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NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | March 30, 1992
The focus of economic attention on the democracies emerging from communism has been on freeing their markets, figuring out how to get the profits rolling that will spur the delivery of goods and services.The Johns Hopkins Institute for Policy Studies decided to look another way, at non-profit institutions that are beginning to sprout in the rubble of the Iron Curtain.Though some are re-births of organizations that existed before World War II, for the most part their roots are shallow and their status fragile since they are growing in societies where everything was supposed to be non-profit just a few years ago.Ten representatives of Eastern European non-profit organizations -- charity groups that do everything from helping the elderly and mentally ill to encouraging start-up businesses -- are winding up a six-week stay in Baltimore and environs.
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NEWS
By Scott Klinger | December 26, 2012
While America's CEOs are fretting about the government's so-called "fiscal cliff," millions of American workers face a financial disaster that gets much less media attention. There's a half-trillion-dollar deficit in the nation's worker retirement benefits. The Great Recession, which decimated retirement assets, played a big role in building this lesser-known cliff. But many corporations could have avoided the problem by shoring up these funds during the boom years. Instead, they siphoned pension assets for other profit-boosting purposes.
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BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | August 30, 2007
Top private-equity and hedge-fund managers made more money in 10 minutes than the average U.S. worker made all of last year, according to a new study from two research groups. The 20 highest-paid fund managers made an average of $657.5 million, or 22,255 times the U.S. average annual salary of $29,500, said the study, released yesterday by Institute for Policy Studies and United for a Fair Economy. The study was based on data from the Labor Department and Forbes magazine. "The fact that these pay levels for fund managers are so out-of-sight is going to drive up pay at publicly traded companies," said Sarah Anderson, director of the global economy program at the Institute for Policy Studies and a co-author of the study.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2010
Amira Williams barely survived a deadly fire three years ago that burned her family's home and 95 percent of her body. Now, the young girl faces a new tragedy. The 7-year-old will be moving out of her North Broadway home between Christmas and New Year's, but her mother, Chrissy Thomas, doesn't know where the family of four will go. Baltimore housing records show that Thomas' rental has at least 26 code violations, including rodent and mold problems and peeling paint, which could be a lead-poisoning hazard.
BUSINESS
By LESTER S. PICKER | June 22, 1992
There's a well-kept secret in Baltimore, and it goes by the name of the Johns Hopkins University Institute for Policy Studies. Most Baltimoreans do not even know that this hometown jewel exists -- or that it influences the non-profit sector worldwide.In providing research about and service to the non-profit sector, few organizations can rival the institute. In the confusion following the breakup of the Soviet empire, how does a newly formed Eastern European democracy begin building the infrastructure for a non-profit sector?
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 29, 2002
NEW YORK - Enron Corp., Qwest Communications International Inc. and 21 other companies whose accounting is under investigation paid their chief executives 70 percent more than the U.S. CEO average, according to a study released yesterday. The CEOs of companies under review earned an average of $62.2 million from 1999 through 2001, more than the $36.5 million average of CEOs at about 360 companies profiled in Business Week magazine's annual surveys, according to a report by United for a Fair Economy and the Institute for Policy Studies.
NEWS
February 11, 2002
Annapolis officials to celebrate buses with cards, candy Riders on Annapolis transit buses will receive Valentine's cards and candy Thursday, when officials mark the addition of four new vehicles to the fleet. Mayor Ellen O. Moyer will cut a ribbon to launch the buses at 2:30 p.m. at City Dock. The 30-foot Thomas buses were sold to the transit service by American Bus Sales and Service of Annapolis. Annapolis educator named UCLA visiting professor Philip M. Burgess, president of the Annapolis Institute for Leadership & Technology, has been appointed visiting professor of policy studies at UCLA's School of Public Policy and Social Research.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | November 25, 1996
Maryland's warehouse industry is booming, but the state could do much more to lure distribution jobs here, according to a new study by Johns Hopkins University's Institute for Policy Studies.Distribution accounts for as much as 30 percent of the state's private sector employment -- more than 50 times the employment in biotechnology -- and contributes $28 billion annually to Maryland's economy, the study found."Maryland has made important progress in developing a significant distribution industry," said Dr. Maryann P. Feldman, an Institute for Policy Studies research scientist who discussed the study at a seminar Friday.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2001
Despite conventional wisdom that says fewer residents make a weaker city, a study released yesterday says that Baltimore's great population loss in the past decade doesn't necessarily mean the city is in a downward spiral. Graduate students at the Johns Hopkins University Institute for Policy Studies maintain in the study that the city's overall health can better be measured by examining the appearance and social environment of its neighborhoods, as well as more traditional factors. The students assert that while the city's crime rate and school performance are important, they are not the only measure of whether Baltimore is healthy.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2001
Despite conventional wisdom that says fewer residents make a weaker city, a study released yesterday says that Baltimore's great population loss in the past decade doesn't necessarily mean the city is in a downward spiral. Graduate students at the Johns Hopkins University Institute for Policy Studies maintain in the study that the city's overall health can better be measured by examining the appearance and social environment of its neighborhoods, and more traditional factors. The students assert that while the city's crime rate and school performance are important, they are not the only measure of whether Baltimore is healthy.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | August 30, 2007
Top private-equity and hedge-fund managers made more money in 10 minutes than the average U.S. worker made all of last year, according to a new study from two research groups. The 20 highest-paid fund managers made an average of $657.5 million, or 22,255 times the U.S. average annual salary of $29,500, said the study, released yesterday by Institute for Policy Studies and United for a Fair Economy. The study was based on data from the Labor Department and Forbes magazine. "The fact that these pay levels for fund managers are so out-of-sight is going to drive up pay at publicly traded companies," said Sarah Anderson, director of the global economy program at the Institute for Policy Studies and a co-author of the study.
NEWS
By ERIC SIEGEL | October 5, 2006
Peter Salins came to Baltimore last week to posit a simple but significant question: "Have U.S. cities turned the corner?" The answer he gave -- at a seminar sponsored by the Johns Hopkins University's Institute for Policy Studies -- was a qualified yes. "I believe there is a seismic shift taking place in urban America, and for the most part it is a beneficial one," said Salins, an urban scholar and vice chancellor of academic affairs of the State University...
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2003
As Baltimore school officials begin to re-examine policies governing student behavior, parents and advocates are urging that more be done for misbehaving students before suspending or expelling them from school. "It is important to maintain safety in schools," said Philip J. Leaf, director of the Center for Prevention of Youth Violence at Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health. "[But] it also is important to provide youth in trouble with the types of support that will help them stay in school and graduate to success."
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 29, 2002
NEW YORK - Enron Corp., Qwest Communications International Inc. and 21 other companies whose accounting is under investigation paid their chief executives 70 percent more than the U.S. CEO average, according to a study released yesterday. The CEOs of companies under review earned an average of $62.2 million from 1999 through 2001, more than the $36.5 million average of CEOs at about 360 companies profiled in Business Week magazine's annual surveys, according to a report by United for a Fair Economy and the Institute for Policy Studies.
NEWS
February 11, 2002
Annapolis officials to celebrate buses with cards, candy Riders on Annapolis transit buses will receive Valentine's cards and candy Thursday, when officials mark the addition of four new vehicles to the fleet. Mayor Ellen O. Moyer will cut a ribbon to launch the buses at 2:30 p.m. at City Dock. The 30-foot Thomas buses were sold to the transit service by American Bus Sales and Service of Annapolis. Annapolis educator named UCLA visiting professor Philip M. Burgess, president of the Annapolis Institute for Leadership & Technology, has been appointed visiting professor of policy studies at UCLA's School of Public Policy and Social Research.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2001
Despite conventional wisdom that says fewer residents make a weaker city, a study released yesterday says that Baltimore's great population loss in the past decade doesn't necessarily mean the city is in a downward spiral. Graduate students at the Johns Hopkins University Institute for Policy Studies maintain in the study that the city's overall health can better be measured by examining the appearance and social environment of its neighborhoods, as well as more traditional factors. The students assert that while the city's crime rate and school performance are important, they are not the only measure of whether Baltimore is healthy.
NEWS
By Scott Klinger | December 26, 2012
While America's CEOs are fretting about the government's so-called "fiscal cliff," millions of American workers face a financial disaster that gets much less media attention. There's a half-trillion-dollar deficit in the nation's worker retirement benefits. The Great Recession, which decimated retirement assets, played a big role in building this lesser-known cliff. But many corporations could have avoided the problem by shoring up these funds during the boom years. Instead, they siphoned pension assets for other profit-boosting purposes.
BUSINESS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Evening Sun Staff | February 21, 1991
The ongoing economic slowdown in Maryland should be mild and brief compared with the 1982 recession, according to a panel of regional forecasters.Maryland's economy "will begin its upturn during the summer," said Robert N. Schoeplein, research director for the Maryland Department of Economic and Employment Development."
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2001
Despite conventional wisdom that says fewer residents make a weaker city, a study released yesterday says that Baltimore's great population loss in the past decade doesn't necessarily mean the city is in a downward spiral. Graduate students at the Johns Hopkins University Institute for Policy Studies maintain in the study that the city's overall health can better be measured by examining the appearance and social environment of its neighborhoods, and more traditional factors. The students assert that while the city's crime rate and school performance are important, they are not the only measure of whether Baltimore is healthy.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2001
He leaves for Albania today, and after visiting old friends, he will move on to war-torn Macedonia, where he is a consultant teaching practical civics. Then, it's Turkey for an international conference sponsored by the Johns Hopkins University, and finally Puerto Rico for more teaching. It's a schedule that might fatigue a twenty-something, but at 70, former Howard County Executive J. Hugh Nichols can't wait to get started. Despite years of work, and setbacks punctuated by armed ethnic conflicts in Eastern European nations struggling to modernize, Nichols has no thought of retirement.
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