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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jess Blumberg | January 16, 2003
What's on the agenda when an award-winning children's author and musician visits the Baltimore County library system's only Winter Reading Club? Well, here's a sneak peek of things to come when Barry Louis Polisar, a four-time Parents Choice Award-winner and the star of the Emmy Award-winning TV show Field Trip, makes an appearance at the Arbutus Branch Library on Wednesday. The entertainer plans to read his new book, A Little Less Noise, which is a collection of song lyrics arranged as poetry.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun reporter | January 27, 2008
Barry Louis Polisar and his family settled into their seats at a Bethesda movie theater as the overhead lights dimmed and the stream of movie previews gave way to soft-drink slurps and the munching of buttered popcorn, just before the movie's opening number. "You should tell them you wrote the song," said his wife, Roni. "Maybe they'll give us free tickets." "Shhhh!" said the couple's 20-something twins, Evan and Sierra, perhaps recognizing their father's urge to be incognito. He worried about how his 1977 song "All I Want Is You" would be featured in the then-newly released motion picture, Juno - and whether more than 30 years as a children's author and entertainer would be tarnished by a momentary mocking of his work on the big screen.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | September 9, 1993
Call it Barry Louis Polisar's last step on the road to vindication in Anne Arundel County. On Sunday, the singer-songwriter is scheduled to present his first public concert since his work was barred from county schools two years ago.He returned to performing in the schools a year ago but will appear for the first time in concert in the county on Sunday at 2 p.m. at the Pascal Center for the Performing Arts at Anne Arundel Community College. The children's show is a benefit forthe Annapolis section of the National Council of Jewish Women.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jess Blumberg | January 16, 2003
What's on the agenda when an award-winning children's author and musician visits the Baltimore County library system's only Winter Reading Club? Well, here's a sneak peek of things to come when Barry Louis Polisar, a four-time Parents Choice Award-winner and the star of the Emmy Award-winning TV show Field Trip, makes an appearance at the Arbutus Branch Library on Wednesday. The entertainer plans to read his new book, A Little Less Noise, which is a collection of song lyrics arranged as poetry.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | September 12, 1991
After more than a year of controversy, school officials yesterday decided folk singer Barry Louis Polisar is free once again to offer county students such sage advice as "Don't Stick Your Finger Up Your Nose."Under an agreement between Polisar and the Board of Education signed yesterday, parent-teacher associations and principals are freeto hire the performer for concerts and workshops. His books will remain on school library shelves."He was negotiating an agreement that I felt comfortable with," said Dennis Younger, the school system's executive director of curriculum.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff writer | January 6, 1991
Barry Louis Polisar can look forward to a warmer welcome in Howard County than he received in neighboring Anne Arundel, where the writer and singer of children's songs was banned from school performances last September.Polisar, who has gained a national reputation for his comic songs like "I Got a Teacher, She's So Mean," "They Said, 'Eatthe Broccoli,' " and "Don't Put Your Finger Up Your Nose," will perform a Sunday afternoon concert Feb. 3 at Glenelg High School.The singer's appearance will be a fund-raising event for Lisbon Pre-Kindergarten Inc. Parent Judy Grim, in charge of the concert, saidshe doesn't expect any adverse reaction.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | January 4, 1991
A singer and songwriter whose compositions have been banned from thecounty schools' curriculum could make educators face the music in court.Barry Louis Polisar, who had performed in county schools for 15 years, says he may sue the school system because no one told him why his work is no longer acceptable.The ban, he says, has also cost him work in other school systems.Polisar pens and performs ditties such as "Don't Stick Your Finger Up Your Nose," "Never Cook Your Sister in a Frying Pan" and "I Can Do Anything I Want to When Grandma and Grandpa Come."
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | October 6, 1991
Lunch ended quickly, just in time to transform the cafeteria into anauditorium and playground for the fanciful world of a child's imagination.And folk singer Barry Louis Polisar was the ringleader at Quarterfield Elementary, conjuring up dinosaurs working as orthodontists, mishaps with siblings and sage advice such as "Don't Stick Your Finger Up Your Nose" -- all lessons in satire.For 35 minutes, 9-year-old Blaine Tewell's eyes were focused on the funny man with the beard and guitar. He fidgeted to the whimsical tunes played by Polisar, who has never forgotten what it's like to bea little person in a big world.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson | January 15, 1991
Excuse me for a minute, I'm trying to get my finger out of my nose.You see, it all happened after I heard Barry Louis Polisar sing some of those darn songs of his.The guy's a menace.I mean, I never had the urge to stick my fingers up my nose until that blasted folk singer gave me the idea. Sure, he urged us, "Don't stick your finger up your nose," in the song of the same name. But why did he even have to put the idea in my head? I never would have thought of it myself. Now I just can't stop.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Anne Arundel Bureau of The Sun | September 12, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Controversial children's writer-singer Barry Louis Polisar has made a comeback in Anne Arundel County.The 36-year-old Silver Spring-based performer, whose works were banned by county schools last year, yesterday approved an agreement with the school board that assures that his recordings and books will stay on school library shelves."
NEWS
By Debra Taylor Young and Debra Taylor Young,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 30, 2001
IN SUPPORT OF National Reading Month, pupils at Carrolltowne Elementary were treated to an enlightening day with author and humorist Barry Louis Polisar. Polisar, 46, is an author of children's books who also performs readings of his works for schools. Many of his writings have been put to music and recorded. The children and teachers were thoroughly entertained Friday by the familiar topics Polisar shared with them. "Have you ever been told, `Don't do that?'" he asked. All hands in the crowded room were raised instantly.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | February 1, 1996
The Babe's 101stHelp celebrate the 101st birthday of Baltimore's greatest slugger with a cake and champagne toast and applaud the six winners of the "Birthday Cards for the Babe" contest at noon Feb. 6 at the Babe Ruth Museum, 216 Emory St. Recently acquired Babe Ruth and Oriole memorabilia will be unveiled in the museum's "New Stuff" exhibit area. The festivities will continue from 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. in Bambino's at Oriole Park at Camden Yards for a traditional baseball menu of all-you-can-eat hot dogs, hot pretzels, popcorn, beer, soft drinks and appearances by former Orioles Mark Williamson and Gregg Olson.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | December 16, 1994
Nationally known children's entertainer Barry Louis Polisar has a special bond with children. He can talk like them and walk like them, and his songs, including the classic "Don't Put Your Finger Up Your Nose," send them into spasms of laughter.To what does Mr. Polisar attribute his rapport with youngsters?"Basic immaturity," he replied.The singer-songwriter brought down the house at the Mount Airy Elementary School cafeteria yesterday, charming his young fans with songs, stories and poems that conjure up an irresistible world of childish anarchy.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Staff Writer | September 9, 1993
Call it Barry Louis Polisar's last step on the road to vindication in Anne Arundel County. On Sunday, the singer-songwriter is scheduled to present his first public concert since his work was barred from county schools two years ago.He returned to performing in the schools a year ago but will appear for the first time in concert in the county on Sunday at 2 p.m. at the Pascal Center for the Performing Arts at Anne Arundel Community College. The children's show is a benefit forthe Annapolis section of the National Council of Jewish Women.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | October 6, 1991
Lunch ended quickly, just in time to transform the cafeteria into anauditorium and playground for the fanciful world of a child's imagination.And folk singer Barry Louis Polisar was the ringleader at Quarterfield Elementary, conjuring up dinosaurs working as orthodontists, mishaps with siblings and sage advice such as "Don't Stick Your Finger Up Your Nose" -- all lessons in satire.For 35 minutes, 9-year-old Blaine Tewell's eyes were focused on the funny man with the beard and guitar. He fidgeted to the whimsical tunes played by Polisar, who has never forgotten what it's like to bea little person in a big world.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | September 12, 1991
After more than a year of controversy, school officials yesterday decided folk singer Barry Louis Polisar is free once again to offer county students such sage advice as "Don't Stick Your Finger Up Your Nose."Under an agreement between Polisar and the Board of Education signed yesterday, parent-teacher associations and principals are freeto hire the performer for concerts and workshops. His books will remain on school library shelves."He was negotiating an agreement that I felt comfortable with," said Dennis Younger, the school system's executive director of curriculum.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | December 16, 1994
Nationally known children's entertainer Barry Louis Polisar has a special bond with children. He can talk like them and walk like them, and his songs, including the classic "Don't Put Your Finger Up Your Nose," send them into spasms of laughter.To what does Mr. Polisar attribute his rapport with youngsters?"Basic immaturity," he replied.The singer-songwriter brought down the house at the Mount Airy Elementary School cafeteria yesterday, charming his young fans with songs, stories and poems that conjure up an irresistible world of childish anarchy.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,Sun reporter | January 27, 2008
Barry Louis Polisar and his family settled into their seats at a Bethesda movie theater as the overhead lights dimmed and the stream of movie previews gave way to soft-drink slurps and the munching of buttered popcorn, just before the movie's opening number. "You should tell them you wrote the song," said his wife, Roni. "Maybe they'll give us free tickets." "Shhhh!" said the couple's 20-something twins, Evan and Sierra, perhaps recognizing their father's urge to be incognito. He worried about how his 1977 song "All I Want Is You" would be featured in the then-newly released motion picture, Juno - and whether more than 30 years as a children's author and entertainer would be tarnished by a momentary mocking of his work on the big screen.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Anne Arundel Bureau of The Sun | September 12, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Controversial children's writer-singer Barry Louis Polisar has made a comeback in Anne Arundel County.The 36-year-old Silver Spring-based performer, whose works were banned by county schools last year, yesterday approved an agreement with the school board that assures that his recordings and books will stay on school library shelves."
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | March 28, 1991
A mob of 2,500 young White House visitors will get to hear something Monday that most county school children cannot -- the songs of folk singer Barry Louis Polisar.Polisar, whose material has been banned by county schools, and his three-toed, triple-eyed, double-jointed dinosaur will be the guests of George and Barbara Bush at the annual Easter egg roll on the White House lawn.The singer and composer hasn't worked much in the county since September, when a review committee ruled his tapes, records and six books inappropriate for children.
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