Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPolitical And Economic
IN THE NEWS

Political And Economic

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Sabra Ayres and Sabra Ayres,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 2003
KHARKOV, Ukraine - David Arnoldy, a Peace Corps volunteer from St. Paul, Minn., teaches more than the art of making a profit in his class, Essentials of Entrepreneurship, at Kharkov Polytechnic Institute in this eastern Ukrainian city, 25 miles from the Russian border. "We are not just talking about setting up a kiosk here to sell bread; we're talking about building a company or a corporation," says Arnoldy as he points to the checklist on evaluating business concepts that lights the screen behind him. Arnoldy, 59, is one of 280 volunteers serving in Ukraine, now the largest Peace Corps posting in the world.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Janet Hook and Janet Hook,Tribune Washington Bureau | December 14, 2008
WASHINGTON - The collapse of legislation to bail out the U.S. auto industry is a fitting end to this year in Congress - and a warning to President-elect Barack Obama that even larger Democratic majorities next year won't guarantee smooth sailing for his ambitious agenda on economics and other issues. Polarized, beset by crises and preoccupied with ideological and regional politics, this Congress followed a pattern familiar in the past decade. It railed and wrangled over the nation's toughest problems but in the end failed to advance solutions.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Zephirin Diabre | July 2, 1999
THE FORMERLY obscure province of Kosovo is now etched in the public's mind. So is Bosnia. As are Rwanda, Iraq and Iran. All have received extraordinary attention, and for good reason. Strife, both internal and external, attracts diplomatic and media attention. Conflict generates news. Peaceful progress does not.The fact that nations such as Mongolia or Mali or Malawi have not received such recognition should surprise no one. Yet a remarkable "good news" story exists in these and a small number of similarly often-overlooked nations: Against all odds, they are building a quiet record of democratic progress.
NEWS
By ANDREW L. YARROW | May 16, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Not too many people get doctorates in history at age 48, as I did this year. At a time when business and technology careers are venerated, and more idealistic mid-life career-changers tend to gravitate to service professions such as theology, social work, government and teaching, U.S. history might seem like a particularly eccentric choice. The experience impressed me, as an American, with the fundamental importance of knowing our nation's great and troubled, heroic and quirky story as almost a requisite for good citizenship.
NEWS
By EDSON W. SPENCER | December 19, 1991
Minneapolis. -- In the wake of all the recent media hype about Pearl Harbor, Americans need to recognize that the obvious lessons of Pearl Harbor have been learned and will never be repeated. Now is the time to address issues that can create a new framework for U.S.-Japan relations to avert a different kind of ''Pearl Harbor'' disaster.The U.S.-Japan relationship broke down before, and it could do so again if America drastically reduces its political and economic role in the Pacific and removes troops, planes and ships from Asia.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | March 27, 1991
BEIJING -- China, its national budget already awash in a record amount of red ink, plans this year to increase its military spending and largely stick by its huge subsidies to sinking state enterprises in a costly effort to maintain political stability.The net effect of these political decisions, announced yesterday during the annual meeting of China's powerless legislature, probably means unprecedented deficit spending for a nation struggling to extricate itself from an economic morass while keeping a lid on unemployment, inflation, social unrest and perceived threats from anti-socialist elements abroad.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | November 14, 2003
WASHINGTON - Reading the latest poll from the European Union, which indicates that 59 percent of EU citizens now consider Israel the greatest "threat to world peace," reading reports that Mikis Theodorakis, the composer of Zorba the Greek, has opined that Jews are "the root of evil," and observing the latest bombing in Saudi Arabia by Islamist fanatics, the following heretical thought comes to mind: The keepers of the Muslim holy places and the keepers of...
NEWS
By Henry Siegman | June 9, 1996
THE INTENSE international interest received by the election of Benjamin Netanyahu threatens to obscure and divert attention from a critical situation in the Palestinian territories whose amelioration cannot be postponed for some later time.A slower and more deliberate Israeli approach is not necessarily fatal to the ultimate success of such outstanding issues in the peace process as the Israeli-Syrian-Lebanese negotiations, further steps toward normalization with other Arab countries and even the beginning of the final status talks with the Palestinians.
BUSINESS
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | February 17, 1991
TokyoFor more than three decades, Soviet planners have visualized huge Japanese investments to unlock the coal, iron, oil and forest riches of Siberia. Japanese capitalists have longed for that difficult region's immense resources.For most of that time, visionaries on both sides have been thwarted by an intractable dispute over four islands the Red Army seized from Japan as the Imperial Army collapsed at the end of World War II.Now, with political relations thawing, President Mikhail S. Gorbachev is scheduled to come to Tokyo in April, which will make him the first top Soviet leader to visit Japan.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 28, 1993
LONDON -- The United States tried to collect the firs international payoff of President Clinton's recovery plan yesterday but emerged from a meeting of finance officials of the leading industrial powers without firm commitments that they would attack their own most pressing economic problems.The group agreed on the common need to stimulate world economic growth. But Germany did not commit to specific steps to bring down its troublesome interest rates, and Japan gave no assurances that it would speedily stimulate its own economy and reduce its huge trade surplus with the United States, officials said after the meeting.
NEWS
By Sabra Ayres and Sabra Ayres,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 18, 2003
KHARKOV, Ukraine - David Arnoldy, a Peace Corps volunteer from St. Paul, Minn., teaches more than the art of making a profit in his class, Essentials of Entrepreneurship, at Kharkov Polytechnic Institute in this eastern Ukrainian city, 25 miles from the Russian border. "We are not just talking about setting up a kiosk here to sell bread; we're talking about building a company or a corporation," says Arnoldy as he points to the checklist on evaluating business concepts that lights the screen behind him. Arnoldy, 59, is one of 280 volunteers serving in Ukraine, now the largest Peace Corps posting in the world.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | November 14, 2003
WASHINGTON - Reading the latest poll from the European Union, which indicates that 59 percent of EU citizens now consider Israel the greatest "threat to world peace," reading reports that Mikis Theodorakis, the composer of Zorba the Greek, has opined that Jews are "the root of evil," and observing the latest bombing in Saudi Arabia by Islamist fanatics, the following heretical thought comes to mind: The keepers of the Muslim holy places and the keepers of...
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 13, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The fluorescent light flicked off. The primitive air conditioner squealed to a halt. The 113-degree heat of late morning began pouring into the cinderblock house like water gushing into a damaged submarine. Muhammed Abdul al Sudani, the night watchman who lives in the one-room house at the Fatima Elementary School, didn't find it worth complaining about. "It's a hard situation," he said. "But now that Saddam has fallen, it's OK. We can wait for the future now." A mile away, in a sand-colored mansion on the banks of the Tigris River, Omar Achmad al Ibrahim pointed to his 70,000-volt generator.
TOPIC
By Marvin Kalb and Marvin Kalb,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 2003
Here, in Washington, there is another Powell who can make news. His name is Michael, he is the son of Colin and, as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, he is on the edge of rewriting the rules governing mass communications in America. No one will be surprised if, in the next few months, he opens the door to a new era of deregulation spawning huge media conglomerates that care more about political and economic power than a free, diverse and robust press, more about profit than the public interest.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | December 3, 2002
Dressed in jeans and a T-shirt crumpled from a day's work, Jose Ortiz pulled up to a meeting of Hispanic business owners nine years ago in a white van covered in graffiti. He was attending a seminar on doing business with Amtrak and hoped to pick up some work for his struggling year-old carpet business. Ortiz panicked. The other men and women were in business suits. He stood almost frozen until a few people began pulling him aside and making conversation. "I got paralyzed," he said. "I was petrified and couldn't move."
NEWS
By Michael Slackman and Michael Slackman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 2002
TEHRAN, Iran - The young police officer charges into the crowd, his knuckles white from gripping the long barrel of a tear gas gun he doesn't want to fire. His shouts are lost in the din, so he hollers louder until he can be heard: "Please, please, brothers and sisters, leave here. Leave here now." But no one leaves. Instead, more people defy a government ban and pour into the streets around Tehran University to mark the third anniversary of student demonstrations that were violently crushed by police.
NEWS
By Janet Hook and Janet Hook,Tribune Washington Bureau | December 14, 2008
WASHINGTON - The collapse of legislation to bail out the U.S. auto industry is a fitting end to this year in Congress - and a warning to President-elect Barack Obama that even larger Democratic majorities next year won't guarantee smooth sailing for his ambitious agenda on economics and other issues. Polarized, beset by crises and preoccupied with ideological and regional politics, this Congress followed a pattern familiar in the past decade. It railed and wrangled over the nation's toughest problems but in the end failed to advance solutions.
NEWS
By Michael Slackman and Michael Slackman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 30, 2002
TEHRAN, Iran - The young police officer charges into the crowd, his knuckles white from gripping the long barrel of a tear gas gun he doesn't want to fire. His shouts are lost in the din, so he hollers louder until he can be heard: "Please, please, brothers and sisters, leave here. Leave here now." But no one leaves. Instead, more people defy a government ban and pour into the streets around Tehran University to mark the third anniversary of student demonstrations that were violently crushed by police.
NEWS
By Hector Tobar and Hector Tobar,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 4, 2002
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - Wounded of mind and spirit, they come to the offices of Mirta Goldstein, a psychoanalyst of the old-fashioned stripe, the kind with a couch in one corner of her office and the collected works of Sigmund Freud in another. Her clients are well-educated Argentines suffering from the estres (stress) brought on by the unraveling of their lives. "I'm afraid I'm going to fall apart," a female patient tells her on a recent afternoon. That morning, the client had been waiting in a seemingly endless line of people at the bank, all trying to get their money out before the country's collapse.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 28, 2001
Dislike, resentment, anger and hatred toward America arise in many forms and in many places. An anti-American could be a student in South Korea, a rightist in Japan, a soccer fan in Greece, a priest in Russia, an imam in Ghana, a protester in Pakistan - or a hijacker in the United States. President Bush says that the men who flew the planes into the World Trade Center and Pentagon did so because they hated freedom. There is probably a kernel of truth in that, but people who have studied the impulses of anti-Americanism around the world agree that the real answer is more complicated and more specific than the president's explanation would suggest.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.