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NEWS
October 2, 2013
What an amazingly fresh perspective was offered by commentator Richard Vatz on the Towson Town Hall meeting and the arrest of a disruptive parent, Robert Small ( "Giving lip service to debate," Sept. 27). Mr. Vatz stated very clearly that people give rhetorical cover to democracy, but that once they have gained the reins of power they are not much interested in promoting free speech or dissent. This is true of everyone from the president on down. I would add another perspective to this fiasco: When is a cop a cop if he or she is moonlighting as something else and is not recognized as a police officer?
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NEWS
August 4, 2014
Your report of the trial of an off-duty police officer from New Jersey charged with the fatal shooting of a man in Maryland raises a couple of general questions ( "N.J. officer not guilty of murder in Arundel road rage shooting," July 30). Just what authority does an off-duty, out-of-state police officer have to exercise police powers - flashing his badge in a different state, for example? And since 911 operators have answers for just about any emergency, what would the 911 operator's response be to an out-of-jurisdiction, off-duty sheriff or police officer's call saying he was holding someone at gunpoint?
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NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff Meredith Schlow contributed to this story | June 27, 1991
The city and Baltimore County have moved a step closer to an agreement that would give their police officers full police powers in both jurisdictions.The city Board of Estimates, yesterday approved a police mutual aid agreement which expands the limited police authority granted by the state legislature for drug investigations and hot pursuit of suspects across jurisdictional lines. County officials must now act on the agreement before it can take effect."To our knowledge this is the first police mutual aid agreement between jurisdictions in Maryland with this kind of full police powers," said city Deputy Police Commissioner Michael C. Zotos, who presented the agreement to the board.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
A high-ranking Annapolis police officer has been suspended after he was charged with second-degree assault in an alleged domestic dispute, according to police. Capt. Christopher A. Amoia was charged April 4, according to court records and Lt. Gregory Wright, a spokesman for the Easton Police Department. Wright said police were called to Amoia's home in Easton at 10:30 that night. The victim told police that she and Amoia had been arguing and things turned physical. Police reported that the victim told them Amoia had her against a wall with his forearm, Wright said.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2011
The head of the Baltimore County police union has had his police powers restored after he received probation before judgment on misdemeanor assault charges in Circuit Court this week. Sgt. Cole B. Weston had his police powers suspended and was placed on administrative duties soon after he was charged in late March with second-degree assault and reckless endangerment in connection with an altercation with another man in Parkville. Police spokeswoman Detective Cathy Batton said that after an administrative hearing at the Police Department this week, Weston's police powers were restored.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2002
A city police officer allegedly caught on videotape swinging at or hitting a spectator during the Preakness on Saturday lost his police powers after an internal hearing yesterday and was assigned to administrative duties. Police officials said Officer Troy Chesley, 29, an eight-year veteran, will remain on administrative duty pending the outcome of an internal investigation. The videotape shows Chesley and other officers trying to control a melee involving between 10 and 15 people in the infield of Pimlico Race Course, and the fight appears to be getting out of hand when Chesley is seen swinging at a spectator with something in his hand or with both hands, police officials said.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
City and state legislators say they will push for greater regulation of longstanding but little-known laws that allow security guards to be granted law enforcement powers to arrest and search citizens. "If special police make sense, if they're necessary, and if they really do provide enhanced public safety, then at a minimum there needs to be oversight, accountability, training, and qualifications that are set by the state," Sen. Brian Frosh, who chairs the Judicial Proceedings Committee, said Monday.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2001
Anne Arundel County's police chief has reinstated the suspended police powers of two supervisors who were on duty when a drunken driving suspect died of antifreeze poisoning in police custody last December, officials confirmed yesterday. Sgt. R. Michael Madison got his badge and gun back yesterday, and Lt. Gregory Eshleman's police powers were restored late last week, department officials said. The two officers were on duty Dec. 15, 2000, the night Philip A. Montgomery died in a Southern District holding cell.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Staff Writer | March 26, 1993
Although Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke called yesterday for an increase in Baltimore's piggyback tax to pay for additional police officers, his administration wants to keep state police authority limited in the crime-besieged city.The administration, by way of the city's Senate delegation to the Maryland General Assembly, made that clear most recently on Monday. That's when the Senate Judicial Proceedings Committee -- on which the chairman of the city delegation sits -- voted unanimously to kill a bill that would have authorized troopers to exercise full police powers in the city.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2011
The president of the Baltimore County police union has been suspended with pay and stripped of his police powers after an internal department investigation, months after he received probation before judgment on misdemeanor assault charges, a department spokeswoman said. Sgt. Cole B. Weston, who has led the Baltimore County Fraternal Order of Police Lodge No. 4 for 12 years, will be suspended pending an administrative hearing that has not yet been scheduled, said Elise Armacost, a department spokeswoman.
NEWS
October 2, 2013
What an amazingly fresh perspective was offered by commentator Richard Vatz on the Towson Town Hall meeting and the arrest of a disruptive parent, Robert Small ( "Giving lip service to debate," Sept. 27). Mr. Vatz stated very clearly that people give rhetorical cover to democracy, but that once they have gained the reins of power they are not much interested in promoting free speech or dissent. This is true of everyone from the president on down. I would add another perspective to this fiasco: When is a cop a cop if he or she is moonlighting as something else and is not recognized as a police officer?
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | September 25, 2013
The State's Attorney's Office plans to present video surveillance footage as evidence during its prosecution of a Howard County police officer charged with assaulting a man while off-duty, State's Attorney spokesman Wayne Kirwan said Wednesday.  Kirwan also said the March incident involving Pfc. Lawrence Cameron Cook, a seven-year veteran of the force, took place in the parking lot of a Giant located in the village of Dorsey Search in Columbia between...
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2013
After losing her bid to unseat Baltimore Sheriff John Anderson in 2010, Deborah Claridy said, she went from being the highest-ranking female sworn deputy in the sheriff's office to being responsible for checking the hand sanitizers in the city courthouses. On Sunday, Claridy sued Anderson in U.S. District Court, alleging he retaliated against her after she criticized his leadership during the campaign. She is suing Anderson as an individual and seeking at least $2.5 million in relief as well as the restoration of her original job duties.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2013
A Baltimore County police officer was arrested on a warrant Thursday and charged with malfeasance in office, though details on what led to his arrest were not immediately available. Aaron Pross, 29, a county policeman hired in 2007, posted bond and was released Thursday, according to court records. Attempts to reach him for comment were unsuccessful, and he had no attorney listed in court records. Lt. Rob McCullough, a spokesman for the department, said Pross' police powers have been suspended.
NEWS
By Andrea Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2013
Anne Arundel County police said Tuesday that no criminal charges will be filed against an officer who placed a camera in a boys' restroom at Glen Burnie High School. But the officer involved in the incident, who was not identified, remains on administrative leave. In a statement, police said they had conducted an investigation in conjunction with the Anne Arundel County state's attorney's office, and "based upon the evidence, no criminal laws have been violated, and therefore the officer involved in this incident will not be criminally charged.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2013
No photos, recordings or videos were found on any computers "associated with the police officer" who is under investigation by Anne Arundel County police in the placement of what appeared to be a camera in a boys' bathroom at Glen Burnie High School, county police said Friday. Lt. T.J. Smith declined to say how many computers were seized in the investigation, whose computers they were, or where the search - or searches - took place. "No images of any person were captured," on the computers or from the item found Wednesday by a student in the boys bathroom in the media building of the high school, Smith said.
NEWS
May 25, 2002
In Baltimore County Pennsylvania man, 29, killed in accident near Gorsuch Mills GORSUCH MILLS - A York County, Pa., man was killed early yesterday in a one-vehicle accident on Stewartstown Road, north of Gorsuch Mills, Baltimore County police said. Cpl. Ronald Brooks, a police spokesman, said Kipp Alan McCleary of the 3900 block of Orchard Town Road in Stewartstown, Pa., was driving north in a 1999 Porsche when the car left the road, hit an embankment and flipped onto its roof. McCleary, 29, was thrown from the car but was then pinned under the vehicle.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | September 1, 1999
Two officers accused of handcuffing a woman and making sexually suggestive remarks to her will be disciplined by the Baltimore County Police Department, a spokesman said yesterday.The discipline follows disposition of separate criminal cases for Rodger B. Clise, 36, and Thomas M. Siwek, 43, both assigned to the Cockeysville Precinct. Siwek was given 80 hours of community service and Clise's charges were dismissed, said police spokesman Bill Toohey.According to charging documents, the two officers walked into a feed store called The Mill of Hereford in the 17000 block of York Road on May 27. When a clerk jokingly pointed out a female customer as the reason an alarm had been set off, Siwek handcuffed her, according to court documents, and sexually suggestive jokes were made a few minutes before the woman was freed.
NEWS
October 23, 2012
To become a barber in Maryland, you need to have completed 1,200 hours of classroom instruction or 2,250 hours as an apprentice. The state requires licensed foresters to have a four-year college degree in forestry, two years of experience and five references. You even need to pass an exam to work as an interior designer. But all it takes to be given the power to detain people, search them and even arrest them is to fill out a two-page form. No training required, and for all intents and purposes, no oversight.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | October 22, 2012
City and state legislators say they will push for greater regulation of longstanding but little-known laws that allow security guards to be granted law enforcement powers to arrest and search citizens. "If special police make sense, if they're necessary, and if they really do provide enhanced public safety, then at a minimum there needs to be oversight, accountability, training, and qualifications that are set by the state," Sen. Brian Frosh, who chairs the Judicial Proceedings Committee, said Monday.
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