Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPolicy On Gays
IN THE NEWS

Policy On Gays

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Boston Globe | September 10, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Senate endorsed a tougher version of President Clinton's policy on gays in the armed forces yesterday, defeating a proposal to ease the policy and calling homosexuality "an unacceptable risk" to morale in the armed forces.An amendment proposed by Sen. Barbara Boxer, a Democrat from California, which would have given the president the final say in policy on gays in the military, was defeated as expected by a vote of 63-33. Key Democratic leaders voted against Ms. Boxer's proposal.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Carrie Wells, Tribune Newspapers | May 23, 2013
In an emotionally charged vote Thursday, the Boy Scouts of America lifted its ban on gay youth starting in January, the latest sign of a shift in American attitudes toward gays and lesbians. After months of debate in local districts, more than 61 percent of the Boy Scouts national council approved a resolution at its annual meeting, overturning the long-standing prohibition on openly gay youth, while retaining a ban on gay adult leaders. Of 1,232 votes, 757 were in favor. Gay advocates called the vote a step in the right direction for the 103-year-old group, among the nation's largest youth organizations, with more than 2.6 million youth members.
Advertisement
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | January 27, 1993
WASHINGTON -- No politician with the common sense of a gnat would choose to get into a roaring controversy over the rights of homosexuals. But President Clinton now has no choice but to press ahead with his plan to reverse the prohibition against gays and lesbians in the armed forces.With the benefit of hindsight, it is easy to say candidate Clinton might have been wiser to have hedged his promise to the gay community during the campaign. There was no reason to believe gays and lesbians would prefer either George Bush or Ross Perot.
NEWS
By Christi Parsons and Janet Hook and Christi Parsons and Janet Hook,Tribune Newspapers | January 28, 2010
WASHINGTON - - Warning that the nation had developed a "deficit of trust" in government, President Barack Obama promised Wednesday night to put the public's top concerns - jobs and the economy - at the center of his second year in office while continuing to press for a health care overhaul and the rest of his stalled agenda. In his first State of the Union address, Obama acknowledged that, for many Americans, the change he promised as a presidential candidate has seemed slow in coming.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 22, 1993
The man on the radio needs jumper cables attached to his tongue. He's so agitated about this gays-in-the-military business that the words can't find their way out of his mouth fast enough. Nouns, verbs, all manner of modifiers are tumbling madly, breathlessly, a random spill out of a verbal revolving door, until finally, exasperatedly, comes this:"Homosexual literature," he cries. "They'll be bringing homosexual literature into United States Army barracks."Minutes later, I reach the office of a friend of mine, who is gay and more open about it than the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff would find acceptable if he ever wished to abandon civilian life.
NEWS
By Richard H. P. Sia and Richard H. P. Sia,Washington Bureau | July 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Sen. Sam Nunn, D-Ga., the Senate Armed Services Committee chairman, said yesterday he would like to write President Clinton's policy on gays in the military into law -- if he and the rest of his panel can figure it out.There was tremendous confusion among the senators on the committee at the first of two hearings to sort out details of the so-called "don't ask, don't tell, don't pursue" policy that eases the military's 50-year-old ban on...
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington BureauWashington Bureau | October 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's policy on gays in the military may ultimately be upheld by the courts, but for now it is in deep legal trouble, and uncertainty over its future seems likely to last for months.Just as the president appeared this week to be putting the issue behind him by getting his new policy through Congress, the gays policy was under attack from two federal judges -- one here and the other in California.Justice Department lawyers have been going to court after court for weeks to defend the Pentagon against a variety of constitutional challenges by gay soldiers or sailors.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 17, 1992
Bill just found out the brass who have to make it work say his policy on gays in the military wouldn't. Big surprise.This administration can get something done if Bill will lead where Tom Foley doesn't.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | May 20, 1993
A policy on gays in the military is not easy. There are two ga members of Congress, and they disagree.The meaning of "Honor Code" at the Naval Academy in the stolen exam case (like the Mafia's) makes clear how the Tailhook scandal could happen.They wanted a hawk for poet laureate. So they got Dove.Cheer up. Danes approved the Maastricht Treaty."Star Wars" is being converted from a black hole to a burnt-out nova.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | July 31, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration, making a full-scale legal defense of both old and new government policies on gays in uniform, has told two federal courts that the issue must be left almost entirely to the discretion of the military.In a move aimed at thwarting complaints of unconstitutional bias against homosexuals in the military, Justice Department lawyers argued that a judgment by the military services that homosexuals must be treated differently to meet military needs is enough to satisfy the Constitution.
NEWS
July 12, 2009
Rep. Patrick Murphy of Pennsylvania, an Iraq war veteran, is making a push this summer for a congressional repeal of the "don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays in the military. Even back in 1993, when President Bill Clinton first proposed this artless dodge, a majority of Americans favored letting gays serve openly. Sixteen years later, the numbers are overwhelming; a CNN/Opinion Research poll in December found 81 percent of Americans now share that belief. But not in Congress. Mr. Murphy has about 160 co-sponsors, almost all of them Democrats.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Mehren and Elizabeth Mehren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 9, 2005
BOSTON - Twelve gays and lesbians brought suit yesterday against the federal government, seeking to overturn the "don't ask, don't tell" policy that bars homosexuals from openly serving in the military. The six men and six women, representing every armed service branch except the Marines, also asked to be reinstated in the military. Each had served in the war on terrorism, and all were dismissed after they disclosed their sexual orientations to superiors. The Bush administration asked U.S. District Judge George A. O'Toole Jr. to dismiss the case, known as Cook v. Rumsfeld, arguing, "Courts should not second-guess congressional judgment."
NEWS
By Mark I. Pinsky and Mark I. Pinsky,ORLANDO SENTINEL | February 1, 2004
MELBOURNE - Members of St. John's Episcopal Church voted overwhelmingly yesterday to walk away from their denomination over the issue of homosexuality, rejecting their bishop's plea to stay. With less than half of their 887 registered members voting, the congregation decided 282-62 to leave the Episcopal Church USA, and affiliate with the Anglican Mission in America. The Anglican Mission broke from the Episcopal Church in 2000. For now, St. John's century-old building will remain the property of the Episcopal Diocese of Central Florida.
NEWS
By Melody Holmes and Melody Holmes,SUN STAFF | July 6, 2000
About 50 people - some of them former scouts - gathered in front of local Boy Scouts of America headquarters in the 700 block of Wyman Park Drive yesterday to protest last week's Supreme Court decision that bars states from forcing Scout troops to accept gay leaders. Protesters included representatives of several gay-rights organizations. Some carried hand-made signs with such messages as "Teach hope, not hate," and "Legal intolerance is still intolerance." "The Boy Scouts are sending the message that I'm inherently inferior because of who I am; that's a message that's ridiculous.
NEWS
December 13, 1999
This is an edited excerpt of a Chicago Tribune editorial, which was published Friday.THE chilling story of 21-year-old Army private Barry Winchell illustrates, as if any additional evidence were needed, why the Pentagon's "don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays in the military is unworkable -- and why it ought to be eliminated.Mr. Winchell enlisted in 1997, filled with dreams of becoming a helicopter pilot. But because he was gay, he soon was subjected to months of harassment and was ultimately bludgeoned to death with a baseball bat by fellow private Calvin Glover.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 3, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In the most complete court defeat yet for the government's "don't ask, don't tell" policy, a federal judge in New York ruled it is unconstitutional for the armed forces to treat homosexuals differently solely because of their sexual activity.U.S. District Judge Eugene H. Nickerson of Brooklyn, ruling in a case that may go to the Supreme Court, said the military services may not impose "unequal conditions" on homosexuals based on their sexual behavior."It is not within our constitutional tradition for our government to designate members of one societal group as pariahs," the judge said.
NEWS
December 13, 1999
This is an edited excerpt of a Chicago Tribune editorial, which was published Friday.THE chilling story of 21-year-old Army private Barry Winchell illustrates, as if any additional evidence were needed, why the Pentagon's "don't ask, don't tell" policy on gays in the military is unworkable -- and why it ought to be eliminated.Mr. Winchell enlisted in 1997, filled with dreams of becoming a helicopter pilot. But because he was gay, he soon was subjected to months of harassment and was ultimately bludgeoned to death with a baseball bat by fellow private Calvin Glover.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Mehren and Elizabeth Mehren,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 9, 2005
BOSTON - Twelve gays and lesbians brought suit yesterday against the federal government, seeking to overturn the "don't ask, don't tell" policy that bars homosexuals from openly serving in the military. The six men and six women, representing every armed service branch except the Marines, also asked to be reinstated in the military. Each had served in the war on terrorism, and all were dismissed after they disclosed their sexual orientations to superiors. The Bush administration asked U.S. District Judge George A. O'Toole Jr. to dismiss the case, known as Cook v. Rumsfeld, arguing, "Courts should not second-guess congressional judgment."
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau of The Sun | March 31, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A federal judge in New York, accusing the Clinton administration and Congress of giving in to "irrational prejudices" against homosexuals, ruled yesterday that it is unconstitutional to discharge military service members just for saying they are gay or lesbian.The ruling by Judge Eugene H. Nickerson of Brooklyn against the "don't ask, don't tell" policy was the first on the constitutionality of the main features of a compromise worked out in 1993.The judge's decision struck at the heart of the policy: a provision that allows homosexuals to remain in the service -- a change from a long-standing former policy that banned all homosexuals -- but allows them to remain only if they do not admit they are homosexual or if they can convince their commander that their admission of homosexuality was wrong.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington BureauWashington Bureau | October 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's policy on gays in the military may ultimately be upheld by the courts, but for now it is in deep legal trouble, and uncertainty over its future seems likely to last for months.Just as the president appeared this week to be putting the issue behind him by getting his new policy through Congress, the gays policy was under attack from two federal judges -- one here and the other in California.Justice Department lawyers have been going to court after court for weeks to defend the Pentagon against a variety of constitutional challenges by gay soldiers or sailors.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.