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By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2010
The tactics used by federal agents to befriend a young man professing jihadist sentiments — and to help him plot an attack on a military recruiting center in Catonsville — are becoming more common nationwide. But even as such cases raise questions about entrapment, legal experts say most defendants have a hard time convincing juries that they were unfairly targeted. "Entrapment is a very difficult defense," University of Maryland law professor Michael Milleman said, a day after 21-year-old Antonio Martinez was accused of plotting to blow up the Armed Forces Career Center on Baltimore National Pike.
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NEWS
By Paul Marx | September 11, 2014
When it comes to policing, in some places less is better than more. Fewer police departments can result in better protection and better service. In places like Ferguson, Mo., hostility toward the police would be far less likely if the parent St. Louis County had fewer police departments - or even better, only one. County governments have evolved over time by a variety of ways, with a tendency toward more centralization. The particular form local government takes matters a great deal.
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2012
Parked in Anne Arundel County and Annapolis are cars with tempting stuff in plain sight: a GPS unit on the dashboard, a cellphone on the console, a handbag with a wallet visible in it on the floor behind the driver's seat. But it isn't just would-be thieves looking to see what's in the car and tugging on its door handles. Police are doing it too, in programs aimed at stopping thefts from parked vehicles. Police from both jurisdictions recently walked through parking lots and neighborhoods, finding numerous cars in which items that would catch a thief's eye were in plain sight: keys, cash, bicycles, financial paperwork, even a washer-dryer unit for an RV. In the recent walk-throughs, only about one in every 10 cars was unlocked, though police say in some neighborhoods that number is likely nine of 10. "My purse is in there," Kim Harris said when Anne Arundel County police Cpl. Brian Carney asked her whether she had left anything of value in view after she locked her car in the lot at Big Vanilla Athletic Club in Pasadena on a recent evening.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells and Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
A veteran Baltimore County police officer was suspended this week and faces several criminal charges after the department said he tried to break into a Dundalk home in search of drugs. Officer Joseph Stanley Harden, 31, of Towson told investigators he became addicted to Oxycodone after a work-related injury. He was charged late Thursday with attempted burglary, drug possession, attempted robbery and malicious destruction of property. The department said he has been suspended without pay. His police powers also have been suspended.
NEWS
By Sara Engram | February 2, 1997
IF ALL THE PEOPLE Adam Walinsky has buttonholed to discuss his dream of a Police Corps had been present for the program's official kick-off in Maryland last week, the group could have filled a good chunk of the Convention Center.As it was, the gathering at Baltimore City police headquarters packed a sizable room. Ironically, Mr. Walinsky wasn't able to attend, but there was ample testimony to his unswerving devotion to this dream.Two other key players were there -- Jonathan Rubinstein who, along with Mr. Walinsky, came up with an ROTC-like program to rejuvenate police departments, and Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, who first began working on the Police Corps idea in 1982.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | April 10, 2000
After police shot one robbery suspect fleeing a Northeast Baltimore bar yesterday and arrested the other, the city's new acting police commissioner said the incident showed that the department is taking the right tack in revising its crime-fighting strategy. Acting Commissioner Edward T. Norris told reporters that police arrived at the bar within 30 seconds of receiving the robbery call because they had been staking out the Belair Road corridor, site of at least five similar robberies in the past two weeks.
NEWS
By Lisa Goldberg and Lisa Goldberg,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2001
This is Jason Kindel at his best: Daddy and policeman and volunteer all rolled into one. At Bollman Bridge Elementary School in Savage, Kindel is playing one recent day, hoisting the 3- and 4-year-old preschoolers in Bonnie Bricker's class for hugs. He regularly volunteers here; Kindel's almost-4-year-old twin girls are also in Bricker's class. It's a far cry from his beat, from nabbing bad guys and getting drugs off the street in Whiskey Bottom - but not really. After all, Kindel is passionate about ridding the area of drugs because of the kids.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 28, 1994
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- As part of an urgent attempt to give Haiti a functioning police force, 353 soldiers from the Haitian military are participating this week in a six-day crash course in how to be police officers.Their hasty and rudimentary training is a stopgap until Haiti's police force is reconstructed. About 70 percent of the 3,000 police have deserted, leaving too few competent officers to patrol the streets.Trainers from the U.S. Justice Department and Canada are giving "overviews of Haitian laws and human rights -- basically telling them not to use the bumpers of their cars to do interrogations or hook people up to electrical wires," a U.S. official involved in the training said wryly.
NEWS
July 6, 1996
SUMMER IS HERE. School is out. That means recreation programs for children are needed. Yet the city's revenue problems have led it to cut the recreation and parks budget. Recreational services will get only about $12 million, versus $13 million last year. The Police Department wants to fill the breach. Unfortunately, this logical step has drawn unexpected criticism.Baltimore has 69 recreation centers. As of this month, 20 are operated solely or jointly by the Police Athletic League. It makes sense.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1997
Daniel Davis could have been a lawyer or a businessman backed by an Ivy League diploma. Instead, he chose police work.Davis, 53, retired as a lieutenant last month after 26 years with the Howard County police.A quarter-century ago, his choice of careers caused his friends' jaws to drop."A few people have questioned me over the years about my particular career choice after going to Cornell," Davis said. "But I decided to throw my lot with the local police."Colleagues say his work ethic and high expectations resulted in key programs in the department, from a 1970s burglary-prevention project whose major initiatives are still in force today to the Auxiliary Police Force begun in 1995.
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By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 28, 2014
The written questions from the audience of more than 100 people came fast and furious on cards read aloud by City Councilman Bill Henry, moderator of the 3rd annual Public Safety Summit at Morgan State University on Saturday. What can city police do about underage drinking, motorists not stopping for pedestrians at crosswalks, and juveniles who are arrested for breaking into homes and then end up back out on the street, doing it again? Why is Roland Park less crime-prone than Cherry Hill?
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 25, 2014
As a crime summit approaches and a survey finds public mistrust of police, the beat goes on for one Northern District officer who patrols the crime-prone Pen Lucy area. "It's the passion that I have," said Officer Edwin Albino, 37, of Edgewood, a nearly eight-year veteran of the Baltimore City Police Department and a Puerto Rico state police officer before that. "As soon as I wake up in the morning and put my uniform on, there is a sense of pride. I will work in any (police) district, because I'm representing Baltimore City police.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | February 1, 2014
Anne Arundel County is moving to restart its police cadet program, which was eliminated more than a decade ago in a round of budget cuts. Officials said this week that for about $180,000 per year, the county's Police Department could hire 10 part-time cadets - young adults who would learn police work while helping with duties such as directing traffic, canvassing neighborhoods and completing paperwork. County Council Chairman John Grasso, a Glen Burnie Republican, is sponsoring a resolution encouraging the Police Department to reinstate the cadet program if money can be found for it. A public hearing is scheduled for Feb. 3. "I know this $180,000 is going to be good money to help the Police Department out," Grasso said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
Baltimore Police Commissioner Anthony W. Batts cited "old-fashioned police work" in the arrest Friday of a 19-year-old man who is accused in a robbery that left a Canton man seriously injured. Mustafa Mohammed Ali Eraibi, 19, of Northeast Baltimore is charged with attempted first-degree murder in connection with a Jan. 14 attack in the 3400 block of Foster Ave. "Today, for the Canton area, you can sleep well. This guy is in custody," Batts said. According to police, Jonathan Fogg, 30, suffered facial fractures, bleeding on the brain and the loss of several teeth, among other injuries.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
John H. Brown, who headed the Baltimore Police Department's mounted patrol for more than a decade and later became Carroll County sheriff, died Jan. 11 of heart failure at his Uniontown home. He was 85. "He was fair, a gentleman, as were his deputies," said Perry Jones, a former Carroll County commissioner who is now mayor of Union Bridge. "It was a new start for the department when he came to Carroll County, and he was a man who had his own ideas when it came to law enforcement.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
Two men and two women were killed in Baltimore over the weekend, with one woman found shot multiple times in a car and another fatally stabbed. A woman was stabbed in her stomach and arm in the 4400 block of Fairview Avenue in the West Forest Park neighborhood of Northwest Baltimore at about 8 p.m. Sunday, according to police. Homicide detectives have a person of interest in custody, and the woman, who later died at a local hospital, was not identified Sunday night. A man was also shot multiple times in West Baltimore on Sunday afternoon and was later pronounced dead at a local hospital.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 26, 1991
Twenty years ago, the average American police officer was a white man from a military background, without any college education.The handful of female officers were not even allowed to ride in patrol cars after dark in some cities.Today the police are more representative of the nation's racial makeup than many institutions, including Congress.They are better educated than the typical worker. Women do almost every job that men do. And, contrary to public perception, they are less likely to kill or be killed on the job than at any time in the last two decades.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
Tipped that Darryl Martin Anderson's year on the run had taken him to Birmingham, Ala., U.S. Marshals set up outside an apartment complex Wednesday morning and watched as his car and its Maryland plates backed into a parking space and an unknown man walked inside. Marshals could see people inside the apartment peeking out through the blinds at them as they prepared to rush in. A woman emerged and said Anderson wasn't inside. But within moments, the 25-year-old man Baltimore police had dubbed "Public Enemy No. 1" appeared with his hands up. After Anderson emerged, with his distinctive dreadlocks and forehead tattoos, police say they found a .40-caliber Glock and two bulletproof vests inside.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2013
For years, the 122 officers and civilians who work for the Anne Arundel County Police Department's Eastern District have worked in a cramped, oddly designed station in Pasadena. Prisoners have to be shuttled down a hallway between booking and holding areas. Officers do not have enough room to write reports. Computer wires dangle from the ceilings. And people often can't find the station, which is tucked away off Mountain Road. The police are about to get new digs, though.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2013
Tipped that Darryl Martin Anderson's year on the run had taken him to Birmingham, Ala., U.S. Marshals set up outside an apartment complex Wednesday morning and watched as his car and its Maryland plates backed into a parking space and an unknown man walked inside. Marshals could see people inside the apartment peeking out through the blinds at them as they prepared to rush in. A woman emerged and said Anderson wasn't inside. But within moments, the 25-year-old man Baltimore police had dubbed "Public Enemy No. 1" appeared with his hands up. After Anderson emerged, with his distinctive dreadlocks and forehead tattoos, police say they found a .40-caliber Glock and two bulletproof vests inside.
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