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ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2004
What has become rewarded in political discourse is the extremity of viewpoint. People like the conflict. Conflict baby! It sells. Crossfire! Hardball! Shut up! You shut up! -- Jon Stewart of The Daily Show
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 16, 2012
As the dust settles in the wake of the latest presidential election, where can the open-minded voter turn these days for reasonably unbiased analysis and commentary on the state of political affairs? It's a challenge in this era of talk radio and cable chatter in which committed partisan political operatives, with an occasional allegedly nonpartisan journalist thrown in for cover, are given free rein to spread their slanted pitches and propaganda. The problem was emphatically illustrated in the appearance of conservative Republican guru Karl Rove on Fox News on election night, disputing the network's call on President Barack Obama's carrying the state of Ohio.
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NEWS
September 16, 2004
WHAT'S WRONG with the following conversation? "I want freedom to dream." "You protest too much." "It's the truth." What's wrong is that it contains certain keywords -- freedom, protest, truth -- that China's Internet nannies are trying to block in transmissions via the nation's most widely used instant-messaging service. Hackers recently obtained a copy of the government filtering program covertly installed on Chinese users' computers when they sign up for the IM service; it also blocks keywords in e-mail and phone text messages from those computers.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts | July 29, 2012
It was in 2008, the debate between vice-presidential candidates Joe Biden and Sarah Palin. Mr. Biden had just scored his opponent for failing to directly answer a question from moderator Gwen Ifill. But Ms. Palin was hardly apologetic. "I may not answer the questions the way that either the moderator or you want to hear," she snapped, "but I'm going to talk straight to the American people and let them know my track record also. " In other words, she felt no particular obligation to answer the questions she was asked.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 24, 1999
JAKARTA, Indonesia -- Having anointed its new leaders this week, Indonesia now finds itself facing the even more daunting task of redefining and reconstructing a nation whose institutions, politics, economy and sense of purpose had been bankrupted by the long rule of former President Suharto.On Wednesday the national assembly elected a new president, Abdurrahman Wahid, ending the 17-month transitional leadership of B. J. Habibie, who took the first steps to liberate political discourse, freeing the press and setting in motion a freewheeling electoral process.
NEWS
By Aaron Kraus | August 23, 2004
MANY POINT TO members of my generation and ridicule us for our political apathy. To a degree, they're right. We are obsessed with money. Music videos on MTV reinforce this image, one in which all value is placed on wealth and conspicuous consumption. But there are more fundamental reasons why activism and political discourse seem to be lacking in my generation. A sentence from the 1962 Port Huron Statement of the Students for a Democratic Society puts it best: "But apathy is not simply an attitude; it is a product of social institutions, and of the structure and organization of higher education itself."
NEWS
By Michael Kinsley | July 6, 1994
Washington -- IT SEEMS the self-proclaimed Christian right followers can dish it out, but they can't take it.They have called President Clinton every name in the book.The Rev. Jerry Falwell is selling videotapes that -- without a shred of evidence -- accuse the president of murdering political opponents back in Arkansas.The Christian Coalition has said Mr. Clinton's inauguration was "a repudiation of our forefathers' covenant with God."They have strayed far from traditional religious issues to proclaim the "Christian" position on matters like health care reform.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
During this fall's polarized presidential election season, Howard County police staked out a 4-foot-by-8-foot Bush-Cheney sign on U.S. 40 after similar placards had been vandalized. Within an hour, they arrested an Ellicott City man for striking down the sign and cutting holes in it. Cory Robert Cooke, 33, who told police he was tired of seeing the huge sign, pleaded guilty yesterday in Howard District Court to malicious destruction of property valued at less than $500. His arrest, one of three in Howard for defacing political signs, came during a rash of such incidents in the county before last month's election.
NEWS
By Douglas Coupland | September 21, 1993
Vancouver, British Columbia -- MY FATHER is that most ambiguous of figures in the current U.S. political discourse -- a Canadian physician.Depending on one's political perspective, he may be envisioned either as Marcus Welby brushing a tobacco mote from a glen-plaid jacket or as Lenin's zombie reincarnate, calculating the demise of MetLife amid the Alps of British Columbia.Neither perception is, of course, true.Dad, 60-something, is Dad. He is a general practitioner of the old school, mending broken femurs, delivering triplets and dealing with neighbors whose thumbs have been slammed in door jambs and swollen to the size of golf balls.
NEWS
By Stephen Vicchio | December 10, 1990
Testimony is like an arrow shot from a long bow; its force depends on the strength of the hand that draws it. But argument is like an arrow from a cross bow, which has equal force no matter who draws it. - Robert BoyleLately I have had a number of rather heated political conversations with myself in the privacy of my own head. Sometimes I talk outloud to find out what it is I am thinking. It's like a small boy turning his pockets inside out to see exactly what is in them. One begins to find all sorts of musings - personal property that somehow remained unaccounted for in the general neural inventory.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | November 3, 2010
I like the whole ritual of voting. I get attached to "my" polling place, whether it's a school, a firehouse or, as when I lived in Fort Lauderdale, the International Swimming Hall of Fame. (You may have your own idea about what patriotism smells like — maybe a barbecue on the Fourth of July, or even napalm in the morning — but for me it'll always be the scent of chlorine.) I like the cheery efficiency of the poll workers. I like chatting with neighbors I know and trying to place the ones I don't.
NEWS
April 7, 2010
Tim Eastman ( "The unruly mob comes to the editorial page," April 6) got it only half right. If he wants to see an unruly mob, he should peek in on a comments section on a sports related topic. And if the author of that piece happens to touch a nerve with the sports community, he'd better have a strong stomach because he will witness the most intense wailing and gnashing of teeth to be seen anywhere this side of Hades. I wrote an opinion that was published in this section on April 6 that the Sunpaper (not me)
NEWS
October 14, 2008
The war in Iraq hasn't been a topic of conversation in many American homes for some time now. For most, a crippled economy, declining home values, job security and shrinking retirement savings are the more urgent concerns of the day. There are few reasons to talk about the Iraq conflict except to perhaps wager a guess on which of the two presidential candidates would best resolve the U.S. involvement there. But the deployment of U.S. soldiers, reservists and national guardsmen to Iraq or Afghanistan remains steady, as 50 families gathered this weekend in Glen Burnie know all too well.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 10, 2008
I haven't read Robert Novak's column in 10 years. Back in 1998, he made a comment on CNN - what it was is not material here - that I considered beyond the pale. I decided I could henceforth do without his opinions and insights. He impressed me as a distinctly disagreeable man. And that was well before he outed CIA operative Valerie Plame. When the news broke recently that Mr. Novak had a brain tumor and would retire, I was not made prostrate by grief. What I felt was that whisper of common mortality, that sense of there-but-for-the-grace-of-God one usually feels when tragedy strikes someone who is known to you, but not too closely.
NEWS
September 13, 2005
New housing adds to rebirth of Allegany Co. Here's a suggestion for Dan Rodricks, the presumably well-meaning columnist who recently recommended the state should attempt to block one of the first steps in Allegany County's long-awaited growth. Please, get out here and do some homework before you presume to understand our needs and opportunities ("Builder's plan sprawls beyond good reason," Sept. 5). Allegany County has become one of Maryland's most desirable places to live, work and visit.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | December 2, 2004
During this fall's polarized presidential election season, Howard County police staked out a 4-foot-by-8-foot Bush-Cheney sign on U.S. 40 after similar placards had been vandalized. Within an hour, they arrested an Ellicott City man for striking down the sign and cutting holes in it. Cory Robert Cooke, 33, who told police he was tired of seeing the huge sign, pleaded guilty yesterday in Howard District Court to malicious destruction of property valued at less than $500. His arrest, one of three in Howard for defacing political signs, came during a rash of such incidents in the county before last month's election.
NEWS
By Lani Guinier | January 3, 1995
We are a nation deeply divided. Healing these divisions requires honest and open talk something our political system seems increasingly incapable of providing.It now seems that the ugly political season of 1994 may never end, as Republicans and new Democrats hover like vultures around the recently interred body of the old New Deal coalition. Already, politicians are climbing over political rivals, seeking to pre-empt each other's bids for their party's presidentia l nomination.This political maneuvering serves mean ambition, not the public good, and shows how governance itself has become a seamless election contest.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | August 10, 2008
I haven't read Robert Novak's column in 10 years. Back in 1998, he made a comment on CNN - what it was is not material here - that I considered beyond the pale. I decided I could henceforth do without his opinions and insights. He impressed me as a distinctly disagreeable man. And that was well before he outed CIA operative Valerie Plame. When the news broke recently that Mr. Novak had a brain tumor and would retire, I was not made prostrate by grief. What I felt was that whisper of common mortality, that sense of there-but-for-the-grace-of-God one usually feels when tragedy strikes someone who is known to you, but not too closely.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2004
What has become rewarded in political discourse is the extremity of viewpoint. People like the conflict. Conflict baby! It sells. Crossfire! Hardball! Shut up! You shut up! -- Jon Stewart of The Daily Show
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2004
The mainstream electronic media, still bruised from making bad calls in the 2000 election, ceded the dirty work to the new kid yesterday, allowing Internet news sites and Web logs to rule political reporting for much of the day - for better or worse. By early afternoon, online bloggers had started listing early, and sometimes questionable, exit poll information that showed Kerry leading Bush in the three key swing states of Ohio, Pennsylvania and Florida. And by early evening, before most polls closed and the networks resumed reporting, a few blogs and news Web sites were calling the race for Kerry.
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