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By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | April 29, 1993
Edward E. Fox Jr. is a highly decorated Baltimore police officer who went undercover to help nail William "Little Will" Franklin, Tommy Lee Canty, James C. Harris and several other notorious drug dealers.The undercover work was dangerous, but Officer Fox thought he was performing a valuable service in the war against drugs. Now he wonders whether his work was recognized by the top brass in the Police Department.Officer Fox's career as a narcotics investigator abruptly ended in October 1991 after he was quoted in an article about "New York Boys" -- violent New York drug dealers who have set up shop in city neighborhoods.
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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1999
Taneytown's bid to buy back a building that once served as City Hall appears successful, city officials say.If the city's offer is accepted, as expected, Taneytown will own the property at 16-18 E. Baltimore St., across from its current City Hall, Mayor W. Robert Flickinger said yesterday.The Police Department likely will move into the new quarters after renovations are completed within about six months, he said. The Police Department uses space in City Hall.Taneytown officials set aside up to $125,000 in the city's fiscal 1999 budget for obtaining space needed to alleviate cramped conditions at City Hall, at 15-17 E. Baltimore St., which houses a 10-member Police Department and an 11-member administrative staff, said City Manager Chip Boyles.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1997
Col. Gordon C. Lee, a retired Baltimore County police colonel described as the "example of what an officer should be" in his 34-year career, died of cancer Saturday at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 82.He served on the county force from 1941, when he started as a patrolman in the Pikesville area, until he retired in 1975 as a colonel after serving briefly as acting police chief."He was universally admired by those who served under him," said John A. Metzger, who worked with Colonel Lee as a spokesman for the Police Department in the 1970s.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1999
Baltimore Police Department is ordering majors to pick up patrol shifts on the street to ensure that high-ranking department personnel are available 24 hours a day to respond to significant crimes.The first patrol started last night when Maj. Michael Bass climbed into a marked patrol car. Twenty-eight majors will rotate through eight-hour shifts, which will involve reponding to crimes and inspecting district stations.Col. Bert Shirey, acting police commissioner, said it will ensure that a major is available to respond to incidents and that officers are doing their jobs properly.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer Staff writer Michael Ollove contributed to this article | March 10, 1993
As a grand jury released a report critical of the Baltimore Police Department's management and drug-arrest record, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and State's Attorney Stuart O. Simms angrily dismissed the findings yesterday as shallow and amateurish."
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | March 16, 1993
A three-month internal audit of the police department's property section has shown that a previously reported theft was nearly three times greater than police estimated.Police Chief James N. Robey said Friday that $8,000 was stolen by former employees, but no guns, drugs or other property was taken. Police had believed that about $3,000 had been stolen.The department assigned five investigators to conduct an internal audit of its property records after the county auditor's office discovered a theft and other discrepancies in the property section records in October.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,sun reporter | October 4, 2006
Howard County has settled a sexual harassment lawsuit by a female police officer for $75,000 after she alleged a hostile "men's locker-room" mentality in the Police Department. All but $8,000 of the settlement covers legal fees. Susan Ensko, a 17-year veteran of the force, had been seeking $500,000 in damages and attorney fees in the lawsuit, which she filed in 2004. The settlement states that both parties deny liability in the matter and are prohibited from speaking with the press about it. The settlement was written Sept.
NEWS
April 7, 1998
WHEN 18-year-old Herman Charity joined the Howard County Police Department in 1968, he fulfilled a childhood dream.He didn't know that he was also becoming a pioneer.Mr. Charity, who retired last week as a lieutenant and head of the internal affairs division, didn't know before applying for the job that he would become the first African-American on the Howard force. He can't say that his race never mattered during his subsequent 30 years in the department.In the early days, he had to endure the racial taunts of fellow officers as well as the resentment of those residents who wouldn't give him the respect due a law enforcement officer.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2000
Sherry Llewellyn is in her third week as spokeswoman for the Howard County Police Department, and so far it's been the calmest. Llewellyn is the first civilian to serve in media relations for the department. In addition to learning the basics of her job, she has had to become familiar with how a police station works. What were supposed to be a few weeks of low-stress training turned into hands-on experience with newsworthy crimes. During her first week on the job, Llewellyn had to deal with media inquiries for a string of armed robberies, a sizable ecstasy drug bust and a kidnapping.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2006
Calvin Reed, the new general manager of the Jessup truck stop on Route 175, wishes that his unofficial books of those banned from the premises - two three-ring binders brimming with mug shots of bad boys (and girls) dating to 1995 - were thinner. The binders contain pages protected in plastic sleeves that list information on prostitutes caught darting between rows of parked semis, "lumpers" who loiter on the property in the early morning begging for money or looking for work and thieves and drug dealers.
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