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Political Corruption

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NEWS
May 29, 2012
In his recent commentary, "Too many Md. politicians have chalk on the shoes" (May 25), Douglas Schmidt gets points for originality for inventing a standard he can use to smear people who have committed no crime. However, he uses it mostly to smear innocent Democrats while not mentioning GOP officials who have done the same things. He neglected to mention that GOP candidate Ellen Sauerbrey not only maxed out donations from the Maryland Jockey Club to push for slots, but received donations from a scheme in which it traded contributions with a maxed-out contributor to New York Gov. George Pataki.
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NEWS
June 17, 2014
The Sun's endorsement of Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown in the Democratic gubernatorial primary elicits major concerns among the students of the Ralph Jaffe for governor movement to get rid of corruption in Maryland politics ( "Brown for governor," June 14). You minimized Mr. Brown's role in the disastrous health insurance exchange launch and even passed the buck to Gov. Martin O'Malley. What is most alarming is your assertion that Mr. Brown "inherits the legacy of his eight-year partnership with Governor O'Malley.
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NEWS
December 6, 2012
Will Rogers once observed that a newspaper ad was worth about 40 editorials, which many of us in the opinion writing side of that equation suspect would be quite the bargain. Little else could explain the public's indifference to a topic that has launched countless editorials in recent years - the prosecution of political corruption in this state and the need for reform. So it provides some relief to hear someone in the public eye "gets it" and, like those ink-stained wretches banging out opinions from here to Salisbury, Rockville or Cumberland, recognizes that Maryland's reputation in the political arena is something less than sterling.
NEWS
December 6, 2012
Will Rogers once observed that a newspaper ad was worth about 40 editorials, which many of us in the opinion writing side of that equation suspect would be quite the bargain. Little else could explain the public's indifference to a topic that has launched countless editorials in recent years - the prosecution of political corruption in this state and the need for reform. So it provides some relief to hear someone in the public eye "gets it" and, like those ink-stained wretches banging out opinions from here to Salisbury, Rockville or Cumberland, recognizes that Maryland's reputation in the political arena is something less than sterling.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2010
Gov. Martin O'Malley has named Emmet C. Davitt, an attorney who represents the state's utility regulatory body, to be the state's next political corruption watchdog. Davitt, 53, will replace Robert A. Rohrbaugh, an appointee of former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. Rohrbaugh announced earlier this year that he would not seek reappointment. Davitt said Friday he will start work "in a few weeks" and thanked O'Malley for his "trust and confidence. " He declined to talk about his prosecutorial philosophy or any changes he anticipates in the office.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Michael Dresser and Greg Garland and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2005
A federal investigation criticized by Democrats for its election-year timing in 2002 officially ended yesterday when prosecutors dropped charges against a former state agency head accused of misusing grant funds - allegations that tarnished Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend at a critical point in her campaign for governor. U.S. District Judge Andre M. Davis dismissed the indictment against Stephen P. Amos, former director of the Governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention, at the request of interim U.S. Attorney Allen F. Loucks.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,SUN STAFF | October 14, 1997
At a time when even his critics might think he's suffered enough, the torment of Marvin Mandel continues.Almost exactly 20 years after his conviction in 1977 on charges of political corruption, the former two-term governor of Maryland watches helplessly as his wife, Jeanne -- his fiercest and most faithful defender during two long trials and nearly two years of incarceration -- struggles with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, a fatal neuromuscular disorder also...
NEWS
September 22, 1999
Arnold Feuerman,81, an inventor and former chairman of Arnold Automotive Group, one of the nation's largest auto dealers, died Friday in Bloomfield Hills, Mich., of liver cancer.Willi Millowitsch,90, one of Germany's best-known comic actors and a fixture at the Cologne carnival, died Monday in Cologne.Fred Roti,78, a former Chicago alderman who was convicted of political corruption, died of lung cancer Monday in Chicago.
FEATURES
By Craig Timberg and Jonathan Weisman and Craig Timberg and Jonathan Weisman,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Rafael Alvarez and research librarians Sandy Levy and Dee Lyon contributed to this article | January 14, 1998
Maryland's often-felonious political history includes several cases of legislators automatically ejected for criminal behavior. There have also been others, like Robert Swailes, expelled without an accompanying criminal conviction:In 1775, just as the American Revolutionary War was beginning, Francis Baker, a Talbot County legislator, lost his seat when the assembly expelled him for violating an informal prohibition against trading with the British.During...
FEATURES
By Carina Chocano and Carina Chocano,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 14, 2007
Paul Schrader's straight-faced Beltway potboiler The Walker begins as a simmering piece about D.C. gossip and petty scandals, then overflows into an indictment of all things Washington. Not content to be a cautionary melodrama about the real housewives of the District of Columbia, however, it fans out to encompass corporate bribery, political corruption and the war on terror. Schrader has said the idea began as he wondered what might have happened to the Julian Kaye character of American Gigolo in midlife, but as the political climate became more and more conservative he felt the urge to make the movie more and more political.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 19, 2012
At the 40th anniversary of the Watergate break-in of the Democratic National Committee headquarters, an act that eventually led to the resignation of President Richard M. Nixon, the chief lesson seems hopelessly lost. The lesson was this: Of all the corrupting influences in politics, beyond the anything-goes mentality that can drive participants to excess in their quest to win, none takes a back seat to unlimited and unaccountable money. When the Nixon political apparatus got caught red-handed illegally entering the DNC offices on the night of June 17, 1972, one of the first responses, as Nixon himself said, was to find the funds that could buy the silence of the apprehended burglars.
NEWS
May 29, 2012
In his recent commentary, "Too many Md. politicians have chalk on the shoes" (May 25), Douglas Schmidt gets points for originality for inventing a standard he can use to smear people who have committed no crime. However, he uses it mostly to smear innocent Democrats while not mentioning GOP officials who have done the same things. He neglected to mention that GOP candidate Ellen Sauerbrey not only maxed out donations from the Maryland Jockey Club to push for slots, but received donations from a scheme in which it traded contributions with a maxed-out contributor to New York Gov. George Pataki.
NEWS
By Douglas M. Schmidt | May 24, 2012
For the past three years, Maryland has experienced an unprecedented crime wave of political corruption. The only comparable period in memory would be the 1970s, when a governor was jailed and a sitting U.S. vice president (who had served as governor and Baltimore County executive) resigned in shame. The current offenders have been high-ranking elected officials, and the offenses have been far more serious than simple lapses in judgment. They have involved a level of hubris and ethical depravity that are shocking by any standard.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2012
William N. Jackson, a decorated World War II veteran and retired Internal Revenue Service group supervisor who assisted in the criminal investigation of 1970s political corruption cases, died at Sinai Hospital on Sunday after falling at his home. He was 86 and lived in North Baltimore. Born at his parents' Montford Avenue home in Baltimore, he was a 1944 graduate of Patterson Park High School. Family members said he was drafted into the Army that summer and sailed to Europe in early 1945.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2011
Former Prince George's County Executive Jack Johnson was sentenced Tuesday to more than seven years in federal prison after admitting to a wide-ranging pattern of corruption that permeated virtually every level of county government from health to housing and law enforcement to liquor laws. Johnson, a 62-year-old Democrat, was arrested on extortion, bribery and evidence tampering charges in November 2010 while serving out the final weeks of his eight years as the leader of Maryland's second-most populous county.
NEWS
December 25, 2010
The year wasn't a week old when Mayor Sheila Dixon announced, on Jan. 6, that she was resigning as part of a plea deal to end a corruption investigation. Her exit a month later catapulted City Council President Stephanie Rawlings-Blake into the hot seat as Baltimore's 49th chief executive. The new mayor's pledge: To "build a better, safer, stronger Baltimore. " But first, she had to help the city dig itself out. Back-to-back blizzards dumped several feet of snow, briefly turning Baltimore into Syracuse-on-the- Patapsco.
NEWS
June 16, 2005
James I. Keane, a lawyer and former assistant Maryland attorney general, died of complications from lung cancer Friday at Inova Fairfax Hospital in Fairfax, Va. The former Dickeyville resident was 60. Born in Cheverly, he earned a bachelor's degree in history at Marquette University in Milwaukee and received his legal education at the Georgetown University Law Center. From 1968 to 1969, he was a law clerk for Judge J. Dudley Digges of the Maryland Court of Appeals. In 1972, he was appointed a Maryland assistant attorney general and worked on political corruption cases, including the bribery investigation of then-Vice President Spiro T. Agnew stemming from his years as Baltimore County executive.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2010
Gov. Martin O'Malley has named Emmet C. Davitt, an attorney who represents the state's utility regulatory body, to be the state's next political corruption watchdog. Davitt, 53, will replace Robert A. Rohrbaugh, an appointee of former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. Rohrbaugh announced earlier this year that he would not seek reappointment. Davitt said Friday he will start work "in a few weeks" and thanked O'Malley for his "trust and confidence. " He declined to talk about his prosecutorial philosophy or any changes he anticipates in the office.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2010
The state's political corruption prosecutor will not step down in September as planned, but will instead remain in office until a replacement is named. In a harshly worded letter written this month, State Prosecutor Robert A. Rohrbaugh said he was "disappointed" that Gov. Martin O'Malley had not moved more swiftly to convene a commission required by state law to help select his successor. Rohrbaugh posted the letter on his website Monday morning. "It is important that this state have an independent prosecutor who is not an elected politician," Rohrbaugh wrote.
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