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NEWS
November 11, 1991
Pro-choice groups, including Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties Union, are entirely right in demanding that the U.S. Supreme Court give a definitive answer as swiftly as possible on the question of whether the controversial decision of Roe vs. Wade continues to be the law of the land.All that is needed to overturn Roe vs. Wade is for just one of three justices -- Sandra Day O'Connor, David Souter or Clarence Thomas -- to join the four justices who have already declared themselves in favor of reversal.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2013
Dr. Ben Carson says he didn't anticipate the reaction to what he considered his common-sense remarks as keynote speaker this month at the National Prayer Breakfast. But after video went viral of the trailblazing black neurosurgeon taking jabs at Barack Obama's health care overhaul a few feet from the president himself, some want the famed doctor at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore to parlay the attention into a new career: politics. "Here you have this guy who has been a celebrity minority for 30 years coming out and making the conservative case better than a lot of conservatives can," said Jonah Goldberg, editor-at-large for National Review Online.
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NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | September 14, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- Hoping to keep tax-restructuring recommendations out of the political arena until after the Nov. 6 general election, the chairman of the governor's commission on taxes has been meeting privately with individual commission members to devise what could become the final report.Moreover, a meeting of the Commission on State Taxes and Tax Structure that had been tentatively scheduled for next week for "consideration of final recommendations" was quietly canceled, and no future meetings are scheduled until Nov. 8.Timing that meeting two days after the election is no coincidence, admitted R. Robert Linowes, chairman of the 17-member commission created in October 1987 by Gov. William Donald Schaefer.
NEWS
By Laura Olson and Laura Olson,Tribune Washington Bureau | December 21, 2008
WASHINGTON - Across Shannon McGinley's hometown of Bedford, N.H., this fall, women were talking about politics. At school gatherings and Bible study groups, women who had never followed political affairs suddenly were talking about a woman like them - a conservative mother trying to balance family and career. It started when the Republican presidential nominee, Sen. John McCain of Arizona, selected Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin for his running mate. Now, more than a month since the political spotlight has turned away from the failed GOP ticket, some of those whom Palin attracted to the political arena are seeking ways to keep a conversation going.
NEWS
By Laura Olson and Laura Olson,Tribune Washington Bureau | December 21, 2008
WASHINGTON - Across Shannon McGinley's hometown of Bedford, N.H., this fall, women were talking about politics. At school gatherings and Bible study groups, women who had never followed political affairs suddenly were talking about a woman like them - a conservative mother trying to balance family and career. It started when the Republican presidential nominee, Sen. John McCain of Arizona, selected Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin for his running mate. Now, more than a month since the political spotlight has turned away from the failed GOP ticket, some of those whom Palin attracted to the political arena are seeking ways to keep a conversation going.
NEWS
December 15, 1993
DESPITE advance notice, including parking tips, we weren't able to be present in Towson Monday to hear Del. Gerry Brewster discuss his agenda for the 1994 General Assembly session and "answer questions regarding his political plans for 1994" -- a reference to Mr. Brewster's expected run for the congressional seat being vacated by Rep. Helen Delich Bentley.No matter. A press packet was on our desk by mid-afternoon Monday. It contained a copy of the delegate's remarks informing us that "an announcement of my future intentions must wait until the legislative session comes to a close."
NEWS
February 15, 2002
THE LATE, LATE SHOW Wednesday night didn't draw an Olympic-size audience, but it wasn't for lack of drama. We're talking about the one on C-SPAN, starring the U.S. House of Representatives and featuring the debate and vote on the Shays-Meehan bill, which sharply limits so-called "soft money" contributions to political parties. The show had everything: tension, mystery, histrionics, a big-star cameo appearance (Charlton Heston phoned in on behalf of the National Rifle Association) and - best of all - a happy ending.
NEWS
June 10, 1997
VILLA JULIE COLLEGE President Carolyn S. Manuszak has spent three decades transforming a tiny secretarial school in Baltimore County's Stevenson into a respected 1,800-student, four-year institution. Twice in the past year that accomplishment has been obscured by a stupid mistake.Last year, Ms. Manuszak, a former nun, was caught smoking in her office bathroom, a violation of state law for which the college was fined $1,312. Now, we learn that the $4,000 she has donated to state and local political candidates over the past decade includes at least $450 for which she asked for and received reimbursement by the college.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writer | March 7, 1994
Encouraged by Gov. William Donald Schaefer and his political brain trust, Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos has become intrigued by the prospect of running for governor and is giving the idea serious thought.The multimillionaire team owner, according to sources close to Mr. Schaefer and Mr. Angelos, would like to enter the crowded Democratic field, but must decide whether he is willing to give up or take time away from his current enterprises.What does not seem in dispute is that Mr. Angelos, a former Baltimore city councilman who ran unsuccessfully for council president and mayor in the 1960s, has a desire to re-enter the political arena.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | January 26, 1993
Another player of prominence -- not from the football field, but the political arena -- has joined the Tom Clancy/Jim Robinson team that is in the race to secure a National Football League expansion franchise for Baltimore.Ted Venetoulis is to serve as an adviser, but for the present will not be an actual investor. He will, no doubt, be utilized by Clancy and Robinson for his political expertise and business acumen in the event they are chosen as the winning Baltimore entry in the expansion derby.
TOPIC
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2005
EASTER has always been one of those odd American religious holidays. It's a celebration with ubiquitous symbolism that acknowledges our country's Judeo-Christian roots and its roughly 80 percent Christian population. Yet growing diversity has, in the public sphere at least, softened the edges of its meaning. Easter is everywhere, but the spiritual notions of sacrifice and resurrection have been dulled into the shape of a soft and warm bunny. At least that was true of Easters past. This year, secularized rabbits have been overshadowed by the much more confrontational symbol of a strained face belonging to a brain-damaged woman who languishes in a Florida hospice.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and David Kohn and Erika Niedowski and David Kohn,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2004
Dr. George Q. Daley sums up the impact of the three-year-old federal restrictions on stem cell research in two words: missed opportunities. The associate professor at Harvard Medical School has shown in mice how stem cell therapy might successfully treat patients with two bone marrow disorders. But because the government won't fund his work, he says, he can't move his research forward. "The policy, in some sense, has been a brake on the otherwise very rapid acceleration of the field," said Daley.
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2003
While serving an armed robbery sentence in a Baltimore County jail 28 years ago, Danny Bundley got word that his little brother, 14-year-old Andrey, had been dropped by a bullet on a city school playground. The elder Bundley assumed that his brother had been shot dead. But Andrey Bundley had merely fallen as he and his friends fled the yard at John Eager Howard Elementary, narrowly escaping rivals seeking revenge. He spent that summer day in 1975 like so many others, ducking the drugs and thugs at play in the Baltimore of his youth.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2002
There is little to call James Carville that he hasn't been called already: Serpent head. Slimy worm. Bottom-feeder. Court jester. Hatchet man. Pit bull. Corporal Cueball. Product of the love scene in Deliverance. Fish that swam too close to a nuclear reactor. Odious. Foul-mouthed bore. Frothing rabid dog. His deeds, views, looks - it's all fair game, he says. Having done his share of jabbing, Carville's willing to take his licks, or even an occasional pummeling. "I might be," he admits, in good ol' boy drawl, "the single most unsympathetic character in American politics."
NEWS
February 15, 2002
THE LATE, LATE SHOW Wednesday night didn't draw an Olympic-size audience, but it wasn't for lack of drama. We're talking about the one on C-SPAN, starring the U.S. House of Representatives and featuring the debate and vote on the Shays-Meehan bill, which sharply limits so-called "soft money" contributions to political parties. The show had everything: tension, mystery, histrionics, a big-star cameo appearance (Charlton Heston phoned in on behalf of the National Rifle Association) and - best of all - a happy ending.
NEWS
By LOWELL E. SUNDERLAND | December 16, 2001
THREE WINDOWS of opportunity for amateur sports groups in Howard County to make their voices heard in the county school system appeared quietly on the horizon last week. Two relate to what we wrote about here last Sunday - the 12th county high school, which is proposed to open in 2005 on an apparently too-small site in Marriottsville. The third opportunity - which you're reading about here for the first time - is the first review since 1993 of the school system's policies for allotting facilities for public use. All are golden chances for sports groups to pull together and get uncharacteristically political.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1997
Ruth Urice Keeton -- daughter of a postmaster, wife of a college vice president, mother of three, and political activist at a time when few women were in the political arena -- will be honored tonight by the Women's Bar Association of Howard County.Keeton was a pioneer for women in the county, said Bobbie Fine, immediate past president of the Women's Bar Association."We didn't even think of another name," Fine said of the association board's decision to name Keeton as recipient of its first recognition award for local women.
NEWS
By Robert Timberg and Robert Timberg,Sun Staff Writer | March 6, 1994
Encouraged by Gov. William Donald Schaefer and his political brain trust, Orioles owner Peter G. Angelos has become intrigued by the prospect of running for governor and is giving the idea serious thought.The multimillionaire team owner, according to sources close to Mr. Schaefer and Mr. Angelos, would like to enter the crowded Democratic field, but must decide whether he is willing to give up or take time away from his current enterprises.What does not seem in dispute is that Mr. Angelos, a former Baltimore city councilman who ran unsuccessfully for council president and mayor in the 1960s, has a desire to re-enter the political arena.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | June 15, 1999
THE COZY relationship between lobbyists and legislators was on full display last week at Rocky Gap golf course near Cumberland at the annual charity golf tournament led by House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr.The tournament, which was begun by Taylor's predecessor as speaker, R. Clayton Mitchell Jr., raises money for a variety of charities. It attracts a who's who crowd of State House lobbyists, some of their corporate clients and legislators.Lobbyists, while generally not opposed to a springtime round of golf, quietly grumble that the event, which costs $150, has become a command performance for anyone who wants to have influence in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | June 6, 1999
GOV. PARRIS Glendening has been busy on the appointments front in recent weeks, often mixing a heavy dose of politics -- and controversy -- with the need to find capable office-holders.In the process, the governor has:Booted out of office a reformer from the board of the troubled Injured Workers Insurance Fund, replacing her with a good-old-boy politico.Kicked out two experienced utility regulators on the Public Service Commission, replacing them with two political appointments -- just as that panel must make major decisions on implementing electric deregulation.
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