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By Colin Campbell and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Dealing with police can involve a delicate balance between knowing your rights and being respectful to officers. Both are crucial, seven lawyers told a church full of Baltimore's black youths and their parents. But when in doubt, attorney Douglas B. Evans said, "you have the right to shut up. " The panel of black attorneys answered questions about police brutality and racial profiling, amid other concerns during the seminar, Conscious Operations during Police Stops, or "C.O.P.S.," at the Empowerment Temple Church on Tuesday night.
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NEWS
September 30, 2014
Thank you to The Sun for your hard-hitting, front page article highlighting the abuse of power by some members of the Baltimore City Police Department ("Undue force," Sept. 28). "A disturbing pattern" and "frightful human toll" are apt expressions used in the article to which we must add "unacceptable racist practices against African Americans" to seemingly describe a culture in the Baltimore City Police Department which we all know continues to this day. We citizens of Baltimore need proof that severe measures are being taken to correct Baltimore's "national reputation of not being a professional and effective department," as you state in the article.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
Two men were shot - one of them fatally - in Highlandtown on Tuesday just after midnight, police said. The shooting occurred in the 3700 block of E. Pratt St. at about 12:30 a.m., police said. Officers were called for a report of gunshots heard in the area and found a man who had been shot in the back. He died at a hospital. Police said a second victim was found "nearby" with non-life-threatening injuries. Police did not release the ages or identities of the victims. A motive and suspect description was not provided.
NEWS
September 30, 2014
With a resurgence of violence in Ferguson, Mo., I am reminded of a revelation that I had over 30 years ago upon becoming an inner city police officer. I learned to accept, but not fully understand, that the perceived value to human life on the street in many of the downtrodden areas of America is substantially lower than it is to the police and many others living under better socio-economic circumstances. When the two cultures of diverse values clash it often results in those with higher self-esteem being forced to take actions they would not choose to take except out of a desire for self-preservation.
NEWS
By John L. Hudgins | September 30, 2014
Following the urban unrest in the 1960s, there was a move toward requiring college degrees for police officers. That movement never gained serious momentum across the nation. Today only a few of the police departments across the country require applicants to possess a college degree, and concerns are still being raised as to whether today's police officers are best prepared to deal with the myriad of situations presented in modern policing. Indeed there are serious questions as to whether a modern democracy can survive without better prepared law enforcement officials able to handle the stresses of the job without overreacting.
NEWS
September 29, 2014
Last week, Gannett Co. Inc., owner of The Daily Times in Salisbury, filed a lawsuit in Worcester County Circuit Court to force Ocean City to release the name of a 17-year-old drowning victim from Parkville. A number of the newspaper's readers have already expressed outrage at the litigation, with one letter writer describing it as "wrong, just plain wrong" and others questioning what possible public interest is served by knowing the name, particularly given that the victim's family has specifically asked that it not be released.
NEWS
September 29, 2014
Taking their queue from the classic movie "Casablanca," some city officials are declaring themselves "shocked, shocked!" to learn that police brutality is a serious problem in Baltimore. An investigative report on Sunday by The Sun's Mark Puente found the city has paid out more than $5.7 million since 2011 in judgments or settlements of more than 100 lawsuits brought by citizens alleging excessive use of force and other police misconduct. Three years earlier, the city's budget office also raised concerns over its spending $10.4 million from 2008 through 2011 - an average of about $3.5 million annually - defending the Baltimore Police Department against misconduct lawsuits.
NEWS
Staff reports and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
A Prince George's County man has been arrested and charged in connection with the March 2013 targeted attack and killing of Davidsonville resident Nicole Burgess. On Monday, Anne Arundel County police announced the arrest of Terrence Robert Proctor, 37, of the 4100 block of Oliver Street, Hyattsville, on charges of first-degree murder, second-degree murder and manslaughter. The body of 37-year-old Nicole C. Burgess had been found on March 22, 2013, by officers who responded to the 3300 block of Royale Glen Court in Davidsonville for a report of a death.
NEWS
Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
State and local politicians continued the call Monday for heightened scrutiny of Baltimore police officers who are the focus of brutality allegations, urging tougher penalties for offenders and greater disclosure of internal discipline. "Police brutality is completely inexcusable. I'm going to apply justice fairly, even to those who wear a badge," said Marilyn Mosby, who is expected to be the next Baltimore state's attorney. The Democrat is the only major party nominee on the ballot, though she faces opposition in the Nov. 4 election from a write-in candidate.
NEWS
By Justin George and Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
A Baltimore woman received a 40-year prison sentence Monday in the death of her 1-year-old grandson and abuse of her granddaughter after a judge said she rubbed methadone onto the children's gums before she put them to bed and headed off to a party. Towanda Reaves, 51, took responsibility for the boy's death but said she never meant to kill him. "This is not the intentional killing of her grandson, but those who think this was some form of tragic accident misunderstand the case, and misunderstand the jury's analysis of it," said Baltimore Circuit Judge Timothy Doory.
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