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By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | January 19, 1992
Budget cuts that will leave the Baltimore County Police Department 122 officers short next month have prompted police officials to announce a major reorganization that will shift dozens of supervisors and administrators to patrol duties.The plan proposed by Chief Cornelius J. Behan was to be implemented in July, but will take effect Feb. 1 to cope with staff shortages caused by unfilled vacancies and the number of officers accepting a retirement incentive package announced last year by County Executive Roger B. Hayden.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2005
Edgar Russell Moxley, whose more than 40-year career in law enforcement ranged from foot patrols as Ellicott City's night policeman to serving as first chief of the Howard County Police Department, died of cancer Saturday at his Ellicott City home. He was 98. Mr. Moxley was born and raised in Ellicott City, the son of a farmer. "I was born on June 30, 1906, in my father's house off of Jonestown Road, and I grew up as an ordinary country boy wearing knickers and overalls," Mr. Moxley wrote in an unpublished autobiographical sketch.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1995
Sykesville is among 1 percent of the nearly 7,000 police jurisdictions nationwide, and the only one in Maryland, to say "No, thank you" to a federal police protection grant.Sykesville is one of 63 police departments nationally to turn down a grant -- nearly $65,000 -- from the Community Oriented Policing Services at the U.S. Department of Justice, said an agency spokesman."Maybe the others were understaffed," said Mayor Jonathan S. Herman. "We have a good ratio of officers to residents."Councilman Michael H. Burgoyne said he doesn't care if Sykesville is the only town in the country to reject the grant.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 14, 1999
CHARLES SMOTHERS has filed a $30 million lawsuit against the Baltimore Police Department, claiming two counts of wrongful discharge, fraud, violation of rights and civil conspiracy.I hope he guts the department like a fish, bleeds it dry, makes it pay. In August 1997, Smothers -- then Officer Charles Smothers -- shot and killed a knife-wielding James Quarles at Lexington Market. It was one of the cleanest shootings in Baltimore police history. How did the department repay him? It made him the poster boy for domestic violence and had Smothers suffer for the sins of every Baltimore cop who beat his wife or girlfriend.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | April 29, 1993
Edward E. Fox Jr. is a highly decorated Baltimore police officer who went undercover to help nail William "Little Will" Franklin, Tommy Lee Canty, James C. Harris and several other notorious drug dealers.The undercover work was dangerous, but Officer Fox thought he was performing a valuable service in the war against drugs. Now he wonders whether his work was recognized by the top brass in the Police Department.Officer Fox's career as a narcotics investigator abruptly ended in October 1991 after he was quoted in an article about "New York Boys" -- violent New York drug dealers who have set up shop in city neighborhoods.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2000
Sherry Llewellyn is in her third week as spokeswoman for the Howard County Police Department, and so far it's been the calmest. Llewellyn is the first civilian to serve in media relations for the department. In addition to learning the basics of her job, she has had to become familiar with how a police station works. What were supposed to be a few weeks of low-stress training turned into hands-on experience with newsworthy crimes. During her first week on the job, Llewellyn had to deal with media inquiries for a string of armed robberies, a sizable ecstasy drug bust and a kidnapping.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | January 26, 1999
Taneytown's bid to buy back a building that once served as City Hall appears successful, city officials say.If the city's offer is accepted, as expected, Taneytown will own the property at 16-18 E. Baltimore St., across from its current City Hall, Mayor W. Robert Flickinger said yesterday.The Police Department likely will move into the new quarters after renovations are completed within about six months, he said. The Police Department uses space in City Hall.Taneytown officials set aside up to $125,000 in the city's fiscal 1999 budget for obtaining space needed to alleviate cramped conditions at City Hall, at 15-17 E. Baltimore St., which houses a 10-member Police Department and an 11-member administrative staff, said City Manager Chip Boyles.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,SUN STAFF | October 17, 1997
Col. Gordon C. Lee, a retired Baltimore County police colonel described as the "example of what an officer should be" in his 34-year career, died of cancer Saturday at Union Memorial Hospital. He was 82.He served on the county force from 1941, when he started as a patrolman in the Pikesville area, until he retired in 1975 as a colonel after serving briefly as acting police chief."He was universally admired by those who served under him," said John A. Metzger, who worked with Colonel Lee as a spokesman for the Police Department in the 1970s.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | November 6, 1999
Baltimore Police Department is ordering majors to pick up patrol shifts on the street to ensure that high-ranking department personnel are available 24 hours a day to respond to significant crimes.The first patrol started last night when Maj. Michael Bass climbed into a marked patrol car. Twenty-eight majors will rotate through eight-hour shifts, which will involve reponding to crimes and inspecting district stations.Col. Bert Shirey, acting police commissioner, said it will ensure that a major is available to respond to incidents and that officers are doing their jobs properly.
NEWS
By Sandy Banisky and Sandy Banisky,Staff Writer Staff writer Michael Ollove contributed to this article | March 10, 1993
As a grand jury released a report critical of the Baltimore Police Department's management and drug-arrest record, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and State's Attorney Stuart O. Simms angrily dismissed the findings yesterday as shallow and amateurish."
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