2000
WITHOUT doubt, Jean-Bertrand Aristide won election as president of Haiti on Sunday. No matter that few people voted, that the opposition boycotted or that international observers boycotted, too, because of deep flaws in the legislative voting in May. Former President Aristide scrupulously observed the constitution in not taking a second term in 1995, sitting one out with his protege, Rene Preval, as president. It is still unclear whether he is a democrat or uses his Lavalas Party to intimidate the nation in the manner of past dictators.
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NEWS
November 7, 2010
Gov. Martin O'Malley won a second term last week, capturing an even larger share of the vote than the one that brought him to office four years ago. There is no doubt that the election was an affirmation of the core of his priorities as the state's chief executive — supporting K-12 and higher education, protecting the environment, expanding health care access and investing in infrastructure projects, including mass transit. But the next four years are going to demand that Mr. O'Malley do more than just hold course.
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NEWS
September 3, 1991
What happened to the Baltic states through the deadly connivance of Hitler and Stalin has finally been reversed. With the granting of U.S. diplomatic recognition, the independence of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia is now "inexorable," in the word of President Bush, and, indeed, virtually an accomplished fact. The Soviet Union is in such disarray that Western acceptance of Baltic breakaway had become as important as Soviet acquiescence, which now seems only a matter of time.Nevertheless, it is of some interest that President Bush did not await formal action by Moscow despite administration assertions last week that President Mikhail S. Gorbachev would be allowed to set the pace.
NEWS
By MICHAEL HILL and MICHAEL HILL,SUN REPORTER | December 16, 2007
According to conventional wisdom, China is marching down a road that will eventually lead to democracy. The first steps are the economic ones that China is taking, opening up a centralized economy to market forces, letting free enterprise reign. Economic growth is expected to lead to popular pressure to change a totalitarian regime into a democratic one, complete with respect for human rights. "The idea is that as per capita GDP increases, that will basically bring about all types of structural changes - increasing education, urbanization, industrialization - which will create structural conditions more favorable to a transition to democracy," she says.
NEWS
October 5, 1993
It is scary how close Boris N. Yeltsin came to losing the Battle of Moscow. Initial police response seemed disorganized and half-hearted as thousands of rebels stormed the television center and mayor's office Sunday. Only the deployment of military elite units brought the situation under control, but at a terrible loss of life. President Yeltsin is in deep debt to commanders loyal to him, particularly Gen. Pavel S. Grachev, the defense minister.Throughout seven decades of Soviet rule, the military was under tight Communist Party control.
NEWS
By David M. Anderson | December 28, 2001
WASHINGTON -- If you say that Americans are seriously opposed to the idea of sacrificing civil and political liberties for other values, then you are saying something that is true. But if you say that Americans are seriously opposed to the idea of sacrificing freedom for other values, then you are saying something that is false. For 100 years, the American political system has restricted the economic freedom of individuals and corporations in order to promote values ranging from equality to public safety.
NEWS
By A. M. Rosenthal | April 14, 1993
SINCE WORLD War II, the Arab world has failed to produce single government that shares power with its people, a single government that holds itself accountable to its people, a single government based on genuine parliamentary process, religious freedom and democratic restraints.Of all political realities, all the causes of sorrow for Arab, Jew and Christian in the Mideast, that is the most important.Hundreds of thousands of Arabs died in Arab pogroms because of it -- and millions in wars of Arab against Arab.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 20, 2004
BEIJING - Before his high-profile visit to China last week, Vice President Dick Cheney insisted that Beijing leaders allow him to speak, live and uncensored, to the Chinese people. After weeks of intensive negotiations, Cheney was granted that measure of openness - but not one millimeter more. Anyone who tuned into CCTV-4, China's all-news television channel, shortly after 10 a.m. Thursday could have watched Cheney deliver an address to students at Fudan University in Shanghai. A State Department linguist provided simultaneous interpretation.
NEWS
By A.M. Rosenthal | November 21, 1990
FIVE WORDS are missing. Cup your ear, but in all the talk about American and United Nations goals in the Iraqi crisis you will not hear certain words uttered about the future of the Arab Middle East: political freedom, democracy, human rights.But if you listen hard enough, you will hear the snickers of the "pragmatists" -- the Arabists and other diplomats in the Western capitals. They will tell you that such things are not part of Arab history, which is true, and that they never can be, which is false.
NEWS
By JONATHAN POWER | July 21, 1995
London. -- In freeing Aung San Suu Kyi from house arrest last week, Myanmar's corrupt generals have finally taken a significant step back toward 1990, when Miss Suu Kyi won over 60 percent of the vote.But whether the generals now take the road to democracy will depend on whether they judge it to be in their own economic interest. They may well persist in thinking that democracy is the enemy of progress, despite the evidence of 34 years of military rule, which has reduced their country to penury.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 27, 2004
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - When Peter-Paul Ngwenya, executive chairman of Makana Investment Corp. decided to buy a new car last month, he paid cash for a BMW 5-Series and had the dealer deliver the gleaming automobile to the front door of his spacious home nestled in the formerly all-white Johannesburg suburb of Fourways. When he was handed the keys, Ngwenya says, he had to pinch himself to believe how his fortunes had changed. Born in a black township during the most oppressive days of apartheid, he grew up smuggling grenades, AK-47s and bombs for the struggle against white rule before getting caught and banished to Robben Island prison, where he dreamt of political freedom, not the economic success he enjoys today.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 20, 2004
BEIJING - Before his high-profile visit to China last week, Vice President Dick Cheney insisted that Beijing leaders allow him to speak, live and uncensored, to the Chinese people. After weeks of intensive negotiations, Cheney was granted that measure of openness - but not one millimeter more. Anyone who tuned into CCTV-4, China's all-news television channel, shortly after 10 a.m. Thursday could have watched Cheney deliver an address to students at Fudan University in Shanghai. A State Department linguist provided simultaneous interpretation.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 12, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The U.S. administrator for Iraq said yesterday that the country's transition to independence could be marred by increased violence, but he expressed confidence that Iraqis could build a democracy that values religious and political freedom. L. Paul Bremer III, the former diplomat and counterterrorism official who has governed Iraq since May, expressed high hopes for Iraq's political future after 35 years of dictatorship and one-party rule, saying that he believes Iraqis want and understand democracy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 24, 2003
KIGALI, Rwanda - President Paul Kagame raised his fist at a rally the other day, and the thousands of people gathered around him, ethnic Hutu and Tutsi alike, did the same. "Oye!" the president yelled. "Oye!" the people responded. With days to go before the first presidential election since the mass killings in Rwanda in 1994, Kagame clearly has the crowds on his side. They wear his T-shirts and caps and wave tiny flags that his campaign puts into their hands. When he cheers, they cheer along with him. But many question whether the campaign leading up to the election tomorrow has been truly democratic.
TOPIC
By G. Jefferson Price III and G. Jefferson Price III,PERSPECTIVE EDITOR | March 3, 2002
CAIRO, Egypt - When Hosni Mubarak, the president of Egypt, comes to Washington this week, he will undoubtedly deliver the same message chanted like a mantra by Egyptian officials in this capital city - the United States' blind support of Israel is dangerously unhelpful in the abiding war with the Palestinians; putting Iraq in the "axis of evil" and threatening an attack on Saddam Hussein only make matters worse in the Middle East. The Egyptian media are saturated with reports on the daily bloodshed in Israel and the Israeli-occupied territories that describe Palestinian suicide attackers as "martyrs" and their acts as "sacrifices."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 22, 2002
BEIJING - Taking advantage of a rare opportunity to speak directly to this nation of 1.3 billion people, President Bush tried to convince ordinary Chinese today that the United States wants their country to flourish and that America is a kind, big-hearted nation, not a callous, international bully as it is sometimes perceived here. Speaking live on Chinese Central TV, the state-run national network, Bush also tried to gently address China's poor human rights record and authoritarian system, saying that political and religious freedom does not weaken societies but strengthens them.
BUSINESS
By TOM PETERS and TOM PETERS,TPG COMMUNICATIONS | February 3, 1992
The United States was invented against authority (the British crown). Lambasting government is our most noble heritage. Heaven knows, government provides us with lots of opportunities!But governance (political, religious, corporate) is one slippery task. At its core, it demands an analysis of the nature of man -- inherently evil and in need of constant policing, or inherently good, thence best left alone? My distinctly illiberal training in engineering hardly qualifies me to say. Kant, Hegel, Aquinas and Rousseau were notably absent from our curriculum.
NEWS
By Patricia Schroeder and Richard White | January 24, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Optimists see in the Internet new opportunities for citizens who are disengaged from the political process to become involved in issue advocacy politics, election politics and interactions with state governments and the federal government through new e-government initiatives. Yet the evolving story about the life of the Internet changed with Sept. 11, as did the evolving stories of everything else. The Internet was one of the tools the terrorists used to plan and execute the horrific acts of Sept.
NEWS
By Patricia Schroeder and Richard White | January 24, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Optimists see in the Internet new opportunities for citizens who are disengaged from the political process to become involved in issue advocacy politics, election politics and interactions with state governments and the federal government through new e-government initiatives. Yet the evolving story about the life of the Internet changed with Sept. 11, as did the evolving stories of everything else. The Internet was one of the tools the terrorists used to plan and execute the horrific acts of Sept.
NEWS
By David M. Anderson | December 28, 2001
WASHINGTON -- If you say that Americans are seriously opposed to the idea of sacrificing civil and political liberties for other values, then you are saying something that is true. But if you say that Americans are seriously opposed to the idea of sacrificing freedom for other values, then you are saying something that is false. For 100 years, the American political system has restricted the economic freedom of individuals and corporations in order to promote values ranging from equality to public safety.
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