Advertisement
HomeCollectionsPolice Department
IN THE NEWS

Police Department

NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to the Sun | May 18, 2007
A dispute between Annapolis officials and a contractor renovating and expanding the Police Department could be heading for legal action. A week after officials halted work on the $8.8 million project, consultants hired by the city are ripping out portions of the ceiling and walls in search of incomplete or faulty construction, while the contractor insists that the city is nitpicking and behind on payments. Jim Chase, project manager for J.G. Garcete Co. Inc. of Hyattsville, predicted that the two sides will end up in court.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2002
The city Police Department has bestowed honors on 47 officers, employees and citizens in its annual Medal Day ceremony recognizing acts of bravery, dedication to service and assistance from the public. The highest of the awards in the ceremony Wednesday at Baltimore's War Memorial Building was a Silver Star for excellence to Drug Enforcement Unit Detective Bryan S. Campbell for his role in shutting down a major drug ring in 2000 and the arrest of a city police officer who was on a drug dealer's payroll.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2003
Federal investigators have subpoenaed records from the Baltimore Police Department relating to threats made against former Commissioner Edward T. Norris and how the agency decides to authorize and pay overtime to its employees, police sources said yesterday. A subpoena arrived at police headquarters June 16 and was apparently related to a federal grand jury investigation of Norris, who used a little-known, off-the-books expense account to finance thousands of dollars in expensive meals, trips and gifts while commissioner.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 30, 2005
SEATTLE -- Among the depleted ranks of police departments throughout the country, it has come to this: desperate want ads offering signing bonuses to new recruits, and cops paying other cops to find new cops. It seems nobody wants to be a police officer anymore, officials say. But rather than lower standards, departments are taking a page from recruiters in sports and the corporate world. Here in King County, the most populous in the Pacific Northwest, the Sheriff's Office is trying a kind of bounty hunting: Any deputy who can bring in someone who eventually becomes an officer will get a bonus of 40 hours of extra vacation time, worth up to $1,300.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Gus G. Sentementes and Annie Linskey and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun Reporters | July 20, 2007
Mayor Sheila Dixon said yesterday that she replaced her unpopular police commissioner because she "wasn't feeling that drive like I wanted to" and said she was impressed with the way his interim replacement, Frederick H. Bealefeld III, peppered colleagues with engaging and challenging questions during crime meetings. In an interview hours after she formally announced she had asked Leonard D. Hamm to resign amid plunging support and soaring numbers of homicides and shootings, Dixon confirmed long-standing claims from officers and their union that Bealefeld has effectively been running the department for months.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2000
Residents expressed concerns ranging from police brutality to traffic congestion to run-down parks at a public forum held by Mayor Martin O'Malley last night at Edmondson High School in Southwest Baltimore. The "Mayor's Night Out," O'Malley's second forum since taking office in December, came a day after Edward T. Norris, 40, was nominated as police commissioner to replace Ronald L. Daniel, who resigned last week. Many in the black community have said they don't want Norris, the chief architect of New York's policing strategy.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2001
Anne Arundel County's Police Department doesn't just need officers. It needs them now. As a result, Police Chief P. Thomas Shanahan said last week the department will allow officers to transfer from other jurisdictions - a reversal of his earlier position. The policy of allowing lateral transfers means officers may come to work for Anne Arundel County from another area without first attending a six-month training academy. Instead, they would attend several weeks of training on county police regulations and policies.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
One year after city officials pledged to reinvigorate Baltimore's police civilian review board, members say their work feels insignificant and they are still seeking more authority. The Police Department recently said it would ask the volunteer citizen panel to look at police-involved shootings and other major use-of-force cases. The reviews, however, would occur after the cases have been closed — a role that seems perfunctory, members say. "We want to know: What are we really going to do?"
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | January 4, 2000
Col. Victor D. Gregory, chief of the Baltimore Police Department's Human Resources Bureau and a career police officer, died Saturday of cancer at Genesis Eldercare Center in Randallstown. He was 51 and lived in Woodstock, Howard County. Colonel Gregory had been head of the department's Education and Training Division for a year when in 1997 he was named acting chief and then later chief of the Human Resources Bureau, where his responsibilities included supervising personnel and hiring officers.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | December 25, 1992
The head of the Annapolis Police Department's Black Officer Association charged yesterday that the police chief and his staff tried to set him up in an undercover drug sting because he criticized the department as racist."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.