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NEWS
November 7, 1993
C The time has come for Gov. William Donald Schaefer to do away with the cocoon-like protection he is given by the Maryland State Police. It costs taxpayers $1.5 million a year for this gubernatorial security blanket -- far more than in other states.Does the governor need police protection? Absolutely. Does he need so much security? Probably not. A force of 20 troopers guards the governor, the mansion and his companion, Hilda Mae Snoops. They act as chauffeur and errand-boy for Mrs. Snoops, they walk the governor's dog, they help with gardening at the governor's private home.
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NEWS
August 26, 2014
I join letter writer Joe Heldmann in being thankful that he sold his Ocean City rental property ( " Ocean City needs to enforce its laws," Aug. 22). He rented it out for an entire season to Russian "kids," while he slept soundly 150 miles away in Catonsville. His $25 noise ordinance fee is hardly enough to keep police officers at his condo door on a regular basis to supervise partying teenagers. I rent out two condos on a weekly basis in Ocean City through an online site.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Fakhar Durrani, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2012
Leaders of minority religious communities were requesting additional police protection as they prepared for weekend services after the fatal shooting of worshipers at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin last Sunday. Rehan Khan, president of the Masjid Al-Falaah mosque in Abingdon, said he has requested additional protection from the Harford County sheriff's office for the rest of Ramadan, which runs through mid-August, after members of the mosque expressed fears that they could be targeted.
NEWS
June 8, 2014
Great, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake ( "Mayor strolls to show safe streets," June 5), if we had the police protection you have then going out on public streets would be safe for us, too. But let the mayor not have all that protection around and go for a regular walk and then let's see how brave her comments about public safety would be. When you do that, Ms. Rawlings-Blake, then the public might feel it's safe out there. Until then, the murders and stabbings and shootings will continue by the thugs and druggies who control the streets.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,Washington Bureau | June 20, 1992
WASHINGTON -- A sharply divided Supreme Court went far yesterday toward forbidding local governments to force organizers of controversial marches and demonstrations to pay the added cost of providing police to protect them.Although a planned protest likely to stir a hostile response may mean that counties or cities will run up extra police costs, officials may not charge fees to help defray the added spending, the court majority said.Moving on to curb federal power, the court in a second ruling imposed historic new limits on Congress' power to compel the states to help solve major national problems.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Annie Linskey,SUN STAFF | June 9, 2005
The naked, unarmed man who was fatally shot by a police officer in Glen Burnie last month had called an emergency dispatcher from his home minutes earlier to plead for police protection, according to a recording of the 911 call. "Please hurry up, man, somebody's trying to kill me, man," Donald E. Coates, 20, told the Anne Arundel County dispatcher in a high-pitched tone on the night of May 24. "Please hurry up. ... A lot of people are after me." Police have said he was delusional. Toward the end of the six-minute call, Coates, who had barricaded himself in a bathroom after ordering people out of the house at gunpoint, reports that he has a gun. Several shots can be heard.
NEWS
May 29, 1991
"It's a hard issue. In the end, the children always suffer. I'm sureeven they (teachers) are divided on this. You don't go into teachingfor he money, because there's no money there. But you have to retain good teachers. There's three places the county should spend money: teachers, police protection and fire protection. I don't care what itcosts. I don't mind paying the taxes, even though my kids go to private school."
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | December 2, 1994
Carroll legislators told municipal officials last night that they wouldn't support a tax increase even if the money was used to beef up local police protection."
NEWS
April 13, 1993
THE editors of The Sugar Beet, the student newspaper of Garden City High School in Kansas, seemed to hit on the perfect way to answer newspaper readers everywhere who are all too quick to point out mistakes that appear in print.On April Fools' Day, an edition entitled "Safe Journalism" was published by the Beet editors, and it was entirely mistake-free. We're guessing the reason is because the paper that day had no stories and no headlines....* * *ANOTHER April story comes from the Czech Republic, where this year hundreds of toads will get police protection on their spring trek into the west Bohemian spa town of Karlovy Vary, according to the CTK news agency.
NEWS
June 8, 2014
Great, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake ( "Mayor strolls to show safe streets," June 5), if we had the police protection you have then going out on public streets would be safe for us, too. But let the mayor not have all that protection around and go for a regular walk and then let's see how brave her comments about public safety would be. When you do that, Ms. Rawlings-Blake, then the public might feel it's safe out there. Until then, the murders and stabbings and shootings will continue by the thugs and druggies who control the streets.
NEWS
May 22, 2014
Without knowing all the facts, it's impossible to say whether police officers acted responsibly in the events leading up to the death of 19-year-old George V. King, who was reportedly struck repeatedly with a Taser by an officer seeking to help staff and security at Good Samaritan Hospital subdue him. Was it appropriate for police to get involved in the first place? Was their use of force justifiable? We don't know, and Commissioner Anthony W. Batts is right to ask the public to reserve judgment.
NEWS
April 11, 2013
An article in the April 12, 1913, edition of The Argus reported on the surprising culprit after a church's interior was found damaged. What was at first supposed to be the work of vandals, bent on spite-work, at the Catonsville Presbyterian Church last week, when some of the carpet was ripped up and torn, the wires of a stereopticon machine cut and the doors badly mutilated, proved to be the work of a stray dog which was imprisoned in...
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Fakhar Durrani, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2012
Leaders of minority religious communities were requesting additional police protection as they prepared for weekend services after the fatal shooting of worshipers at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin last Sunday. Rehan Khan, president of the Masjid Al-Falaah mosque in Abingdon, said he has requested additional protection from the Harford County sheriff's office for the rest of Ramadan, which runs through mid-August, after members of the mosque expressed fears that they could be targeted.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | December 30, 2010
With a tight budget anticipated in the coming year, Annapolis Mayor Joshua J. Cohen plans to look at possible increases to municipal fees. While saying he wants to avoid raising property taxes, Cohen said that he plans a broad review of the city's entire fee structure, with a close look at another hike to the city's liquor license fees. "His sort of philosophy is that you should pay for the service that you're given," said Philip McGowan, a spokesman for Cohen, a Democrat. "The mayor has said we need to look at things across the board and say, 'Is the fee commensurate with what it costs to put out the service?
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | June 4, 2009
Anne Arundel County's police chief promised Wednesday night to crack down on teenage gang activity in response to community fears and anger stemming from the death of a 14-year-old Crofton boy who was beaten while he bicycled near his home last weekend. Hours after the funeral for Christopher David Jones, police Chief Col. James Teare Sr. told a crowd of more than 500 people to expect to see a mobile command unit, along with foot and bicycle patrols in their Crofton-area neighborhoods.
NEWS
By MARY GAIL HARE | June 9, 2007
Aberdeen police have charged two city residents with second-degree assault in an attempted attack on Mayor S. Fred Simmons, authorities said yesterday. Dravine I. Henderson, 18, threatened Simmons with a baseball bat and used abusive language, police said. A 17-year-old boy, who was egging on Henderson during the incident on East Bel Air Avenue at noon Wednesday, was also arrested, authorities said. "They approached the mayor aggressively with Henderson holding a bat," said Sgt. Fred Budnick, police spokesman.
NEWS
By Traci A. Johnson and Traci A. Johnson,Staff Writer | December 2, 1993
Union Bridge and New Windsor officials are considering additional police coverage, despite their opinion that each town's needs are being served adequately by the state police Resident Trooper Program.Officials in each town have been investigating the options because residents have complained about the enforcement provided by the current arrangement -- one trooper for whom the towns share expenses and who patrols each town for four hours five days a week."Knock on wood, Union Bridge's crime is nothing compared to some other areas.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | May 2, 1996
Police protection in Union Bridge is expected to be provided by the resident state trooper the town shares with nearby New Windsor, at least for another year.The budget scheduled for public hearing and a council vote on May 20 resolves a debate over police protection by continuing the resident trooper program for the fiscal year that starts July 1. But Mayor Perry L. Jones said the council police committee won't abandon the issue."We'll probably be studying different angles through the year," Mr. Jones said.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Heather A. Dinich and Jeff Barker and Heather A. Dinich,Sun reporters | May 27, 2007
COLLEGE PARK -- Maryland football coach Ralph Friedgen says he routinely plucks about 20 players at random from the practice field each month and requires them to take drug tests. "I have the largest group of male athletes on campus," says Friedgen, whose tests come in addition to others done by the university and the NCAA. "I have 18- to 22-year-old kids. If I don't stay on top of that, then I'll have a real problem." Friedgen has been known to dispatch assistants to bars to try to keep players out of harm's way. His coaches also conduct periodic evening dormitory checks, and men's basketball coach Gary Williams began requiring his players this past season to live on campus.
NEWS
December 27, 2006
ISSUE: Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold, who has moved to cut spending in his first weeks in office, plans to continue using a police security detail that costs at least $125,000 a year. During the fall campaign, Leopold took a skeptical stance on the use by his predecessor, Janet S. Owens, of police officers to drive her and provide protection. Since then, he said, the outgoing police chief, P. Thomas Shanahan, and the incoming chief, James Teare Sr., persuaded him to continue using the security detail.
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