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By Peter Hermann | peter.hermann@baltsun.com | November 26, 2009
When Baltimore police forced their way inside a rowhouse on North Luzerne Avenue, they were acting on a tip that occupants were selling drugs. The bust was based, a department spokesman said, "on community intelligence." Police charging documents filed this week say detectives found what they were looking for: •A blue shoe box inside a tall dresser in a basement bedroom that contained a digital scale, a cell phone, large and small plastic bags containing up to a half-pound of suspected marijuana and two bags containing suspected drug residue, each filled with cash - $100 in one, $325 in another.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Mark Puente and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
A Middle River man who accused a Baltimore police officer of assault and battery will receive nearly $50,000 in a settlement approved Wednesday by the city's spending panel. Charles Faulkner accused Officer Daniel Hersl of battering his face with a police radio and his fists during an arrest Sept. 1, 2010, in the 1900 block of Wolfe St., according to court records and a settlement memo. The Board of Estimates approved the settlement without discussion, although City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young voted to reject the agreement.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2011
Mary Jane LaPlante, a retired Baltimore City police sergeant who handled military aircraft during World War II, died of complications from Alzheimer's disease Friday at Carroll Lutheran Village. She was 88 and lived in Westminster. Born Mary Jane White in Baltimore and raised on Linnard Street, she attended St. Bernardine's Parochial School and was a 1940 graduate of the Institute of Notre Dame. She attended the University of Maryland, College Park. Family members said that as a young woman, Mrs. LaPlante wanted to learn to fly a plane and bicycled from her home off Edmondson Avenue to the old Rutherford airfield near Woodlawn, where she took flying lessons.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
The state's highest court ordered a new trial Wednesday for a former Baltimore police sergeant convicted nearly two decades ago of murdering his young mistress - a ruling that could affect cases that relied on bullet testing used for decades until being debunked. Gina Nueslein, a 22-year-old clerk at a Royal Farms, became entangled with Sgt. James Kulbicki, who was 14 years her senior, in a relationship that soured as she sued him for child support. Twenty years later, Kulbicki has a chance to demonstrate the innocence he has maintained, but Nueslein's family must experience the ordeal of her death again.
NEWS
November 21, 2009
The 21-year-old son of a Baltimore police sergeant was arrested Thursday night after officers raided the family's rowhouse in the 1000 block of N. Luzerne Ave. and found a half-pound of marijuana, the department's chief spokesman said. The sergeant, who was not identified but is assigned to the Northern District, has been placed on desk duty. Spokesman Anthony Guglielmi said an internal investigation is being conducted to determine whether the officer knew about the drugs and whether drugs were being dealt from the house.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
A veteran Baltimore police sergeant received probation Friday after being convicted for failing to act during an assault on a drug suspect. Sgt. Marinos N. Gialamas said that it was "a split-second decision" that had ended with him standing before a circuit court judge. "This is the last place I ever thought I'd be," the 19-year veteran said before he choked up and was unable to continue. Anthony Williams, another officer who was convicted of assault in the case, received a jail term this week.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
The gun battle raged in three different spots near the old Murphy Homes high-rise in West Baltimore, ending on a cold February day with the death of a 20-year-old man in a hail of gunfire from four city police officers. Four years later, one of the officers claimed he was diagnosed with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, but says he never got the help he needed to cope with killing a man. Instead, Richard A. Willard says the department is trying to fire him. The sergeant sued the Police Department this week, and is seeking an injunction in U.S. District Court court to delay his Feb. 22 termination hearing.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2013
A Baltimore City police sergeant faces up to 10 years in prison after he was convicted Friday of perjury and malfeasance for using false information to obtain a search and seizure warrant. Sgt. Dennis W. Workley, who joined the force in 1996, was charged with the misdemeanors last May after a complaint to the department spurred a months-long, joint investigation by the city police's internal affairs unit and state's attorney's office. In a statement Friday, Police Commissioner Anthony Batts said the department, which initiated the investigation, "has an obligation to preserve the public trust.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | May 24, 2012
Sgt. Richard Willard, who this week settled a lawsuit he filed against the city alleging he never got help after fatally shooting a man in 2005, sent me an email wanting to explain his situation further. I had talked to his attorney on Wednesday. The sergeant, who agreed to drop his litigation in exchange for the city dropping its bid to fire him, will retire July 1, giving him 20 years on the job and enough time to collect his pension, about half his $73,000 salary. His allegations raised questions about whether city officers who fire their guns suffer emotional distress and whether the department gives them enough help.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2014
City prosecutors have dropped all charges against a Baltimore police sergeant accused of surreptitiously recording a conversation with a judge, the state's attorney's office announced Friday. Sgt. Carlos Vila, whose earlier jury trial on the charges ended with a mistrial, agreed to step down and may not seek future employment in law enforcement, prosecutors said. Vila's attorney, Catherine Flynn, declined to comment. Prosecutors had charged Vila with misconduct in office and intercepting electronic communications.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 11, 2014
First there was the infamous speed camera ticket that Baltimore issued to a car stopped at a red light. Now comes evidence that the city's former contractor approved a speeding citation for another vehicle that couldn't possibly have been going too fast — because it was parked. "Things like this will kill the program!" Baltimore police Sgt. Paul McMillian told officials with the city and Brekford Corp., the former contractor, in an April 13 email obtained by The Baltimore Sun. McMillian said that "the blue pickup truck is clearly parked against the curb lane," yet Brekford approved the speed camera ticket and forwarded it to the Police Department for review.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2013
A first-degree assault charge filed against a Baltimore Police sergeant alleged to have pointed a gun at her son's head has been reduced to carrying a weapon while under the influence of alcohol after the son changed his story, according to prosecutors. Robin Blackmon, 44, had the charge reduced during a preliminary hearing in court on Friday. In addition to the reduced charge, she still faces multiple traffic charges, including driving while under the influence of alcohol, in connection to the July 17 incident.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
After a drawn-out argument with her adult son early on the morning of June 17, Robin Blackmon called Baltimore County police from her Catonsville home and told a dispatcher that her son was out of control, according to police and court records. Blackmon, a sergeant in the Baltimore Police Department, told the dispatcher she had a gun, county police say. Her son, Andrew Bratcher, was heard in the background by a dispatcher saying his mother had "pulled a gun out on him," according to records.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2013
A Baltimore City police sergeant faces up to 10 years in prison after he was convicted Friday of perjury and malfeasance for using false information to obtain a search and seizure warrant. Sgt. Dennis W. Workley, who joined the force in 1996, was charged with the misdemeanors last May after a complaint to the department spurred a months-long, joint investigation by the city police's internal affairs unit and state's attorney's office. In a statement Friday, Police Commissioner Anthony Batts said the department, which initiated the investigation, "has an obligation to preserve the public trust.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | August 1, 2012
A Baltimore police sergeant was indicted Wednesday on charges of misconduct and violating state wiretap statutes for secretly recording a conversation with a judge, the city State's Attorney's Office announced. Sgt. Carlos M. Vila, who has served on the executive board of the Baltimore City Fraternal Order of Police, is scheduled to be arraigned on the charges Oct. 10. He could not be reached for comment Wednesday. According to the state's attorney's office, he recorded part of an April telephone conversation with Maryland District Court Judge Joan B. Gordon without her knowledge and played it a month later at the Southeast District Police Station.
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