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By GEORGE WILL | October 10, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Senate this week revisits campaign finance reform, making another attempt to broaden regulation, by the political class, of public communication about that class. So consider remarks Rep. Lois Capps, a California Democrat, made during debate on the House version of speech regulation, the Shays-Meehan bill.Her husband, a congressman, died in October 1997. In January 1998, she finished first in an all-party primary, and in March she won a runoff to complete the remainder of her husband's term.
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NEWS
By Gregory Rodriguez | February 19, 2013
In 2006, the last time Congress took a serious look at comprehensive immigration reform, hundreds of thousands of immigrants, legal and illegal, marched through the streets of the nation's cities. The resulting media coverage was filled with stories about real people - brown people! - whose lives would be affected by the proposed legislation. It was one of those rare moments when the public could witness the intersection of grass-roots movements, insider political maneuvering and their human consequences.
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NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | July 12, 1993
Washington. -- These are salad days for those conservatives whose philosophy is confirmed by, and whose agenda is advanced by, bad behavior of government.Recently, for example, the House of Representatives, home of the most entrenched portion of the political class, voted to continue spending taxpayers' dollars to subsidize, for large corporations and wealthy trade associations, the overseas marketing of fruit juice and candy bars, whiskey and prunes and many other profitable commodities.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | November 7, 2010
I would gladly join a tea party group as long as it accepted Barack Obama as the president of the United States, kept its distance from the Republican Party, Fox News and the Democratic Party, and as long as it opposed more tax breaks for the wealthy, fought for better wages and health care benefits for working-class Americans and conceded that the financial system that caused the biggest economic collapse since the Great Depression needs regulation....
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | June 2, 1994
Washington. -- This city now needs what physicists call a ''unified field theory,'' an enveloping explanation of all phenomena, large and small. Here goes.After acrimonious debate, senators recently voted 53-44 against doing away with their special parking privileges at National Airport. Baggage-laden commoners, trudging from their distant parking places, past the VIP lot next to the terminal, are known to mutter imprecations against the political class.Five days after that vote, the sign on the VIP lot that read ''Reserved Parking/Supreme Court Justices/Members of Congress/Diplomatic Corps'' was replaced with one that says ''Restricted Parking/Authorized Users Only.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | June 24, 1993
Washington. -- Speaker Tom Foley, D-Wash., who was elected to Congress in 1964 when an Oldsmobile cost $3,495, is suing the people of his state for their impertinence last November when they voted to impose term limits on the states' U.S. senators and representatives. His maneuver is a suitable place to start an update on the up-and-coming term-limits movement.In all 14 states where the political class could not prevent people from voting on term limits in November, limits passed, getting more votes in the 14 states than Ross Perot got in 50 states.
NEWS
By George F. Will | September 29, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Almost nothing that preoccupies Washington is as important as Washington thinks almost all its preoccupations are. But now Congress is considering some version of the McCain-Feingold bill, which raises "regime-level" questions.It would continue the change for the worse of American governance. And Washington's political class hopes the bill's real importance will be underestimated.With a moralism disproportionate to the merits of their cause, members of that class -- including the exhorting, collaborative media -- are mounting an unprecedentedly sweeping attack on freedom of expression.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | July 8, 1993
Washington. -- We need a new taxonomy of politics. A ruling by a federal district judge proves that anarchy, usually defined as the absence of government, can be approximated by a glut of the kind of government produced by liberal legislation and judicial activism.A federal law requires the government to file environmental-impact statements for all ''proposals for legislation and other major federal actions significantly affecting the quality of the human environment.'' ''Human'' encompasses spotted owls.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | January 25, 1993
Washington.--In the soothing ointment of President Clinton's words on Wednesday, one element was especially welcome to people who worry about the political giddiness encouraged, inevitably, by the civic liturgy of an inauguration. The element was the emphasis placed by Mr. Clinton, who as candidate stressed ''change'' propelled by government, on the autonomy of change: ''Profound and powerful forces are shaking and remaking our world. . . . ''The forces to which he was referring -- forces of communication, commerce, science, intellectual and religious conviction -- are always doing that.
NEWS
By George F. Will | June 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The electoral rout of the French right actually serves conservatism. It gives Socialists another opportunity to demonstrate the delusional nature of their policies, and to toss fistfuls of gravel into the gears of the machinery driving Europe toward an anti-democratic unity. Europe's political class has arrogantly fostered unification over the heads of increasingly unpersuaded peoples.President Chirac called early parliamentary elections to get a mandate for overdue austerities.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | August 5, 2010
The Great Recession has caused a seismic shift in how ordinary Americans view their government. Perhaps you saw the story this week about an Arizona sheriff who, in speaking about the Justice Department suit against his state's new immigration law, said, "Our own government has become our enemy and is taking us to court at a time when we need help." Pinal County Sheriff Paul Babeu elaborated in an interview with CNSNews.com, saying, "What's very troubling at a time when we in law enforcement and our state need help from the federal government, instead of sending help they put up billboard-size signs warning our citizens to stay out of the desert in my county because of dangerous drug and human smuggling and weapons and bandits and all these other things and then, behind that, they drag us into court with the ACLU."
NEWS
By Stephen Johnson | March 3, 2004
WASHINGTON - In the last century, the United States mounted two major interventions in Haiti, both expensive failures. Before sending thousands of troops on another dubious errand, Congress and the White House would do well to ponder some lessons learned. The first is don't do everything yourself. In 1915, President Woodrow Wilson sent U.S. Marines to put down an uprising. They stayed for 19 years and largely ran the government. They paid off Haiti's debts, paved streets and developed Haiti's public health infrastructure.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2002
City Councilwoman Lisa Joi Stancil says that when she was a teen-ager she always tried to stay ahead of her peers. So she frequently asked her father - an attorney - to teach her the law. "I've always been that way," said the 39-year-old lawyer, explaining why she now wants to be the city's top prosecutor despite not having a wealth of experience in the field. Stancil has never taken a case before a jury. "I don't think it matters how many murder trials you've done," Stancil said. "Not having done a murder trial doesn't mean I can't make sure the prosecutors handling the cases don't dot their i's and cross their t's."
NEWS
By George F. Will | October 17, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The media are missing a scandal because the media are the scandal. They are complicit with the portion of the political class currently attempting to impose on the public, in the name of campaign finance reform, speech restrictions of the sort from which the media are immune.But the rationale for this immunity, as explained by the Supreme Court in the First Amendment case most cherished by the media, refutes the argument for the campaign reforms most of the media favor.The Senate is currently debating the McCain-Feingold bill to ban "soft money" contributions to political parties.
NEWS
By GEORGE WILL | October 10, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The Senate this week revisits campaign finance reform, making another attempt to broaden regulation, by the political class, of public communication about that class. So consider remarks Rep. Lois Capps, a California Democrat, made during debate on the House version of speech regulation, the Shays-Meehan bill.Her husband, a congressman, died in October 1997. In January 1998, she finished first in an all-party primary, and in March she won a runoff to complete the remainder of her husband's term.
NEWS
By George F. Will | June 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- In the 1936 campaign, after four years of increased federal spending, President Franklin D. Roosevelt was to campaign in Pittsburgh, where in the 1932 campaign he had called for reduced federal spending. FDR directed his speech writer, Samuel Rosenman, to "see whether you can prepare a draft giving a good and convincing explanation" of his somersault. Rosenman read the 1932 speech and told FDR only one explanation would do: "The only thing you can say about that 1932 speech is to deny categorically that you ever made it."
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2002
City Councilwoman Lisa Joi Stancil says that when she was a teen-ager she always tried to stay ahead of her peers. So she frequently asked her father - an attorney - to teach her the law. "I've always been that way," said the 39-year-old lawyer, explaining why she now wants to be the city's top prosecutor despite not having a wealth of experience in the field. Stancil has never taken a case before a jury. "I don't think it matters how many murder trials you've done," Stancil said. "Not having done a murder trial doesn't mean I can't make sure the prosecutors handling the cases don't dot their i's and cross their t's."
NEWS
By George F. Will | October 17, 1999
WASHINGTON -- The media are missing a scandal because the media are the scandal. They are complicit with the portion of the political class currently attempting to impose on the public, in the name of campaign finance reform, speech restrictions of the sort from which the media are immune.But the rationale for this immunity, as explained by the Supreme Court in the First Amendment case most cherished by the media, refutes the argument for the campaign reforms most of the media favor.The Senate is currently debating the McCain-Feingold bill to ban "soft money" contributions to political parties.
NEWS
By George F. Will | September 29, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Almost nothing that preoccupies Washington is as important as Washington thinks almost all its preoccupations are. But now Congress is considering some version of the McCain-Feingold bill, which raises "regime-level" questions.It would continue the change for the worse of American governance. And Washington's political class hopes the bill's real importance will be underestimated.With a moralism disproportionate to the merits of their cause, members of that class -- including the exhorting, collaborative media -- are mounting an unprecedentedly sweeping attack on freedom of expression.
NEWS
By George F. Will | June 5, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The electoral rout of the French right actually serves conservatism. It gives Socialists another opportunity to demonstrate the delusional nature of their policies, and to toss fistfuls of gravel into the gears of the machinery driving Europe toward an anti-democratic unity. Europe's political class has arrogantly fostered unification over the heads of increasingly unpersuaded peoples.President Chirac called early parliamentary elections to get a mandate for overdue austerities.
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