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NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 26, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Western Maryland Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett's social schedule last Thursday evening read like an exercise regimen: five congressional fund-raisers in 2 1/2 hours."
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NEWS
April 25, 2013
In his article on Sen. Barbara Mikulski and how her assignment as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee has helped her campaign fundraising, reporter John Fritze wrote that "For Mikulski ... the windfall underscores her transition from a lawmaker who has typically engaged more on local issues to someone who now chairs a committee that wields tremendous power on the national level. Mikulski benefited from a number of first-time donations from political action committees, including an association that represents assisted living facilities, one of the nation's largest energy companies and a leading supplier of cement.
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NEWS
February 4, 1991
During the 1990 election, political action committees in Maryland contributed $3 million to candidates; $2.4 million of that to incumbents. Among the top recipients were Governor Schaefer, who received $309,863 ($45,700 from the state's builders and contractors alone) and Senate President Mike Miller, who collected $100,773. Sen. Frank Komenda was third, with $61,100. And so on. Suffice it to say PACs are strong and growing; last year's contributions were up 71 percent from four years ago.While these gifts don't buy votes outright, at the very least they buy access and influence, which erodes the democratic process.
NEWS
May 16, 2011
Maryland law allows small political contributions to be bundled together and reported as "lump sums" in disclosure reports, and to hear defenders of the practice talk about it, the tactic is merely the campaign finance loophole for the little guy. The fat cats have their limited liability corporations, personal loans and political slates that allow them to funnel tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars into candidates' campaign accounts with no...
NEWS
February 1, 1991
"The time has come to put the national interest above the special interest and to totally eliminate political action committees."-- President George Bush in the State of the Union address."Last year the Senate passed a good bill to . . . eliminate political action committees. We're going to pass it again this year and push until it becomes law." -- Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell in the Democratic reply to the State of the Union.It is probably impossible to legally end political action committees (PACs)
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 31, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Some of the nation's most generous political contributors took a stand yesterday against a proposed rule that would bar foreign-owned American companies from forming political action committees to help finance U.S. election campaigns.If adopted, the rule could knock out close to $3 million in donations from the next election cycle. Foreign-owned companies contributed $2.8 million to political races in 1988.But company employees, not owners, supply the money that fuels PACs, and barring foreign-owned company PACs would unfairly penalize employees of those companies, according to Martin D. Garber Jr., president of the National Association of Business Political Action Committees.
NEWS
April 25, 2013
In his article on Sen. Barbara Mikulski and how her assignment as chair of the Senate Appropriations Committee has helped her campaign fundraising, reporter John Fritze wrote that "For Mikulski ... the windfall underscores her transition from a lawmaker who has typically engaged more on local issues to someone who now chairs a committee that wields tremendous power on the national level. Mikulski benefited from a number of first-time donations from political action committees, including an association that represents assisted living facilities, one of the nation's largest energy companies and a leading supplier of cement.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | January 30, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Big money continued to flash its political power in Maryland over the last four years as PACs pumped money into the hands of incumbent lawmakers at a pace 71 percent higher than four years ago, according to a report released yesterday by Maryland Common Cause.Overall, Maryland's 250 political action committees contributed $3 million to General Assembly candidates during the 1990 election, with incumbents receiving $2.4 million of the total.The money always comes with strings attached, according to Phil Andrews, executive director of Common Cause in Maryland.
NEWS
By Newsday | March 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Ross Perot is coming back to a fretting Congress today with yet another warning for the Capitol's politicians: Reform and repent or look for another job.The Texas billionaire and former presidential candidate is the star witness at a hearing of the Joint Committee on the Organization of Congress. According to congressional sources familiar with his prepared testimony, he's expected to tell the House members and senators that Congress and the entire government must undergo financial reform.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | April 26, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In this most turbulent of political years, special interest groups are putting their big-money support on hold.A record number of House retirements, the uncertainties of congressional redistricting and the House bank scandal all are converging to make 1992 one of the most volatile political years in memory.As a result, many political action committees are reluctant to sign that check until the political fog lifts, or the voters speak."We've been advising them to do this," said Bernadette Budde, vice president of Business Industry-PAC.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Howard Libit and David Nitkin and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2001
If money is the mother's milk of politics, then it flows in Maryland in great gulps. A year's worth of campaign finance data released this week show political donors to state candidates are parting with cash in large chunks - with their donations often timed to influence legislation. Consider: The state's leading political figures, Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley, took in at least 75 percent of their donations in contributions of $500 or more, much of them coming from labor unions, political action committees and corporations with business interests in the state.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jules Witcover | June 21, 1999
SAN FRANCISCO -- Welcome to the itinerant seminar of Bill Bradley, like unsyrupy 7-Up, the uncola of presidential candidates.The former New Jersey senator sits one recent morning in a circle with about 20 experts on water problems who represent such groups as Friends of the River and Save the Bay. For about 90 minutes, he engages them in a low-key, not to say esoteric, conversation about ways to conserve California's most precious natural commodity.Mr....
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 23, 1996
WASHINGTON -- As Congress reshuffles in the wake of this month's election, three Maryland members of the Republican-controlled House are taking on additional duties.Baltimore County Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., a Republican, and Baltimore Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, a Democrat, will both take seats on the Budget Committee, which fashions a blueprint for federal spending.Rep. Albert R. Wynn, a Prince George's County Democrat, is trading up from the Banking and Financial Services Committee to the Commerce Committee, which regulates most of the nation's business, ranging from securities to biomedical research.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 26, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Western Maryland Rep. Roscoe G. Bartlett's social schedule last Thursday evening read like an exercise regimen: five congressional fund-raisers in 2 1/2 hours."
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | December 15, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The snows have come since the famous summertime handshake between President Clinton and House Speaker Newt Gingrich in New Hampshire that was supposed to seal a deal on campaign-finance reform. But it hasn't happened and isn't likely to for some time.The president took the first step by creating an informal, nonpartisan panel of historians to explore ways to get the ball rolling, and issuing an invitation to the speaker to join. Mr. Gingrich dithered until recently, when he employed the traditional stalling tactic of calling for a study commission -- of an issue that has already been studied to death.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | October 10, 1994
U.S. Senate candidates Paul S. Sarbanes and Bill Brock have made their respective ties to Maryland a strong campaign theme this fall, yet both are relying heavily on money from outside the state.Fund-raising records show that of the $1.7 million Mr. Sarbanes had raised by late August, at least 38 percent came from political action committees, which make donations for special interest groups -- usually from other states.Moreover, out-of-state money accounted for nearly three quarters of the contributions from individuals listed by the Sarbanes campaign.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 23, 1996
WASHINGTON -- As Congress reshuffles in the wake of this month's election, three Maryland members of the Republican-controlled House are taking on additional duties.Baltimore County Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., a Republican, and Baltimore Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, a Democrat, will both take seats on the Budget Committee, which fashions a blueprint for federal spending.Rep. Albert R. Wynn, a Prince George's County Democrat, is trading up from the Banking and Financial Services Committee to the Commerce Committee, which regulates most of the nation's business, ranging from securities to biomedical research.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | October 10, 1994
U.S. Senate candidates Paul S. Sarbanes and Bill Brock have made their respective ties to Maryland a strong campaign theme this fall, yet both are relying heavily on money from outside the state.Fund-raising records show that of the $1.7 million Mr. Sarbanes had raised by late August, at least 38 percent came from political action committees, which make donations for special interest groups -- usually from other states.Moreover, out-of-state money accounted for nearly three quarters of the contributions from individuals listed by the Sarbanes campaign.
NEWS
By Newsday | March 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Ross Perot is coming back to a fretting Congress today with yet another warning for the Capitol's politicians: Reform and repent or look for another job.The Texas billionaire and former presidential candidate is the star witness at a hearing of the Joint Committee on the Organization of Congress. According to congressional sources familiar with his prepared testimony, he's expected to tell the House members and senators that Congress and the entire government must undergo financial reform.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau | September 19, 1992
WASHINGTON -- In the winter of 1990, Rep. Tom McMillen suddenly began picking up lucrative support from some new-found friends.The New York State Electric & Gas Corp. PAC gave $1,000 to the Anne Arundel County congressman's re-election campaign. Pacific Gas and Electric's PAC donated $2,500 and Southwestern Bell's PAC kicked in $2,000.Mr. McMillen, elected to Congress in 1986, had never before received support from these or 22 other utility and telecommunications PACs (political action committees)
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