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By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2011
Howard County police are reviewing how they disseminate information on their community notification system after residents complained about early-morning calls they received July 23. An automated call went out about 5 a.m. after an autistic teen visiting from New Jersey left a Columbia house about 3:15 a.m. and couldn't be found despite a search that included the use of policedogs and a helicopter. "We typically don't have alerts go out until 6 a.m. but we were very concerned about waiting because of the high temperatures and the fact that he couldn't provide his name if anyone found him," said police spokeswoman Sherry Llewellyn.
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NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | July 5, 2014
The circumstances involving Baltimore police investigations into three cases where officers' use of force has been questioned were publicly disclosed for the first time last week. The Police Department decided last month to publicly disclose all cases involving deadly or serious police force under internal review to improve transparency and public accountability. Seventeen incidents are under review. The incidents not previously known are: On Jan. 25, Officer William Berardi went to a home in the 300 block of Ballou Court after a woman said she had been attacked by her husband.
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NEWS
Baltimore Sun staff reports and Baltimore Sun staff reports | May 30, 2014
Anne Arundel County police are taking a fresh look at a case they visited in 2007, involving the disappearance of a woman that may date back to the 1970s. Police are asking if anyone knows the whereabouts of, or has any information about, Karen Beth Kamsch, a woman who would be 52 today and may have disappeared in 1976 - though police are uncertain of the circumstances. The department on Friday issued a photo of Kamsch as she looked at about age 14; and an age progression rendering of how police think she may look today.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said Wednesday that she has asked her senior team to explore giving Baltimore's police civilian review board a "more impactful" role in the police disciplinary process. "In order for us to be consistent across the board when we're talking about civic engagement, we have to make sure the ways in which we touch the public are impactful," she said. "I don't have answers on what, if any changes there will be. That's definitely something I am looking at. " The Police Department recently asked the civilian review board to review major "use of force" cases such as officer-involved shootings.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
A "breakdown" in how Baltimore Police officers handled an alleged pit bull attack in South Baltimore that sent a 7-year-old boy to the hospital last week is now the subject of an internal police review, after animal control was left in the dark about the attack for several days, according to police and city health officials. "Was it something that slipped through the cracks?" said Anthony Guglielmi, a police spokesman, on Tuesday afternoon, several hours after animal control officers responded to the home in the 2000 block of Ramsay Street and confiscated the dog for observation.
NEWS
By Shelly Greenberg | March 19, 1999
CITIZEN oversight of local police is essential. However, establishing an independent civilian review board to oversee discipline of Baltimore police officers is not.Independent civilian review boards have merit in some cities where they help restore the public's willingness to file complaints once police officials have demonstrated that they are unable or unwilling to discipline officers.This is not the case in Baltimore. The vast majority of police officers are committed to protecting individual rights, adhering to law and policy and providing a high degree of service.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | March 16, 1999
The Baltimore City Council introduced a resolution last night supporting a civilian police review board.Baltimore Democratic State Sen. Ralph M. Hughes introduced legislation last month that would create an 18-member panel to examine the conduct of police officers. Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, who has opposed previous efforts to create the board, is supporting the legislation that would give the board subpoena power to call witnesses, gather documents and discipline officers.Southwest Baltimore Councilman Norman A. Handy Sr. introduced the resolution last night.
NEWS
By Matthew Mosk and Matthew Mosk,SUN STAFF | April 11, 1999
After more than six years of trying, Baltimore lawmakers won final approval in the General Assembly last night to create a civilian police review board.The state Senate voted unanimously to approve the citizen panel, which would conduct independent investigations of complaints against city police officers. The bill awaits only the governor's signature."This is a board whose time has come," said Sen. Nathaniel J. McFadden, chairman of the city's Senate delegation. "This will give a chance for regular folks to know that their concerns about the police will be taken seriously."
NEWS
By Matthew Mosk and Matthew Mosk,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1999
A legislative committee gave new life yesterday to a bill that would create a civilian police review board in Baltimore, voting unanimously to send the measure to the Senate floor.Until yesterday's vote in the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee, the bill was idle in both houses of the General Assembly at a time when movement is crucial to secure passage.The bill, which would create a citizen panel to review allegations of police misconduct in Baltimore, has support from the city's mayor, council, police commissioner, police union and its state legislators.
NEWS
By Matthew Mosk and Matthew Mosk,SUN STAFF | March 31, 1999
Legislation that would create a citizen board in Baltimore to hear complaints against police has stalled in the General Assembly and might die at the hands of two powerful committee chairmen, neither of whom lives in the city.The bill's supporters say Baltimore residents have long demanded a civilian board to provide an unbiased look at charges of police misconduct. The proposal won widespread support from the city's legislators, as well as the mayor, the City Council, the police commissioner and the police union.
NEWS
July 1, 2014
A year after Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake pledged to reinvigorate the city's civilian police review board, panel members say nothing much has changed. That's hardly surprising. The board still lacks the power to investigate citizens' complaints of police misconduct in a timely fashion, and its recommendations are routinely ignored by the department. A panel so toothless that even its own members publicly wonder whether their efforts are a complete waste of time obviously isn't accomplishing its mission as a mediator of police-community relations.
NEWS
Baltimore Sun staff reports and Baltimore Sun staff reports | May 30, 2014
Anne Arundel County police are taking a fresh look at a case they visited in 2007, involving the disappearance of a woman that may date back to the 1970s. Police are asking if anyone knows the whereabouts of, or has any information about, Karen Beth Kamsch, a woman who would be 52 today and may have disappeared in 1976 - though police are uncertain of the circumstances. The department on Friday issued a photo of Kamsch as she looked at about age 14; and an age progression rendering of how police think she may look today.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2013
Six city residents were sworn-in Monday to take seats on Baltimore's police civilian review board, part of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's effort to remake a panel described as irrelevant and ineffective. The civilian board, which is tasked with reviewing police misconduct complaints, has sat half-vacant for years, and the panel's recommendations are rarely followed, according to reports in The Sun. The mayor also appointed a new chairwoman to lead her Anti-Animal Abuse Advisory Commission.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2013
Five city residents have been nominated to take seats on Baltimore's police civilian review board, filling out a volunteer panel that has been described as irrelevant and ineffective. For years, the civilian review board has had four vacancies out of nine positions, indicative of the erosion of interest in the once-controversial board by city officials and police. Baltimore's board sometimes gets misconduct complaints from police after the cases have already been closed, and the panel's recommendations - which are not made public - are very rarely followed.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2013
A "breakdown" in how Baltimore Police officers handled an alleged pit bull attack in South Baltimore that sent a 7-year-old boy to the hospital last week is now the subject of an internal police review, after animal control was left in the dark about the attack for several days, according to police and city health officials. "Was it something that slipped through the cracks?" said Anthony Guglielmi, a police spokesman, on Tuesday afternoon, several hours after animal control officers responded to the home in the 2000 block of Ramsay Street and confiscated the dog for observation.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2013
A Northwest Baltimore woman was nominated to the city's police civilian review board on Monday night, the first move in filling as much as eight positions on the beleaguered nine-member board.  The nomination of Sunny Luisa Cooper for the unpaid position represents the second time Cooper's name has been submitted to the board, which investigates citizen complaints of abusive language and excessive force by police. She was originally put forward along with two others by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake in 2011, and confirmed by the council, but the swearing-in never took place.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2001
Sykesville is considering hiring a consultant to evaluate its Police Department, survey residents on law enforcement issues and recommend public safety improvements. The study would occur as Chief Wallace P. Mitchell retires after 12 years leading the six-member police force, and could help the town in its search for Mitchell's successor. "It is important that the town operate as efficiently as possible, and sometimes an outsider can give us a fresh perspective," said Mayor Jonathan S. Herman of the study.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2013
In a mostly empty ninth-floor conference room on a recent Thursday evening, the civilian panel charged with investigating police misconduct in Baltimore met for its monthly meeting. There are supposed to be nine members, but four chairs were empty - those positions have been vacant for years. Of the five positions that are filled, four of the members said they want out, having long overstayed the limits of their terms. When the board was created more than a decade ago, boosters promised it would prove a crucial check on brutality and abusive language by police officers.
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