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By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | March 16, 1993
A three-month internal audit of the police department's property section has shown that a previously reported theft was nearly three times greater than police estimated.Police Chief James N. Robey said Friday that $8,000 was stolen by former employees, but no guns, drugs or other property was taken. Police had believed that about $3,000 had been stolen.The department assigned five investigators to conduct an internal audit of its property records after the county auditor's office discovered a theft and other discrepancies in the property section records in October.
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NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,sun reporter | October 4, 2006
Howard County has settled a sexual harassment lawsuit by a female police officer for $75,000 after she alleged a hostile "men's locker-room" mentality in the Police Department. All but $8,000 of the settlement covers legal fees. Susan Ensko, a 17-year veteran of the force, had been seeking $500,000 in damages and attorney fees in the lawsuit, which she filed in 2004. The settlement states that both parties deny liability in the matter and are prohibited from speaking with the press about it. The settlement was written Sept.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2000
Sherry Llewellyn is in her third week as spokeswoman for the Howard County Police Department, and so far it's been the calmest. Llewellyn is the first civilian to serve in media relations for the department. In addition to learning the basics of her job, she has had to become familiar with how a police station works. What were supposed to be a few weeks of low-stress training turned into hands-on experience with newsworthy crimes. During her first week on the job, Llewellyn had to deal with media inquiries for a string of armed robberies, a sizable ecstasy drug bust and a kidnapping.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 14, 1999
CHARLES SMOTHERS has filed a $30 million lawsuit against the Baltimore Police Department, claiming two counts of wrongful discharge, fraud, violation of rights and civil conspiracy.I hope he guts the department like a fish, bleeds it dry, makes it pay. In August 1997, Smothers -- then Officer Charles Smothers -- shot and killed a knife-wielding James Quarles at Lexington Market. It was one of the cleanest shootings in Baltimore police history. How did the department repay him? It made him the poster boy for domestic violence and had Smothers suffer for the sins of every Baltimore cop who beat his wife or girlfriend.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | April 29, 1993
Edward E. Fox Jr. is a highly decorated Baltimore police officer who went undercover to help nail William "Little Will" Franklin, Tommy Lee Canty, James C. Harris and several other notorious drug dealers.The undercover work was dangerous, but Officer Fox thought he was performing a valuable service in the war against drugs. Now he wonders whether his work was recognized by the top brass in the Police Department.Officer Fox's career as a narcotics investigator abruptly ended in October 1991 after he was quoted in an article about "New York Boys" -- violent New York drug dealers who have set up shop in city neighborhoods.
NEWS
By MELISSA HARRIS and MELISSA HARRIS,SUN REPORTER | May 7, 2006
Calvin Reed, the new general manager of the Jessup truck stop on Route 175, wishes that his unofficial books of those banned from the premises - two three-ring binders brimming with mug shots of bad boys (and girls) dating to 1995 - were thinner. The binders contain pages protected in plastic sleeves that list information on prostitutes caught darting between rows of parked semis, "lumpers" who loiter on the property in the early morning begging for money or looking for work and thieves and drug dealers.
NEWS
By Susan Gvozdas and Susan Gvozdas,Special to the Sun | May 18, 2007
A dispute between Annapolis officials and a contractor renovating and expanding the Police Department could be heading for legal action. A week after officials halted work on the $8.8 million project, consultants hired by the city are ripping out portions of the ceiling and walls in search of incomplete or faulty construction, while the contractor insists that the city is nitpicking and behind on payments. Jim Chase, project manager for J.G. Garcete Co. Inc. of Hyattsville, predicted that the two sides will end up in court.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2002
The city Police Department has bestowed honors on 47 officers, employees and citizens in its annual Medal Day ceremony recognizing acts of bravery, dedication to service and assistance from the public. The highest of the awards in the ceremony Wednesday at Baltimore's War Memorial Building was a Silver Star for excellence to Drug Enforcement Unit Detective Bryan S. Campbell for his role in shutting down a major drug ring in 2000 and the arrest of a city police officer who was on a drug dealer's payroll.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | July 2, 2003
Federal investigators have subpoenaed records from the Baltimore Police Department relating to threats made against former Commissioner Edward T. Norris and how the agency decides to authorize and pay overtime to its employees, police sources said yesterday. A subpoena arrived at police headquarters June 16 and was apparently related to a federal grand jury investigation of Norris, who used a little-known, off-the-books expense account to finance thousands of dollars in expensive meals, trips and gifts while commissioner.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 30, 2005
SEATTLE -- Among the depleted ranks of police departments throughout the country, it has come to this: desperate want ads offering signing bonuses to new recruits, and cops paying other cops to find new cops. It seems nobody wants to be a police officer anymore, officials say. But rather than lower standards, departments are taking a page from recruiters in sports and the corporate world. Here in King County, the most populous in the Pacific Northwest, the Sheriff's Office is trying a kind of bounty hunting: Any deputy who can bring in someone who eventually becomes an officer will get a bonus of 40 hours of extra vacation time, worth up to $1,300.
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