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By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | January 19, 1992
Budget cuts that will leave the Baltimore County Police Department 122 officers short next month have prompted police officials to announce a major reorganization that will shift dozens of supervisors and administrators to patrol duties.The plan proposed by Chief Cornelius J. Behan was to be implemented in July, but will take effect Feb. 1 to cope with staff shortages caused by unfilled vacancies and the number of officers accepting a retirement incentive package announced last year by County Executive Roger B. Hayden.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2005
Edgar Russell Moxley, whose more than 40-year career in law enforcement ranged from foot patrols as Ellicott City's night policeman to serving as first chief of the Howard County Police Department, died of cancer Saturday at his Ellicott City home. He was 98. Mr. Moxley was born and raised in Ellicott City, the son of a farmer. "I was born on June 30, 1906, in my father's house off of Jonestown Road, and I grew up as an ordinary country boy wearing knickers and overalls," Mr. Moxley wrote in an unpublished autobiographical sketch.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1995
Sykesville is among 1 percent of the nearly 7,000 police jurisdictions nationwide, and the only one in Maryland, to say "No, thank you" to a federal police protection grant.Sykesville is one of 63 police departments nationally to turn down a grant -- nearly $65,000 -- from the Community Oriented Policing Services at the U.S. Department of Justice, said an agency spokesman."Maybe the others were understaffed," said Mayor Jonathan S. Herman. "We have a good ratio of officers to residents."Councilman Michael H. Burgoyne said he doesn't care if Sykesville is the only town in the country to reject the grant.
NEWS
By Patrick McGreevy and Patrick McGreevy,Los Angeles Daily News | January 3, 1995
LOS ANGELES -- Three and a half years after the Christopher Commission proposed sweeping reform of the Los Angeles Police Department, many of its key recommendations have not been implemented -- drawing criticism that city officials are not doing enough to discourage potential brutality.Several key recommendations were folded into a 1992 ballot measure that became law.But 65 other recommended reforms were not part of the ballot measure, and less than a third of them have been implemented by the city, according to a recent Los Angeles Police Department report.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | February 27, 2009
A city councilman is demanding that the Police Department take action against three city officers - including the brother of Police Commissioner Frederick H. Bealefeld III - who have yet to be disciplined for internal violations in connection with a federal race discrimination complaint. Councilman Bernard C. "Jack" Young sent a letter last week to several high-ranking city officials asking why no action has been taken since charges were sustained early last year against three former homicide detectives - Lt. James W. Hagin Jr., Detective Paul A. Kidd and former Detective Charles E. Bealefeld - stemming from an incident in which a black homicide detective said he was ordered to look at Ku Klux Klan Web sites.
NEWS
April 7, 1998
WHEN 18-year-old Herman Charity joined the Howard County Police Department in 1968, he fulfilled a childhood dream.He didn't know that he was also becoming a pioneer.Mr. Charity, who retired last week as a lieutenant and head of the internal affairs division, didn't know before applying for the job that he would become the first African-American on the Howard force. He can't say that his race never mattered during his subsequent 30 years in the department.In the early days, he had to endure the racial taunts of fellow officers as well as the resentment of those residents who wouldn't give him the respect due a law enforcement officer.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1999
Taneytown's bid to buy back a building that once served as City Hall appears successful, city officials say.If the city's offer is accepted, as expected, Taneytown will own the property at 16-18 E. Baltimore St., across from its current City Hall, Mayor W. Robert Flickinger said yesterday.The Police Department likely will move into the new quarters after renovations are completed within about six months, he said. The Police Department uses space in City Hall.Taneytown officials set aside up to $125,000 in the city's fiscal 1999 budget for obtaining space needed to alleviate cramped conditions at City Hall, at 15-17 E. Baltimore St., which houses a 10-member Police Department and an 11-member administrative staff, said City Manager Chip Boyles.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1997
Col. Gordon C. Lee, a retired Baltimore County police colonel described as the "example of what an officer should be" in his 34-year career, died of cancer Saturday at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 82.He served on the county force from 1941, when he started as a patrolman in the Pikesville area, until he retired in 1975 as a colonel after serving briefly as acting police chief."He was universally admired by those who served under him," said John A. Metzger, who worked with Colonel Lee as a spokesman for the Police Department in the 1970s.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1999
Baltimore Police Department is ordering majors to pick up patrol shifts on the street to ensure that high-ranking department personnel are available 24 hours a day to respond to significant crimes.The first patrol started last night when Maj. Michael Bass climbed into a marked patrol car. Twenty-eight majors will rotate through eight-hour shifts, which will involve reponding to crimes and inspecting district stations.Col. Bert Shirey, acting police commissioner, said it will ensure that a major is available to respond to incidents and that officers are doing their jobs properly.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer Staff writer Michael Ollove contributed to this article | March 10, 1993
As a grand jury released a report critical of the Baltimore Police Department's management and drug-arrest record, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and State's Attorney Stuart O. Simms angrily dismissed the findings yesterday as shallow and amateurish."
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