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By Theo Lippman Jr | November 26, 1996
MOMENTUM IS building for ''campaign- finance reform.'' Hold on to your wallets, taxpayers!The last time Congress ''reformed'' campaign finance, it trebled the amount of money that is taken out of the Treasury (your money) and given to presidential candidates. That was in 1992.The law allowing taxpayers to designate Treasury funds for candidates went into effect in 1972. A taxpayer could check off on his 1040 form a $1 contribution to the fund. This wasn't that taxpayer's $1. It was everybody's.
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NEWS
Richard E. Vatz and Lee S. Weinberg | July 24, 2014
There may be no more enigmatic concept in politics than negative campaigning. Virtually no one publicly supports it, almost every non-shoe-in political principal uses it, and almost no two people mean the same thing when they refer to it. Periodic hostile and ugly political campaigning goes back centuries in America. In the beginning of the 19th century, there was hatchet man James Thomson Callender's attacks on Thomas Jefferson, claiming the new president fathered children with slaves.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. saw its profit grow 33 percent in the third quarter as political campaigns and automakers ramped up spending on advertising, the Hunt Valley-based company said Thursday. The broadcaster earned $26.2 million in the three months that ended Sept. 30, or 32 cents per share, compared with $19.2 million during the same months last year, or 24 cents per share. Boosted by political and automotive advertising, sales from continuing operations jumped 49 percent to $226.4 million, from $151.9 million in the third quarter of 2011.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2014
How many votes does it take to win a primary for governor in Maryland? Considering this is a state of nearly 6 million people, not many. If turnout Tuesday is on par with the last gubernatorial primary four years ago, 180,000 votes could theoretically carry the day for the Democratic nomination. Just 75,000 would be enough to squeak by in the Republican field. That's less than 10 percent of registered voters in each party. "It's a really striking realization," said Laslo Boyd, a political columnist and consultant who has worked on political campaigns in Maryland.
NEWS
By Raymond Daniel Burke | September 28, 2010
As the general election season begins to swing into full gear, what passes these days for political debate and analysis is hardly inspiring. We can expect to spend the early fall constantly bombarded with platitudinous sound bites and spin intended to invoke some visceral reaction in a target group. It is mostly attention-grabbing drivel that does very little to promote a meaningful discussion about policies and governance. Much of it is now carried on in self-published blogs and social networking sites, where it has both unlimited access to the public forum and freedom from the scrutiny that used to be the function of a truly independent press.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | August 11, 2011
Joyce McCartney Ward, an activist in historic preservation causes who helped establish the Irish Shrine in Southwest Baltimore, died of cancer Aug. 4 at her Bolton Hill home. She was 81. Born in Baltimore City of Virginia parents, Harry and Lucille McCartney, she attended Garrison Junior High School alongside her future husband, Thomas Ward, who would later serve on the City Council and be elected to the Circuit Court for Baltimore City. She and Mr. Ward had been neighbors as children.
NEWS
Richard E. Vatz and Lee S. Weinberg | July 24, 2014
There may be no more enigmatic concept in politics than negative campaigning. Virtually no one publicly supports it, almost every non-shoe-in political principal uses it, and almost no two people mean the same thing when they refer to it. Periodic hostile and ugly political campaigning goes back centuries in America. In the beginning of the 19th century, there was hatchet man James Thomson Callender's attacks on Thomas Jefferson, claiming the new president fathered children with slaves.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | October 30, 2002
For a political candidate, Rick Kunkel has a high degree of self-awareness. You can tell by the way he prefaces his pronouncements about the issues of the day. "I don't want to sound kooky or radical, but ... " he says to introduce his support for universal health insurance. "I don't want to sound strident, but ... " he says as a wind-up to his denunciation of how big, special-interest money finds its way into political campaigns - although not into his. Even about his candidacy, Kunkel finds the need for a qualifying prologue.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | February 16, 1992
A fellow who needed money for an operation walked into the American Political Items Collectors (APIC) convention in Anaheim, Calif., last August with a couple of old campaign buttons to see what he could get for them. The convention was called to order over the public address system and, in keeping with an APIC tradition, the buttons were auctioned, right then and there. One was an extremely rare button picturing John W. Davis and his running mate, Charles Bryan, the 1924 Democratic candidates.
NEWS
September 11, 1997
An article Monday overstated the federal campaign contributions made by Hilary Rosen, CEO of the Recording Industry Association of America. She has donated more than $114,000 to political campaigns and organizations since 1987, according to records filed with the Federal Election Commission.The Sun regrets the errors.Pub Date: 9/11/97
NEWS
May 30, 2014
Thank you for your editorial on the questionable relationship between Caves Valley Partners and Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz ( "Kamenetz the kingmaker," May 22). Your editorial brought to light several important issues surrounding loopholes in campaign finance law in local politics. While the Boss Tweed/Tammany Hall atmosphere is disturbing, the core problem is not one of increased financial involvement of developers in Baltimore County political races, but in the overall arrogance of the Kamenetz administration toward the people of Baltimore County.
NEWS
April 4, 2014
In the world of John G. Roberts Jr., it appears the only true case of government corruption is the "American Hustle" style of handing over a pile of money to a congressman in some smoke-filled backroom deal. Yet here in the real world, we've come to understand that corruption is a subtler evil where money buys access and preference, resulting in gifts not necessarily tied up with a bow under a tree, but just as real and valuable. Forty years ago, Americans were outraged by this potential assault on democracy, and so were enough members of Congress to support bipartisan limits on campaign donations.
NEWS
October 7, 2013
Campaign finance limits are back before the U.S. Supreme Court this week, and that's probably bad news for those who like good government. Think what this country needs is to give more political clout to the wealthy and those who seek special favors from government? Well, your wish may soon be granted. Tomorrow, the justices will hear arguments in Shaun McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission that challenge aggregate limits on individual campaign donations. Under current law, a donor can't give more than $48,600 to federal candidates during the two-year election cycle and no more than $123,200 when contributions to political committees are added to the mix. Those caps date back to the post-Watergate philosophy that there's a public interest in preventing corruption and the appearance of corruption.
NEWS
April 28, 2013
The recent article about U.S. Sen. Barbara Mikulski's campaign fundraising ("Mikulski campaign funds hit bonanza," April 22) by John Fritze is disturbing to say the least because it seems to convey the following concepts. First, the more money a politician raises the more respect he or she should be given by the media and by his or her constituents, and second, the more seniority a politician accumulates, the more respect he or she should be given by the media and by his or her constituents.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 3, 2012
There was a time when a president and the opposition party in Congress could agree on certain basics, such as the right of the chief executive to select members of his cabinet with no fuss or bother. The president's most important choice in this regard was of his secretary of state, the first among supposed equals in the cabinet and once at the top of the ladder in terms of presidential succession after the vice president. That pecking order was changed by statute to elevate the speaker of the House and then the Senate president pro tem on the list, on the premise that anyone ascending to the presidency under the Constitution ought to have first been an elected official.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
Sinclair Broadcast Group Inc. saw its profit grow 33 percent in the third quarter as political campaigns and automakers ramped up spending on advertising, the Hunt Valley-based company said Thursday. The broadcaster earned $26.2 million in the three months that ended Sept. 30, or 32 cents per share, compared with $19.2 million during the same months last year, or 24 cents per share. Boosted by political and automotive advertising, sales from continuing operations jumped 49 percent to $226.4 million, from $151.9 million in the third quarter of 2011.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2009
WASHINGTON: Struggling newspapers should be allowed to operate as nonprofits similar to public broadcasting stations, Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin proposed Tuesday. He introduced a bill that would allow newspapers to choose tax-exempt status. They would no longer be able to make political endorsements, but could report on all issues, including political campaigns. Advertising and subscription revenue would be tax-exempt, and contributions to support coverage could be tax-deductible. The Maryland Democrat said the bill is aimed at preserving local newspapers, not large newspaper conglomerates.
NEWS
October 19, 2012
Once again, I have to agree with Susan Reimer - presidential debates are truly painful to watch ("No debate," Oct. 18). I watched the first 15 minutes of the first debate, 3-4 minutes of the vice presidential debates but chose not to watch the most recent debate. So-called reality TV is pretty pathetic, and the debates certainly come pretty close to being simply another reality TV program. I would however, extend my criticism to the whole campaign process, which seems to be endless.
NEWS
October 16, 2012
Sen. Brian Frosh's comment that the $40 million raised so far by gambling interests in Maryland for the casino referendum constitutes "wretched excess" is incredibly naive ("Record $40 million raised for and against gambling referendum," Oct. 13). The amount of spending merely underlines that funding for all political campaigns will continue to escalate commensurate with the expansion and intrusion of the government at the federal and state level, as will corruption and crony capitalism, I might add. It is the natural state of affairs, and it is a bipartisan phenomenon.
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