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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 30, 2005
SEATTLE -- Among the depleted ranks of police departments throughout the country, it has come to this: desperate want ads offering signing bonuses to new recruits, and cops paying other cops to find new cops. It seems nobody wants to be a police officer anymore, officials say. But rather than lower standards, departments are taking a page from recruiters in sports and the corporate world. Here in King County, the most populous in the Pacific Northwest, the Sheriff's Office is trying a kind of bounty hunting: Any deputy who can bring in someone who eventually becomes an officer will get a bonus of 40 hours of extra vacation time, worth up to $1,300.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Gus G. Sentementes and Annie Linskey and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun Reporters | July 20, 2007
Mayor Sheila Dixon said yesterday that she replaced her unpopular police commissioner because she "wasn't feeling that drive like I wanted to" and said she was impressed with the way his interim replacement, Frederick H. Bealefeld III, peppered colleagues with engaging and challenging questions during crime meetings. In an interview hours after she formally announced she had asked Leonard D. Hamm to resign amid plunging support and soaring numbers of homicides and shootings, Dixon confirmed long-standing claims from officers and their union that Bealefeld has effectively been running the department for months.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2000
Residents expressed concerns ranging from police brutality to traffic congestion to run-down parks at a public forum held by Mayor Martin O'Malley last night at Edmondson High School in Southwest Baltimore. The "Mayor's Night Out," O'Malley's second forum since taking office in December, came a day after Edward T. Norris, 40, was nominated as police commissioner to replace Ronald L. Daniel, who resigned last week. Many in the black community have said they don't want Norris, the chief architect of New York's policing strategy.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2001
Anne Arundel County's Police Department doesn't just need officers. It needs them now. As a result, Police Chief P. Thomas Shanahan said last week the department will allow officers to transfer from other jurisdictions - a reversal of his earlier position. The policy of allowing lateral transfers means officers may come to work for Anne Arundel County from another area without first attending a six-month training academy. Instead, they would attend several weeks of training on county police regulations and policies.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2014
One year after city officials pledged to reinvigorate Baltimore's police civilian review board, members say their work feels insignificant and they are still seeking more authority. The Police Department recently said it would ask the volunteer citizen panel to look at police-involved shootings and other major use-of-force cases. The reviews, however, would occur after the cases have been closed — a role that seems perfunctory, members say. "We want to know: What are we really going to do?"
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff Writer | December 25, 1992
The head of the Annapolis Police Department's Black Officer Association charged yesterday that the police chief and his staff tried to set him up in an undercover drug sting because he criticized the department as racist."
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | May 2, 2001
Every year they raise their glasses to heroes who walk among them - the officers who rescue people from fiery crashes, the ones who speak for dead victims, the ones who search for Alzheimer's patients who wander away or missing children. Tonight, as has become the tradition, Anne Arundel County police officers chosen to receive awards of excellence and commendations will wave off the applause. They will instead talk about others not being honored in the ballroom at Michael's Eighth Avenue.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | March 24, 1991
The videotaped images of Los Angeles policemen taking turns clubbing and kicking a lone suspect with apparent abandon suggest for Dr. James McGee the animal instincts that surface when humans acting in groups get swept into a frenzy."
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2000
Long after they were flown by Army pilots to track enemy advances in the jungles of Vietnam, after they were traded to National Guard units and then declared obsolete for military use, the OH-58 helicopters were quietly transferred to small airfields across America. Four of them landed at Lee Airport in Edgewater. They were gifts to the Anne Arundel County Police Department from the U.S. Department of Defense, which in the mid-1990s was reassigning the retired aircraft to law enforcement agencies as part of the domestic drug war. At first, the issue was how police would use the old military helicopters.
NEWS
March 16, 2000
MORE than a month ago, Mayor Martin O'Malley released his transition team's verbatim reviews of city departments. That gave Baltimoreans a better understanding of their city's problems and the new administration's timetable for dealing with them. The mayor should now do the same with voluminous consultants' reports concerning the police department. There is no reason to keep those studies secret. Among reports that ought to be released and subjected to public discussion are: A $140,000 review of the police department's overall operations by Jack Maple and John Linder.
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