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By Steve McKerrow | July 24, 1991
The really funny thing about "Police Squad!", the quirky 1982 series that spawned the hit movies "The Naked Gun" (1989) and this summer's sequel "The Naked Gun 2 1/2 : The Smell of Fear," is that it was all right there in the beginning -- all the adolescent gags, word plays and stupid, silly, hilarious stuff.But nobody got it in 1982, when ABC ran just six episodes before canceling the show. At least the network didn't get it, for Alex McNeil's reference work, "Total Television," quotes an ABC executive as saying the show required "too much attention" from viewers.
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By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,Sun reporter | March 24, 2008
Sgt. Robert Smith believed the elite unit he commanded was doing good work. It was early 2005 and crime in the distressed Southwest District was down, he said. Arrests were up. "They were giving us awards from the commissioner's office," Smith said in an interview last week. "We were constantly getting certificates of achievement. ... They were commending us at Comstat on a weekly basis. We were rolling." But within a year, top police officials disbanded the "flex squad" and labeled it a rogue operation.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 24, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- CBS has a delicious bit of recycling in store for viewers starting tonight, as well as a new show that even its producer, Rob Reiner, calls "an acquired taste."If you are a fan of Leslie Nielsen and "Naked Gun," don't miss the return of "Police Squad!" at 8 tonight (and subsequent Wednesdays) on WBAL-TV (Channel 11)."Police Squad!" is the 1982 ABC-TV spoof of cop shows that inspired the phenomenally successful "Naked Gun" movies.The TV series was canceled after only six episodes.
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By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN REPORTER | October 20, 2006
A woman who says she was sexually assaulted by a city police officer who is accused in two separate rape cases has filed a civil lawsuit. The multimillion-dollar lawsuit filed in Baltimore Circuit Court names three members of the now-defunct Southwestern District "flex squad" - Jemini Jones, Brian Shaffer and Steven Hatley. Jones, 29, was indicted in May on charges of rape, sex offense and misconduct in office in the Oct. 24 incident described in the civil lawsuit. Neither Shaffer, 29, nor Hatley, 28, faces criminal charges in that incident.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 16, 2001
Having your first film as a director hailed as one of the funniest comedies in movie history is pretty heady stuff. But when, more than 20 years later, the accolades continue - when even the august American Film Institute ranks it among America's all-time 10 best laugh-fests - does the head rush continue? Well, maybe the adrenaline doesn't pump as fast. But for Jerry Zucker, the idea of being one of the warped brains that begat Airplane! is still something to be savored. "The legacy of Airplane!
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By Michael Hill | July 17, 1991
Los Angeles -- FOR THE NETWORKS, these are the bad new days. The strong winds of financial turmoil are rocking and reeling these once stable and solid ships of the American economy.The erosion of audience to cable, independents and Nintendo continues unabated. The news divisions are suffering so many layoffs that they seem on their way to becoming nothing more than an anchor talking into a lone, robotic camera, introducing reports provided by local affiliates.The sour advertising market, the cost of covering the Persian Gulf war, the Hollywood price spiral that drives up the price of proven talent provide further headaches.
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By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | June 12, 1992
Faith Parker has seen enough to make sure her children stay close to home.There was the time she passed drug dealers and felt afraid in her neighborhood; the time she had to slam up the window after two of them came running to her car; the time she heard gunfire from her back yard and saw a man shot.Yesterday, the mother of four joined her neighbors at Annapolis Gardens, one of the city's 10 public housing communities, in welcoming back the police. Parents and children lined the street to wave at the men and women in blue walking by with a small parade of housing officials and television crews.
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By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,Staff writer | November 7, 1991
Annapolis police, hoping to build better relations with communities,plan to open five new offices.Placing at least one member of thefive-officer Community Oriented Police Squad (COPS) in a different area also is expected to reduce non-emergency calls for service, Assistant Chief Joseph S. Johnson said."The new approach will provide information to the community that may not be related to crime-fighting," he said. As examples, he citedelectrical, plumbing and neighborhood conflicts police do not normally handle.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF Sun television critic David Zurawik contributed to this article | February 7, 1997
MPT's monthlong commemoration of Black History Month continues with a compilation of four documentary stories on W. E. B. DuBois."Unsolved Mysteries" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Was Nirvana's Kurt Cobain murdered? Private investigator Tom Grant says he thinks so; hear him plead his case. NBC."The Simpsons" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Mary Poppins? Not quite. It's Shary Bobbins to the rescue, as Marge starts losing her hair and hires a nanny to help relieve the stress she's sure is the cause.
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By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | July 7, 1995
Annapolis police yesterday opened a new substation in the Clay Street neighborhood, ending a month-long sweep by Maryland troopers to combat drugs and violence in the community and beginning a permanent police presence in the neighborhood."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 16, 2001
Having your first film as a director hailed as one of the funniest comedies in movie history is pretty heady stuff. But when, more than 20 years later, the accolades continue - when even the august American Film Institute ranks it among America's all-time 10 best laugh-fests - does the head rush continue? Well, maybe the adrenaline doesn't pump as fast. But for Jerry Zucker, the idea of being one of the warped brains that begat Airplane! is still something to be savored. "The legacy of Airplane!
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By GREGORY KANE | August 13, 1997
We civilians know so much more about how to handle folks armed with dangerous weapons, I say we should take that job away from the police. Let's have a special civilian group - The Squad That Knows Everything About Disarming Armed Suspects handle the task.On Saturday, 22-year-old James Quarles was armed with an 8-inch knife near Lexington Market. Officer Charles M. Smothers shot Quarles in the right shoulder when he refused to drop the weapon. Quarles was pronounced dead on arrival at Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
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By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1997
At first glance, Pulaski Highway between Golden Ring Mall and the Baltimore line seems little more than a quiet, though uninviting, strip of female revue bars, motels and convenience stores."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF Sun television critic David Zurawik contributed to this article | February 7, 1997
MPT's monthlong commemoration of Black History Month continues with a compilation of four documentary stories on W. E. B. DuBois."Unsolved Mysteries" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Was Nirvana's Kurt Cobain murdered? Private investigator Tom Grant says he thinks so; hear him plead his case. NBC."The Simpsons" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Mary Poppins? Not quite. It's Shary Bobbins to the rescue, as Marge starts losing her hair and hires a nanny to help relieve the stress she's sure is the cause.
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By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Anne Haddad contributed to this article | October 31, 1996
Sgt. Barry Leese of the state police Computer Crimes Unit catches crooks with nothing more than a keyboard, modem, phone line -- and some old-fashioned detective work."
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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 11, 1996
The Maryland State Police and the state Fire Marshal's Office are investigating a possible pipe bomb discovered Friday outside a Leonardtown shopping center in St. Mary's County.The device, made from small carbon dioxide canisters, was found shortly after 7 p.m. in an outdoor eating area at the Wildewood Shopping Center on Route 235. It was destroyed by state police bomb squad technicians.Sgt. Steve Vail of the state police said someone called 911 with a bomb threat shortly before the device was found.
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BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 11, 1996
The Maryland State Police and the state Fire Marshal's Office are investigating a possible pipe bomb discovered Friday outside a Leonardtown shopping center in St. Mary's County.The device, made from small carbon dioxide canisters, was found shortly after 7 p.m. in an outdoor eating area at the Wildewood Shopping Center on Route 235. It was destroyed by state police bomb squad technicians.Sgt. Steve Vail of the state police said someone called 911 with a bomb threat shortly before the device was found.
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By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1997
At first glance, Pulaski Highway between Golden Ring Mall and the Baltimore line seems little more than a quiet, though uninviting, strip of female revue bars, motels and convenience stores."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1996
The Baltimore Police Department's homicide unit has a new squad of detectives to help investigators clear hard-to-solve drug slayings and at the same time bring down violent narcotics organizations.Team members hope to gather enough intelligence to piece together a more complete picture of the violence, instead of what often seems to be a series of unconnected events.With about 60 detectives working hundreds of cases each year -- most of which are drug-related -- investigators no longer can sit around the coffee room and compare notes.
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By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | December 9, 1995
The Baltimore Police Department has launched a small squad of officers to confiscate guns on city streets, helped by an ad campaign to encourage residents to call police when they see illegal firearms.Five officers from the Violent Crimes Task Force have been operating for two weeks and have seized 35 handguns, police said. The officers are trying to identify people carrying concealed weapons by how they act and walk.Full-page advertisements and a 30-second television spot are donated by Trahan, Burden and Charles Inc. advertising agency.
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