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By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | December 22, 2005
Paul John Lioi, a highly decorated retired police sergeant who headed arson investigations in Baltimore and once delivered a baby, died Friday of complications from diabetes at Florida East Hospital in Orlando. The former Cedonia resident was 72. In his 27-year career with the Baltimore Police Department, he received numerous commendations, including a top honor for his 1972 rescue of a woman held hostage at gunpoint. Sergeant Lioi was described in The Evening Sun in 1977 as "a small, quiet man, always neatly dressed and always very polite."
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NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2001
Baltimore Police Commissioner Edward T. Norris said yesterday that his department does not have a shortage of police cars and that its new deployment strategies are working well. Police commanders and union officials have complained recently that the department was having difficulty sending officers into high-crime areas because they did not have enough marked and unmarked cars. Norris said that officials are reviewing the department's needs and that the complaints might spring from "a management issue."
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Baltimore County Bureau of The Sun | January 19, 1992
Budget cuts that will leave the Baltimore County Police Department 122 officers short next month have prompted police officials to announce a major reorganization that will shift dozens of supervisors and administrators to patrol duties.The plan proposed by Chief Cornelius J. Behan was to be implemented in July, but will take effect Feb. 1 to cope with staff shortages caused by unfilled vacancies and the number of officers accepting a retirement incentive package announced last year by County Executive Roger B. Hayden.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | February 16, 2005
Edgar Russell Moxley, whose more than 40-year career in law enforcement ranged from foot patrols as Ellicott City's night policeman to serving as first chief of the Howard County Police Department, died of cancer Saturday at his Ellicott City home. He was 98. Mr. Moxley was born and raised in Ellicott City, the son of a farmer. "I was born on June 30, 1906, in my father's house off of Jonestown Road, and I grew up as an ordinary country boy wearing knickers and overalls," Mr. Moxley wrote in an unpublished autobiographical sketch.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1995
Sykesville is among 1 percent of the nearly 7,000 police jurisdictions nationwide, and the only one in Maryland, to say "No, thank you" to a federal police protection grant.Sykesville is one of 63 police departments nationally to turn down a grant -- nearly $65,000 -- from the Community Oriented Policing Services at the U.S. Department of Justice, said an agency spokesman."Maybe the others were understaffed," said Mayor Jonathan S. Herman. "We have a good ratio of officers to residents."Councilman Michael H. Burgoyne said he doesn't care if Sykesville is the only town in the country to reject the grant.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,justin.fenton@baltsun.com | January 7, 2009
Baltimore police will no longer release the names of officers who kill or injure people, changing a long-standing practice that the department believes put officers at risk. The decision is prompting criticism from several Baltimore leaders, who said withholding officers' names will only endanger an already tenuous relationship between the police and the community. Baltimore police shot 21 people last year, 13 of them fatally - the same number killed by police in 2007, when 31 people were shot.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
Four protesters were arrested - one of whom was pepper-sprayed - near Johns Hopkins Hospital after police say they refused to follow officers' orders and shoved officers who attempted to disperse them.  Anthony Guglielmi, the Police Department's chief spokesman, said the protesters locked arms and refused to allow trucks to enter a construction site at the intersection of Rutland Avenue and Eager Street. Police said organizers told protesters over a megaphone to stand their ground as police ordered them to move to a "safe location.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 4, 2014
Baltimore police acknowledged Wednesday afternoon that a homicide victim found early Tuesday in a field in Northeast Baltimore was a transgender woman, but details surrounding the case remained scarce. Police said Tuesday night that a man had been found dead that morning at 6:30 a.m. in the 1400 block of Fillmore St., near the U.S. Post Office in the Coldstream-Homestead-Montebello neighborhood. They identified the victim as Ricky Carlos Hall, of the 4000 block of Raymonn Ave. Police confirmed on Wednesday afternoon that Hall was a transgender woman who was known as "Kandy.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2012
When Baltimore first installed crime cameras in 2005, they numbered fewer than 200 and were largely confined to high-crime areas. Two mayors later, the number of cameras in the city's police surveillance system has quadrupled. Baltimore owns 583 and has access to feeds from more than 250 installed by various businesses. Now that system is likely to become much larger. The city's Board of Estimates agreed last week to create a database that will make it easier for businesses to give the Police Department access to their private security cameras.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | February 14, 1999
CHARLES SMOTHERS has filed a $30 million lawsuit against the Baltimore Police Department, claiming two counts of wrongful discharge, fraud, violation of rights and civil conspiracy.I hope he guts the department like a fish, bleeds it dry, makes it pay. In August 1997, Smothers -- then Officer Charles Smothers -- shot and killed a knife-wielding James Quarles at Lexington Market. It was one of the cleanest shootings in Baltimore police history. How did the department repay him? It made him the poster boy for domestic violence and had Smothers suffer for the sins of every Baltimore cop who beat his wife or girlfriend.
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