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By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | October 2, 2008
Maryland State Police "over-reached" and disregarded civil rights when they spied on anti-death penalty and peace activists in 2005 and 2006, according to a report commissioned by Gov. Martin O'Malley and released yesterday. Undercover troopers and their bosses were not justified in their surveillance of peaceful protesters and ignored the free-speech implications of their actions, concluded former Maryland Attorney General Stephen H. Sachs in a 93-page report. Police may have violated federal law when they labeled activists as possible terrorists in a multistate database, the report said.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
George B. Brosan, a career law enforcement officer who had served as Maryland State Police superintendent, died Thursday of cancer at his Annapolis home. He was 78. "He was a titan in both attitude and influence, and had a splendid career in law enforcement," said Cornelius J. Behan, retired Baltimore County police chief. "He was devoted to his family and he was devoted to the job. He brought integrity to his work and the agency by respecting the rules and the rule of law. " "George was as honest as can be and his integrity was never questioned," said Frank Panessa of Annapolis, who had worked with Mr. Brosan at the U.S. Customs Service as well as the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, which became the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.
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NEWS
September 14, 2000
Maryland State Police accepted a federal grant yesterday to install 93 cameras in cruisers that patrol Interstate 95 between Baltimore and Virginia. The $396,000 was part of $12 million given to state police agencies throughout the country by Community Oriented Policing Services in the U.S. Department of Justice. The office is headed by former Baltimore Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier. Col. David B. Mitchell, state police superintendent, said the cameras will "accurately record our interactions with citizens during traffic stops."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2011
Col. Terrence B. Sheridan, who capped a nearly five-decade career in law enforcement by leading the Maryland State Police through nearly all of Gov. Martin O'Malley's tenure, will retire at the end of July. Marcus L. Brown, who has been chief of the Maryland Transportation Authority Police since 2007, has been named his replacement. The governor chose Brown to run the authority when he was second in command of the Baltimore Police Department. "Colonel Sheridan has done a tremendous job leading the more than 2,500 employees of the Maryland State Police," O'Malley said in his announcement.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1997
Jerry F. Barnes, state's attorney for Carroll County, yesterday become the first county prosecutor in Maryland to receive a state police superintendent's salute.Barnes, 48, received the citation from Maj. Gary Cox, central region commander, and Lt. Lawrence E. Faries, commander of the Westminster barracks, on behalf of Col. David B. Mitchell, state police superintendent. The award was presented in Barnes' office.Cox praised Barnes for his dedication and cooperation, recalling that the state's attorney once left his sickbed to answer legal questions and offer advice on filing charges.
NEWS
July 23, 2008
Should police be able to spy on our neighbors within limits? That's the challenging, post-9/11 question a committee of Maryland legislators will have to confront this fall as it investigates a wasteful, lengthy state police intelligence unit's surveillance of peace groups and death penalty opponents. The hearings should get to the bottom of how this unit operates, who it targets and if the right oversight policies are in place to protect Maryland citizens. Since the 2005-2006 spying operation was disclosed by the American Civil Liberties Union last week, Gov. Martin O'Malley and Col. Terrence B. Sheridan, the state police superintendent, have assured Marylanders that police investigators aren't breaking the law and won't improperly launch surveillance against citizens who are exercising their constitutional right to freely speak and meet.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | February 10, 2009
Calling the governor's plan too weak, the ACLU urged lawmakers yesterday to pass a more robust proposal aimed at preventing police monitoring of peaceful groups. Dozens of activists gathered at the State House for the organization's "No Spying Day." Susan Goering, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland, said Gov. Martin O'Malley's bill "not only has loopholes but condones and protects" the kinds of spying and dossier-keeping that took place in a Maryland State Police operation revealed last summer after an ACLU lawsuit.
NEWS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1995
Maryland State Police combined drug and criminal investigations yesterday in a restructuring move that the agency's superintendent said would streamline operations and increase staff levels for community policing.Lt. Col. Larry E. Harmel, second in command on the force, will be in charge of the new Drug and Criminal Investigations Bureau, which will have 300 troopers and officers.The change also will mean new supervisory assignments in the field for eight detective sergeants, with duties that will free other personnel for highway and community policing, officials said.
NEWS
February 27, 1999
IN WHAT can only be viewed as a blatant case of retaliation, the paramedic who recently won a federal sex discrimination lawsuit against the Maryland State Police now is being required to undergo psychiatric examination.The police agency claims that it is "routine" for officers to submit to psychiatric evaluation when the agency questions their fitness for duty. Statements by Trooper 1st Class H. Kevin Knussman during the trial raised concern about his ability to function as a helicopter paramedic, according to State Police lawyers.
NEWS
March 30, 1999
Lt. Terry Katz, commander of the Maryland State Police barracks in Westminster, will be one of 44 troopers to be honored todayin a promotion ceremony at state police headquarters in Pikesville.Katz and six others were promoted Dec. 9 to the rank of lieutenant and installed as barracks commanders.Four troopers will be elevated to the rank of captain and 33 were to receive supervisory ranks of corporal, sergeant and first sergeant from Col. David B. Mitchell, state police superintendent.Mitchell also planned to make a special "honorary trooper" presentation to Jake Rome, a 6-year-old from Baltimore County.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 3, 2009
Brushing aside assurances from the Maryland State Police that troopers will never again secretly monitor and collect information on peaceful protest groups, state lawmakers and Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration are moving ahead with a plan to outlaw such tactics and will push for legislative action at hearings today. The discredited state police operation, revealed last summer after the American Civil Liberties Union sued for information on it, included troopers in the agency's homeland security division disguising their identities to e-mail organizers and attending meetings.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | February 10, 2009
Calling the governor's plan too weak, the ACLU urged lawmakers yesterday to pass a more robust proposal aimed at preventing police monitoring of peaceful groups. Dozens of activists gathered at the State House for the organization's "No Spying Day." Susan Goering, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Maryland, said Gov. Martin O'Malley's bill "not only has loopholes but condones and protects" the kinds of spying and dossier-keeping that took place in a Maryland State Police operation revealed last summer after an ACLU lawsuit.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,gadi.dechter@baltsun.com | October 2, 2008
Maryland State Police "over-reached" and disregarded civil rights when they spied on anti-death penalty and peace activists in 2005 and 2006, according to a report commissioned by Gov. Martin O'Malley and released yesterday. Undercover troopers and their bosses were not justified in their surveillance of peaceful protesters and ignored the free-speech implications of their actions, concluded former Maryland Attorney General Stephen H. Sachs in a 93-page report. Police may have violated federal law when they labeled activists as possible terrorists in a multistate database, the report said.
NEWS
July 23, 2008
Should police be able to spy on our neighbors within limits? That's the challenging, post-9/11 question a committee of Maryland legislators will have to confront this fall as it investigates a wasteful, lengthy state police intelligence unit's surveillance of peace groups and death penalty opponents. The hearings should get to the bottom of how this unit operates, who it targets and if the right oversight policies are in place to protect Maryland citizens. Since the 2005-2006 spying operation was disclosed by the American Civil Liberties Union last week, Gov. Martin O'Malley and Col. Terrence B. Sheridan, the state police superintendent, have assured Marylanders that police investigators aren't breaking the law and won't improperly launch surveillance against citizens who are exercising their constitutional right to freely speak and meet.
NEWS
August 10, 2007
Carter's crime views not nearly so naive Ann LoLordo's Editorial Notebook "Promises to keep" (Aug. 4) did a great disservice to readers. Ms. LoLordo stated that "As part of Jill P. Carter's crime platform, she says she `will enter into a memorandum of understanding with the state that will allow Maryland state troopers to help provide more emergency services in the city.'" "If she had bothered to ask the state police superintendent about this she would have discovered they are already here -- more than a dozen troopers are assisting city police in specialty units.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2005
Col. Thomas Spence Smith, the longest-serving Maryland State Police superintendent in history, died in his sleep Wednesday after a brief illness. He was 87. Colonel Smith, who passed away at Genesis Spa Creek Center in Annapolis, also was the first career state police officer to attain the rank of superintendent. He joined the force in 1940, five years after the police agency was formed. In 1970, he was appointed superintendent by Gov. Marvin Mandel and served for 12 years until his retirement.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | March 3, 2009
Brushing aside assurances from the Maryland State Police that troopers will never again secretly monitor and collect information on peaceful protest groups, state lawmakers and Gov. Martin O'Malley's administration are moving ahead with a plan to outlaw such tactics and will push for legislative action at hearings today. The discredited state police operation, revealed last summer after the American Civil Liberties Union sued for information on it, included troopers in the agency's homeland security division disguising their identities to e-mail organizers and attending meetings.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | September 4, 1992
Maryland law enforcement officials will be searching for drunken drivers on land and on the water over the Labor Day weekend.In fact, the state police and the Natural Resources Police are calling in everyone from their superintendents on down -- even those who usually work behind desks -- to beef up patrols over the weekend that traditionally brings summer to a close."
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Laura Barnhardt and Del Quentin Wilber and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2003
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s staff is searching for a potential replacement for Maryland State Police Superintendent Edward T. Norris, who is under an intensifying federal investigation of his activities as Baltimore police commissioner. Ehrlich administration officials declined to comment publicly on the search, saying they do not talk about personnel matters. However, sources familiar with the replacement search said that top state officials, with the help of a private investigator, launched background checks of at least six candidates for the job in recent weeks.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | September 9, 2003
Maryland State Police Sgt. Steve L. Aaron was perched 20 feet above U.S. 50 yesterday, blending in with the canopy of trees and telephone wires. In a truck-mounted crane often called a cherry picker, Aaron had a bird's-eye view of the motorists speeding by. But they rarely saw the trooper - and that was the point. By the time drivers realize there's a trooper with a radar gun in the trees, they're being pulled over by other troopers waiting a few hundreds yards from Aaron on the ground.
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