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October 6, 1996
THE PALTRY turnout for an African-American political convention that Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan promoted as the next step after the Million Man March was in a way more evidence of the power of that earlier event.Thousands of African-Americans who participated in the 1995 rally in Washington said the experience was spiritual and personal. They praised Mr. Farrakhan for staging it, but insisted the march was not about him. Sure enough, only a few hundred registered for the black political convention last weekend in St. Louis, an event that Mr. Farrakhan's surrogates had predicted 30,000 would attend.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
With the presidential convention season upon us, political and campaign junkies will most likely find Stan Haynes' recently published book, "The First American Political Conventions: Transforming Presidential Nominations, 1832-1872," a fascinating and entertaining look at the way these quadrennial gatherings used to be — before primaries and caucuses took all the drama and fun out of them. The years covered by Haynes, a Semmes, Bowen & Semmes attorney and Ellicott City resident, marked a critical time in the nation, with issues that included the Panic of 1837, slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction.
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NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2003
It has been 30 years since Anne Arundel County's African-American leaders held a political convention. It's been 13 years since a black from Anne Arundel was elected to the General Assembly or to the County Council. And it's been more than six months since the Rev. Walter E. Middlebrooks concluded that the county's black community has no organized agenda. Others agreed. Yesterday, he and a handful of black leaders held a news conference to announce that they intend to change that situation.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | July 12, 2012
It's been years since Baltimore hosted a political convention, but almost under the radar one's happening here this week. Members of the Green Party of the United States are gathering downtown starting today, opening a three-day convention to pick a presidential candidate. Jill Stein, a physician and environmental health advocate from Massachusetts is the frontrunner, with 138 of the 184 delegates assigned so far. Comedian and actress Roseanne Barr, who's been active in politics over the past decade, is running second.
NEWS
July 31, 2000
THE BALL club is in the cellar, stars unloaded. Its most recent publicity was for cops beating a guy on the ground. A dock restaurant fell into the river. A neighborhood is actually sinking. Philadelphia is on display when the nation's eyes are on a political convention so scripted, devoid of happening and under control that those eyes will inevitably stray to the periphery. They will see a burgeoning downtown, tremendous investment in arts facilities, convention center, bubbling new restaurant and nightlife around the 18th-century tourist sites.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | July 12, 2012
It's been years since Baltimore hosted a political convention, but almost under the radar one's happening here this week. Members of the Green Party of the United States are gathering downtown starting today, opening a three-day convention to pick a presidential candidate. Jill Stein, a physician and environmental health advocate from Massachusetts is the frontrunner, with 138 of the 184 delegates assigned so far. Comedian and actress Roseanne Barr, who's been active in politics over the past decade, is running second.
NEWS
By John R. Leopold | August 25, 1996
It was theater with funny hats and red, white and blue balloons.It was shaking hands with Bob Dole as he made his way to the podium to accept his nomination and reaffirm a career of pragmatic compromise.It was schmoozing with Henry Kissinger, Marilyn Quayle, Steve Forbes, Jack Germond, Ollie North, Norman Mailer and Merv Griffin.It was summer camp for political junkies.It was the culmination of the Great American Road Show, the arduous primary election campaign that ends with the coronation of the party's nominees for president and vice president of the United States.
NEWS
By JOHN LEOPOLD | August 30, 1992
It was theater with funny hats and big red, white and blue balloons. It was summer camp for political junkies. It was the culmination of the Great American Road Show, the arduous primary election campaign that ends with the coronation of the party's nominees for president and vice president of the United States.Although this was the fifth convention I've attended as an elected delegate, it was as exciting and exhilarating as any of the others.When you walk out on the floor of a national political convention, you know you are on a stage with an international audience.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In paying tribute to former Republican National Committee Chairman Lee Atwater yesterday, Secretary of State James A. Baker III said he could picture the rough-and-tumble political operative who died last Friday at age 40, "halo askew, strumming a guitar instead of a harp . . . getting things ready for the big convention in the sky."And, in fact, yesterday's memorial service at the National Cathedral resembled a political convention itself, as President and Mrs. Bush joined about 2,000 government officials, former colleagues -- some wearing their RNC pins -- and even one-time political foes to mourn Mr. Atwater, who had been battling a brain tumor for a year.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | August 28, 2008
DENVER - Free speech at the Democratic National Convention this week is where you find it. Near Market Street, maybe, not far from the Pepsi Center, where delegates hear party pronouncements in well-scripted speeches. Here, a nicely dressed man reads aloud feverishly from the Bible, as if the end were near. No one seems to be listening. On the opposite corner stands a woman calling herself Nuclia Waste, representing a magazine called 5,280. (A mile-high periodical - get it?) She draws a few curiosity seekers.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | August 28, 2008
DENVER - Free speech at the Democratic National Convention this week is where you find it. Near Market Street, maybe, not far from the Pepsi Center, where delegates hear party pronouncements in well-scripted speeches. Here, a nicely dressed man reads aloud feverishly from the Bible, as if the end were near. No one seems to be listening. On the opposite corner stands a woman calling herself Nuclia Waste, representing a magazine called 5,280. (A mile-high periodical - get it?) She draws a few curiosity seekers.
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER and ANDREW RATNER,andrew.ratner@baltsun.com | August 26, 2008
Several hundred bloggers will cast a much larger shadow at the political conventions the next two weeks than they did four years ago when all the convention bloggers could have fit in an elevator. Whether their presence shakes up all the careful choreography remains to be seen, but the names of many of the blogs indicate this is not your father's political media. They range from the sarcastic to the shameless, from UppityWisconsin to crooksandliars.com to Connecticut's MyLeftNutmeg.com.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 13, 2008
The city should build a new arena in downtown Baltimore - probably on the site of the present one - and it should be large enough to accommodate an NHL or NBA franchise, major concerts and conventions. The men and women looking into this should take a serum against small-think and never-think. Baltimore deserves an arena that serves a future of big possibilities. I don't know if any member of the Baltimore Development Corp.'s arena advisory panel is under 35 years of age, but if not, it would be a good idea to add one or two who are - some young, future-minded, civic-minded sharpies who care about the emerging Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2004
Though he has been dead and gone for 48 years, H.L. Mencken's trenchant observations on attending national political conventions was recalled earlier this week in a New York Times column by R. W. Apple Jr. The Houston Chronicle, Agence France-Presse and the Australian Financial Review also conjured up the Sage of Baltimore's convention reportage during the past week. Mencken was 23 years old when he covered his first conventions in 1904, when the Baltimore Herald sent him to the Republican convention in Chicago and the Democratic gathering in St. Louis.
FEATURES
By Gerald P. Merrell and David Folkenflik and Gerald P. Merrell and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2004
Before it was canceled, Walker, Texas Ranger was a mediocre television show that often hovered in the bottom half of the ratings. When the last round of political conventions befell us in 2000, though, the CBS action show still outdrew the network's coverage of the Republican coronation of George W. Bush nearly 2-1. Four years later, ratings like that suggest the biggest question confronting the Democrats this week in Boston and the GOP next month in...
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2004
It takes a lot of work to nominate a presidential candidate. Victor Modic can attest to that. The co-owner of Ice Art, an ice-carving company in Cedar Grove, N.J., is working long hours to plan nearly 50 sculptures for the Republican National Convention, including the kind with liquor sluicing down an ice luge. "We'll probably do it with a large martini glass," Modic says, "and a spigot in the center." This, in the name of democracy: your convention delegates guzzling booze off a giant ice cube.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 13, 2008
The city should build a new arena in downtown Baltimore - probably on the site of the present one - and it should be large enough to accommodate an NHL or NBA franchise, major concerts and conventions. The men and women looking into this should take a serum against small-think and never-think. Baltimore deserves an arena that serves a future of big possibilities. I don't know if any member of the Baltimore Development Corp.'s arena advisory panel is under 35 years of age, but if not, it would be a good idea to add one or two who are - some young, future-minded, civic-minded sharpies who care about the emerging Baltimore.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Ryan Davis,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2003
It has been 30 years since Anne Arundel County's African-American leaders held a political convention. It's been 13 years since a black from Anne Arundel was elected to the General Assembly or to the County Council. And it's been more than six months since the Rev. Walter E. Middlebrooks concluded that the county's black community has no organized agenda. Others agreed. Yesterday, he and a handful of black leaders held a news conference to announce that they intend to change that situation.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jules Witcover,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 18, 2000
LOS ANGELES - The Democrats are heading home today, hoping that their national convention has breathed new life into the prospects for their nominee, Vice President Al Gore. The prognosis for the institution of the political convention itself, though, is not so promising after another four-day exercise in predictability and orchestration like the one the Republicans held in Philadelphia. Taken together, the two conventions fueled the argument of those who say the institution should go the way of the dinosaur.
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